Definition of street in English:

street

noun

  • 1A public road in a city or town, typically with houses and buildings on one or both sides.

    ‘the narrow, winding streets of Greenwich Village’
    [in place names] ‘45 Lake Street’
    • ‘The streets of the cities and the roads of the country as a whole are dominated by workers and the poor.’
    • ‘Does the county council care nothing for our freedom to use the streets of our town?’
    • ‘It might take the form of a large open space, or be held along one or more streets of the town.’
    • ‘It should make it possible for commuters to be able to talk and text beneath the city streets.’
    • ‘It will be the first time that many streets in the town will have received this type of service.’
    • ‘The number of coffee shops in our city streets has multiplied in the last few years.’
    • ‘She was the second vice girl to be killed on the town's streets in less than six months.’
    • ‘It tends to focus on the city centre, with its wide streets and huge civic buildings.’
    • ‘Mr Ellis said he hoped to set up a patrol group to watch over the village streets.’
    • ‘We shall also be holding a public march through the streets of York in the next few weeks.’
    • ‘There is a chase through the streets of the city that will blow what remains of your mind.’
    • ‘The amount of chewing gum stuck on roads and streets around the country drives me up the wall.’
    • ‘Groups of youths roam the streets at night but there are not enough police to keep an eye on the place.’
    • ‘Do you know how hard it is to walk through the shattered streets of my city and see how hard it fell?’
    • ‘He said extra police would be on the town's streets while the crime is investigated.’
    • ‘He had had to make a conscious effort to learn the streets and roads in the city.’
    • ‘You will find them in every hostel and roaming the streets of our major cities and towns.’
    • ‘It has become impossible to pass through streets and roads at night because of dogs.’
    • ‘He was caught behind the wheel of a stolen car after a chase through the city's streets.’
    • ‘He steps outside and heads into town and the streets are awash with frustrated fans.’
    road, thoroughfare, way
    avenue, drive, row, crescent, terrace, close, parade
    side street, side road, lane, alley
    boulevard
    highway, strip, blacktop
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1the streetUS Used to refer to the financial markets and activities on Wall Street.
      • ‘Everybody on Wall Street knows that this firm does by far the best equity research on the Street.’
      • ‘Vilify the Street all you want but the fact remains that the top 10% of income earners provide over 70% of the U.S. Government Tax Revenue.’
    2. 1.2the street/streets The roads or public areas of a city or town.
      ‘every week, fans stop me in the street’
      • ‘The morning of our High Court appearance a huge crowd of students held up the streets.’
      • ‘Forty years ago it was rare to see young girls drunk in the streets; now it is common.’
      • ‘If an animal bites or is vicious it is put to sleep so why let any convicted murderer roam our streets?’
      • ‘My visit to the city was marred by all the British stag and hen parties clogging up the streets.’
      • ‘We should all have pride in our city, an important aspect of which is clean streets.’
      • ‘They try their best to catch out the people who do not clean up after their pets and blight the streets.’
      • ‘The havoc which was wrought by these youths on American streets is all too obvious.’
      • ‘The streets of Colchester will be treated to a flavour of the continent from tonight.’
      • ‘The three of them rushed out onto the streets and told the grand news to anyone that they passed.’
      • ‘The other morning on my way to work there was a sight up to now rare on the Sofia streets.’
      • ‘Besides the stalls, the streets are lined with every kind of shop you could imagine.’
      • ‘Garbage piled up in the streets and the place became a byword for dirt and danger.’
      • ‘The sky is grey and unemployment is high, and the streets are awash with plastic bags.’
      • ‘I was living on one meal for two days and I roamed the streets in search of wretched work.’
      • ‘Children will be given the chance to use the climbing wall in an effort to get them off the streets.’
      • ‘I walk round this town a lot and despair when I see the state of the streets and pavements.’
      • ‘The accepted truth is to say that if it hadn't there would have been a bloodbath in the streets.’
      • ‘The area tends to be quite clean and we have people once a week picking up the rubbish off of the streets.’
      • ‘I want to reclaim the streets for the young and the old and for all the decent people of Britain.’
      • ‘Smokers are being pushed out onto the streets as the vast majority cannot smoke at work.’
    3. 1.3[as modifier] Relating to the outlook, values, or lifestyle of those young people who are perceived as composing a fashionable urban subculture.
      ‘New York City street culture’
      • ‘Indulge in a celebration of 80s New York street style.’
      • ‘The subject is not identified, except by street culture icons, such as his bike and leathers.’
