Definition of strut in US English:

strut

noun

  • 1A rod or bar forming part of a framework and designed to resist compression.

    • ‘Hinged struts connect transporter beams, much like a train.’
    • ‘All you have to do is take the hammer strut off your old hammer and put it on the new one.’
    • ‘Without adding much weight to a structure, struts allow it to resist bending and buckling.’
    • ‘Mr BW has put a sheet of wood underneath him to spread the load across the metal frame struts.’
    • ‘First, let's discuss cars that use a strut front suspension with a top stud mount.’
    • ‘I countered with power as the nose gear landing strut extended.’
    • ‘He allowed himself to slide to the side of the ship and catch a piece of the landing strut.’
    • ‘Vertical struts are joined to both the joists and rafters.’
    • ‘My hand was resting on a curved metal strut that could have been the edge of a hold.’
    • ‘The steel strut is a fabricated plate box girder weighing 800 lb/ft.’
    • ‘In the air, its high wing and lack of wing struts gave occupants exceptional visibility.’
    • ‘Outside, the wave shapes are secured from coastal winds by steel struts, a reference to masts.’
    • ‘His cars would be constructed on a lightweight steel backbone with independent strut suspension all-round.’
    • ‘The struts of the high girders, which plunge down from the top like the tracks of a rollercoaster, are not absolutely straight.’
    • ‘I laughed as the landing struts slowly eased off the ground.’
    • ‘Mazda also added a strut tower bar to help stiffen up the chassis.’
    • ‘A horizontal V-shaped strut overhangs the old balustrade, suspended from a series of steel bowstring arches.’
    • ‘Two wide wing bracing struts were built from steel tube and balsa wood and fabric covered.’
    • ‘I cannot conceive that the connector strut would be positioned out of the common cylindrical surface.’
    • ‘Each wheel was carried in a fork formed by a pair of hydraulic shock absorber struts.’
    rod, pole, stake, stick, batten, shaft, shank, rail, pale, paling, spar, strut, support, prop, spoke, crosspiece, girder, beam, boom
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  • 2in singular A stiff, erect, and apparently arrogant or conceited gait.

    ‘that old confident strut and swagger has returned’
    • ‘True, Townsend's famous leaps across stage are more of a strut after 35 years, but the old windmill chords are still there.’
    • ‘Her run had slowed into a cocky strut.’
    • ‘Within seconds it stutters its way into a samba breakdown and reggae strut before galloping to a repeat.’
    • ‘No one had his look, his air of total confidence and that cocky strut.’
    • ‘In a way, I had been in love with him since the moment I saw him on the dock, walking towards us with that confidant strut.’
    • ‘He restored the city's confidence in local government, and this put a strut in the city's step.’
    • ‘He walked along with the confident strut that many athletes have.’
    • ‘English - or, to be more accurate, American - is the one and only language of rock 'n' roll's strut and swagger.’
    • ‘Juan has that arrogant and elegant strut about him when he plays which all world-class players have.’
    strut, parading, roll, prancing
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verb

  • 1no object, with adverbial Walk with a stiff, erect, and apparently arrogant or conceited gait.

    ‘peacocks strut through the grounds’
    • ‘She normally sat at the opposite end of the room, but had strutted over, sashaying her hips to talk with him.’
    • ‘After basic training, the two had strutted like peacocks before family and friends.’
    • ‘Archer does tend to strut around rather arrogantly, and on this occasion his behaviour was inappropriate.’
    • ‘The arrogance is masterful as Hicks struts, peacock like, around the stage, posing and displaying his wounded body.’
    • ‘He struts with imperial stride to the wharf and down center stage.’
    • ‘She struts peacock-like from one side of the stage to the other, gripping the pole like a chair-lift banister.’
    • ‘He bowed and walked off briskly through the ticket barriers, strutting like some sort of peacock.’
    • ‘For the finale, fishy similarities of Christina Aguilera and Missy Elliott strut and prance, while the real-life divas sing through the closing credits.’
    • ‘Russ waddled in a feeble stride as the daughter strutted with a youthful arrogance.’
    • ‘At Prestonfield you watch peacocks strut around manicured lawns before retiring to amazing stuccoed rooms.’
    • ‘If the studs strutted around exposing their biceps, women simply walked away with the honours.’
    • ‘Another guy walked in, strutting towards the group.’
    • ‘A noisy courtship begins in earnest in November, with squawking, prancing, and strutting.’
    • ‘However in my opinion he is nothing but an over glorified peacock the way he struts around the school like he owns it.’
    • ‘They go against armed forces numbering 120,000, armed with AK 47s and strutting with pride and arrogance.’
    • ‘Without another word he rose from the ground and strutted out of the room leaving her to think of the words he had just said.’
    • ‘Peacocks strutted about the vast hall, displaying fine plumage and lustrous silks to everyone in the room.’
    • ‘Jaelyn whispered in Brooke's ear as Hugh walked, no, strutted into the room.’
    • ‘They prance and strut in front of the mirrors, as if their fairy godmother has waved her wand and said: ‘You shall go to the ball!’’
    • ‘Watching him strut confidently through the role is a joy.’
    swagger, swank, parade, prance, flounce, stride, sweep
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  • 2with object Brace (something) with a strut or struts.

    ‘the holes were close-boarded and strutted’
    brace, tether, wire, prop, support, truss, buttress, shore up, stake, stick
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Phrases

  • strut one's stuff

    • informal Dance or behave in a confident and expressive way.

      • ‘Elsewhere the Bratton School Dance Club strutted their stuff with Olympic and English numbers.’
      • ‘He looked the opposite way and witnessed groups of men and women at the dance stage, strutting their stuff.’
      • ‘They can be found strutting their stuff in the Community Centre on Monday nights at 8.30 pm.’
      • ‘Badminton takes centre-stage on Friday nights with children on court from 7.30 to 9pm and adults strutting their stuff between 9 and 11 pm.’
      • ‘And the Swindon-born marketing co-ordinator is now confident that she is one step closer to strutting her stuff on the catwalk.’
      • ‘Stuff yourself while live dancers strut their stuff to Brazillian rhythms.’
      • ‘In 1985, aged 20, she met her future husband while strutting her stuff on the dance floor and they were married four years later.’
      • ‘Rap music reigned in the background, and others were on the dance floor, strutting their stuff.’
      • ‘The trendy teens won't be the only ones strutting their stuff on the streets of Ballina during the Shopping Festival.’
      • ‘It's a light-hearted beginning to the season, offering a chance for students to strut their stuff in a play that's pure fun.’

Origin

Old English strūtian ‘protrude stiffly’, of Germanic origin. Current senses date from the late 16th century.

Pronunciation

strut

/strət//strət/