Definition of subculture in English:

subculture

noun

  • A cultural group within a larger culture, often having beliefs or interests at variance with those of the larger culture.

    • ‘A new phenomenon a youth subculture had reared its head, but the Comet seemed satisfied that the borough was not in imminent danger of being overrun.’
    • ‘Use of such sweeping categorization pays little regard to the existence of subcultures within the black community at large.’
    • ‘She escaped but joined a punk-rock subculture involved with drugs, and married an addict.’
    • ‘The graduation of nicknames within armies is a subculture in itself.’
    • ‘Cultures and subcultures constrain us because we internalize their beliefs and values.’
    • ‘The large number of cable and satellite channels and their trends are causing a fracturing of pop culture into more subcultures.’
    • ‘It's interesting how many musical subcultures survive, seemingly despite the efforts of major companies.’
    • ‘What was different about punk was the explosion of subcultures it created.’
    • ‘I would say dealing with people is not within the police subculture culturally glamorous; it is not something that you strive to do.’
    • ‘This stable diversity suggests that consistent subcultures flourish within our society.’
    • ‘Like tattoos, body piercings and heroin, it seems to be spreading from criminal subcultures to the mainstream.’
    • ‘The most striking general feature to be found is the extent to which what we would now call science is a subculture within philosophy.’
    • ‘Though much has been theorized to the contrary, such subcultures are not de facto resistant to a dominant ideology.’
    • ‘There were so many other film and cartoon subcultures during my primary school days that I suppose I got swamped.’
    • ‘Over the years, Rivers has no doubt aided hundreds of black youth by helping to divert them from the gang subculture.’
    • ‘Each of these communities of interest or subcultures has its own distinct perspective.’
    • ‘Make-up can thus serve to indicate membership in social subcultures, such as Goth or rave culture, or to advertise a person's identity as fashionable or hip.’
    • ‘Parents and children within the cultures and subcultures we have studied respond similarly to one another.’
    • ‘The penchant for sports wear among middle-class youth resided on an almost voyeuristic fascination with American hip-hop subcultures.’
    • ‘The argument was that these subcultures, particularly through their style, challenged the cultural codes and values of the ruling class.’

Pronunciation:

subculture

/ˈsəbˌkəlCHər/