      • ‘The music we were playing was aspirational, not kiddie pop, not cheesy Euro-dance, but based more on street culture.’
      • ‘Those wanting to tap into street culture should look no further than this magazine.’
      • ‘Even baseball has been translated into an urban street sport with stickball.’
      • ‘His car looked out of place and his use of urban street lingo was confusing.’
      • ‘But they don't exist as far as popular black street culture or white liberals are concerned.’
      • ‘Not being deeply immersed in street culture, I don't know how widespread it is.’
      • ‘More than just something to put on your feet, sneakers have been part of street culture, sports and fashion for decades.’
      • ‘Now the hip-hop, street style clothes are in, only a few specialty stores will still carry what you want.’
      • ‘He saw how cinema, music and street style were indivisible.’
      • ‘When you go to music industry events, you find people who say they want to represent this urban music, this street thing.’
      • ‘In too many comprehensives street culture is in the playground and the classroom - to the detriment of the children's education.’
      • ‘It's Chopper Bicycles, the naff 1970's street culture mean machines.’
      • ‘The students drew inspiration from the high street, sport, film and street culture to produce their collections.’
      • ‘The leaders' language is hate, violence and propaganda; street culture is violence and hate.’
      • ‘Take trainers - long the touchstone in an ever-shifting street culture.’
      • ‘Besides, the joke, to many, seemed more at the expense of his middle-class white victims than black street culture.’
      • ‘New York was totally hip hop-driven, dominated by street culture and breakdancing.’
      • ‘The emphasis is on street style, toys, graphics, music and clothing.’
    4. 1.4[as modifier] Denoting someone who is homeless.
      ‘he ministered to street people in storefront missions’
      • ‘I've been involved in ministry to street people in different ways for many years.’
      • ‘Roaming bands of homeless street children engaged in petty crime are now common in Argentine cities.’
      • ‘The perception that many people have of street beggars and the homeless is that they are a bunch of alcoholics or drug addicts.’
      • ‘Concerns have been raised that unless something is done quickly, the problem of street kids will be too heavy to handle for the nation.’
      • ‘Ban unroadworthy vehicles, set up a fund to provide food and shelter for the street children and homeless, and ban litter!’
      • ‘The western block was home to street kids, the middle to older homeless men, and the east was a cruising ground for male prostitutes.’
      • ‘This scenario led to the problem of homeless children commonly known as street kids.’
      • ‘IT is encouraging to see efforts being made either to rehabilitate runaway children, also called street kids.’
      • ‘He spoke to me as a homeless street kid, and he continues to do so.’
      • ‘Compare that with the likes of the block and street people of today who induce school children into all kinds and forms of criminal activity.’
      • ‘He also says the new generation of street kid is less violent and more likely to squeegee and do break-and-entries for money.’
      • ‘The attacks are a reminder that if left uncontrolled, street kids could grow not only into robbers but also purveyors of terror.’
      • ‘Some of these street people tell me they have been homeless for years.’
      • ‘We met for the first time in Zimbabwe, where I was working among AIDS-infected people and street children.’
      • ‘About a quarter of our clients are homeless street kids, but the rest live and work in Hollywood.’
      • ‘He had long hair, wild eyes and the look of a street kid.’
      • ‘There, he worked with street kids and people with dependency and other problems, and helped to set up a user-run food bank.’
      • ‘They point to the dwindling numbers of street kids and handicapped persons who make a living by peddling lotteries.’
      • ‘It captures city life with a deliberately gritty touch, showing the lives of street vendors, street kids, and farmers.’
      • ‘Some street person wearing his t-shirt back-to-front and inside out with the tag showing comes up asking for change.’
    5. 1.5[as modifier] Performing or being performed on the street.
      ‘street theater’
      • ‘The group mixes and layers cultures and styles that range from street dance to martial arts.’
      • ‘The dangerous spirit of street performing informs the whole show.’
      • ‘The intimacy and immediacy of street performing comes naturally to the free-spirited songwriter.’
      • ‘Wenner is a performing visual artist who turns the celebratory folk art of street painting into a performance art spectacle.’
      • ‘This performance fuses R & B and hip-hop with street dance and theatre while embracing issues of youth culture.’
      • ‘The street carnival will be fashioned, with support from local artists, after carnivals in Latin America.’
      • ‘It doesn't necessarily mean that you are a big fan of street puppets and culture jamming.’

Origin

Old English strǣt, from late Latin strāta (via) paved (way) feminine past participle of sternere lay down.

Pronunciation:

street

/strēt/