Definition of substrain in English:

substrain

noun

  • A strain of a virus derived from another strain.

    • ‘Experiments with "knockout" mice, substrains with specific genes subtracted from their genome, have made it easier to decipher how the many cytokines contribute to immune cell maturation.’
    • ‘Bacteria of this "difficult to kill" substrain then increase their numbers and repopulate the stomach.’
    • ‘MOYO-R substrain derives from the Moyo-In-Dry strain.’
    • ‘The nomenclature for 129 substrains has been revised by the Jackson Laboratory (http://www.informatics.jax.org/mgihome/nomen/strain 129.shtml) and the recommended designations were used in this article.’
    • ‘Organisms most commonly associated with infections are often a small subset of the total strains that constitute a species, and these substrains may exhibit little diversity.’
    • ‘Parts of the M. tuberculosis genome that are absent from the genomes of all BCG substrains and most NTM have been identified.’
    • ‘A mosquito F 2 population was obtained from pairwise matings between the parasite-susceptible RED strain and the resistant MOYO-R substrain.’
    • ‘Selection of the substrain and relative susceptibilities of the MOYO-R substrain and the RED strain are described by THATHY et al. 1994.’
    • ‘DA3 Hi, a highly metastatic substrain of the DA3 marine breast adenocarcinoma, cell line was obtained from Professor I. Witz (Department of Immunology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University).’
    • ‘Genetic crosses were performed to obtain F 1 intercross progeny between the P. gallinaceum-susceptible A. aegypti RED strain and the P. gallinaceum-resistant A. aegypti MOYO-R substrain.’
    • ‘The G ^ sub strain ^ term includes the bonded (bond, bond-angle, and torsional angles) and the van der Waals energy, which is calculated by molecular mechanics using GROMOS96.’
    • ‘During treatment the substrains with the steepest kill curve will disappear first.’
    • ‘This conclusion might be limited to the substrains that were used in Chubb's article.’

Pronunciation:

substrain

/ˈsəbˌstrān/