Definition of Sturm und Drang in English:

Sturm und Drang

noun

  • 1A literary and artistic movement in Germany in the late 18th century, influenced by Jean-Jacques Rousseau and characterized by the expression of emotional unrest and a rejection of neoclassical literary norms.

    • ‘The big news is that for all the Sturm und Drang, we may be seeing the emergence of a remarkable expert consensus.’
    • ‘This is Romanticism's full flowering, minus the Sturm und Drang, and minus the ingenuity of an Edvard Grieg, for example.’
    • ‘To me, it has as much to do with Beethovenian Sturm und Drang as with babbling brooks.’
    • ‘In the new millennium we are again entering an age of impulse, urge and oppression - of Sturm und Drang.’
    • ‘Meanwhile the German Sturm und Drang movement had initiated the worship of Shakespeare as a natural genius whose works were the supreme antidote.’
    • ‘You get that early romanticism of Goethe, the Sturm und Drang giving way to something a bit more restrained.’
    • ‘Germany is another example - the movement known as Sturm und Drang (Storm and Stress) - was an independent cultural development.’
    • ‘Thibaud shows that Romanticism doesn't always mean Sturm und Drang.’
    • ‘The 1780s saw the emergence of the Sturm und Drang movement, which attempted to overturn the ethos of the German Enlightenment.’
    • ‘One can read Herder as just another voice in the Sturm und Drang of his time or one can argue that without Kant there would be no Herder or one can claim that his ideas and thoughts were and are the forerunners of postmodern anthropology.’
    • ‘Bezuidenhout, a talented fortepianist still in his early twenties, calls this collection of ‘minor’ Mozart (in key, not in significance) Sturm und Drang.’
    • ‘German dramatist and lyric poet, the son of an army surgeon, and, with his early play Die Räuber, the chief figure of the Sturm und Drang period of German literature.’
    • ‘The 18th century was an age of Sturm und Drang, upheavals, doubts, fears in which an endless questioning occurred throughout the social, political, scientific and moral fabric of society.’
    • ‘A major turning-point for both composers seemingly came in the early 1770s, when, influenced by the German literary movement known as Sturm und Drang, music became more intense.’
    • ‘Philosophically, Benny merges German Sturm und Drang, Eastern asceticism and a lot of other really weird shit.’
    • ‘It's there like the sets in an opera, a backdrop for acting out Oedipal fantasies and all sorts of Sturm und Drang.’
    • ‘But it is structural change, caused by the Sturm und Drang of technology, knowledge, and business practices, that keeps diminishing manufacturing's strength.’
    • ‘The German Sturm und Drang and the English Romantic Movement were about to sweep away the fragile lessons of the Enlightenment and reveal the dark recesses of the human soul.’
    • ‘But this, like the Sturm und Drang of the plot, is a small matter.’
    • ‘Maybe all this Sturm und Drang really is just a giant exercise in blowing off military steam.’
    confusion, upheaval, upheavals, turbulence, tumult, disorder, commotion, disturbance, agitation, ferment, unrest, trouble, disruption, upset, convulsions, chaos, mayhem, pandemonium, bedlam, uproar
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Turbulent emotion or stress.
      ‘that casual morning meeting dragged into a brawling afternoon of Sturm und Drang’
      • ‘German dramatist and lyric poet, the son of an army surgeon, and, with his early play Die Räuber, the chief figure of the Sturm und Drang period of German literature.’
      • ‘Companies can dramatically reduce the Sturm und Drang of recruitment and hiring and build a crackerjack sales force, according to authors Bradford D. Smart and Greg Alexander.’
      • ‘This isn't a movie with an overabundance of Sturm und Drang, but a trifle more aural variety couldn't hurt.’
      • ‘Thibaud shows that Romanticism doesn't always mean Sturm und Drang.’
      • ‘But amid the Sturm und Drang came one or two revealing moments.’
      • ‘The happy Menuetto of the third movement is contrasted with a Trio of an almost Sturm und Drang feel.’
      • ‘Wondeful loud chords, passion, almost Sturm und Drang.’
      • ‘To me, it has as much to do with Beethovenian Sturm und Drang as with babbling brooks.’
      • ‘She displayed easy grace, never attempting to be over showy, but also never trying to make the piano part more ' Sturm und Drang ' than it really is.’
      • ‘All of this Sturm und Drang will probably result in legislation forcing a further review that includes Congress in an oversight role.’
      • ‘And although her comedy is all about going over the top, DeLaria the singer is more concerned with the voice as instrument than as Sturm und Drang.’
      • ‘But it is structural change, caused by the Sturm und Drang of technology, knowledge, and business practices, that keeps diminishing manufacturing's strength.’
      • ‘The Sturm und Drang of Luther was safely domesticated in Lutheranism.’
      • ‘For all the Sturm und Drang in the broader economy, a surprising number of Americans are still rushing to get their piece of the American Dream.’
      • ‘Philosophically, Benny merges German Sturm und Drang, Eastern asceticism and a lot of other really weird stuff.’
      • ‘But this, like the Sturm und Drang of the plot, is a small matter.’
      • ‘The more familiar String Quartet also opens with a healthy dose of Sturm und Drang.’
      • ‘Under the influence of this reading he now finally broke with classicism and became one of the leaders of the new Sturm und Drang movement.’
      • ‘The intensity of their parents ' Sturm und Drang disturbs the Anton children.’
      • ‘This year we are again entering an age of impulse, urge and oppression and of Sturm und Drang.’

Origin

German, literally ‘storm and stress’.

Pronunciation

Sturm und Drang

/ˌSHto͝orm o͝on(d) ˈdraNG/