Definition of strangle in English:

strangle

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Squeeze or constrict the neck of (a person or animal), especially so as to cause death.

    ‘the victim was strangled with a scarf’
    • ‘I wanted to grab her by the neck and strangle her.’
    • ‘When I get my hands on her, I'm going to strangle her until her neck is two inches thick!’
    • ‘An urge to strangle the older girl was suppressed.’
    • ‘Jason wrestled the weapon from his foe's hands, and, right there, strangled him to death.’
    • ‘Then, in some unexplained way, the sprocket chain tore loose and managed to wrap itself about the boy's neck, strangling him.’
    • ‘He had strangled a prostitute to death when she disagreed with him.’
    • ‘Finally, he strangled her to death with a gauze bandage.’
    • ‘I had to severely restrain myself from strangling her right there and then.’
    • ‘The court declared the man guilty of strangling his sister to death with a telephone cord.’
    • ‘He escaped, but his kinsman later strangled him to death.’
    • ‘Sometimes, I felt like strangling him to death.’
    • ‘Alex's cold hands went to Michelle's neck, and strangled her for dear life.’
    • ‘Sara wrapped her legs around Dallas's waist and held on to his neck almost strangling him.’
    • ‘It took all my will power to keep myself from strangling that person to death.’
    • ‘Tatsuya brought his face closer, grabbing Tomoya's neck, strangling him slightly.’
    • ‘She showed them, but the thieves were still unsatisfied and nearly strangled her to death.’
    • ‘Was she smothered, was she strangled, why wasn't there any blood?’
    • ‘She felt as if an invisible hand was upon her neck, strangling her with an iron grip.’
    • ‘Dougal thrust Gino backward into the wall, his fingers tight around his neck, literally strangling him.’
    • ‘But suddenly, she had both hands around his neck and was strangling him.’
    throttle, choke, garrotte
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1as adjective strangled Sounding as though the speaker's throat is constricted.
      ‘a series of strangled gasps’
      • ‘A strangled noise came from the woman's throat.’
      • ‘A strangled laugh escaped her throat as she clung to him tighter, squeezing her eyes shut.’
      • ‘The look on my face combined with the little strangled noises that seemed to come from my throat of their own accord seemed answer enough.’
      • ‘She heard gunshots, loud and sharp through the air and a strangled scream ripped from her throat, as she tasted the dirt.’
      • ‘The second girl made a strangled sound in her throat.’
      • ‘A strangled sob forced its way past my constricted throat muscles.’
      • ‘I felt my fists clenching, my face contorting, feeling, not hearing the burning, strangled sob that clawed its way from my throat.’
      • ‘Arin felt a lump form in the back of his throat, a strangled gasp being all that could escape.’
      • ‘A strangled cry rose in her throat and her eyes grew to the size of saucers.’
      • ‘A strangled scream escaped my throat as the great white shark ripped the protective cage to pieces, as if it was made of matchwood…’
      • ‘As he burst through the surface, his strangled breathing was the only sound other than the rushing water that pulled him farther downstream.’
      • ‘Jen nodded, a strangled sound coming out of her throat that sounded like ‘yes.’’
      • ‘Tielle sat up in bed, her mouth open, a strangled cry escaping her throat, sweat dripping from her.’
      • ‘A choked sound came from my throat, a strangled sound.’
      • ‘I nearly leapt out from my seat, a strangled squeak uttered from somewhere in my throat as an unexpected voice spoke from behind me.’
      • ‘But the silence of the night gave way to strangled sobs in my throat.’
      • ‘She wanted to scream, but a strangled sounding gasp was all that emitted from her.’
      • ‘Althia broke off, emitting a strangled noise in her throat and burying her face in Briar's shoulder.’
      • ‘I uttered a strangled yelp of sheer terror, as the unidentified floating object moved jerkily toward me.’
      • ‘A strangled shriek of rage and panic caught in her throat, and she struggled like a dying fish hooked through the cheek.’
    2. 1.2 Suppress (an impulse, action, or sound)
      ‘she strangled a sob’
      • ‘In the end, the struggle against the central powers exhausted and strangled the impulse to freedom associated with growing equality, and the middle classes succumbed to being administered.’
      • ‘Somehow the thought struck him as extremely funny and he strangled the shout of laughter that arose in his throat.’
      • ‘Every impulse that we strive to strangle broods in the mind, and poisons us… The only way to get rid of a temptation is to yield to it.’
      • ‘The Spearman fought his bitter, convulsive coughs, strangling his sounds against a white-knuckled fist, and Zarantha held his wasted body in her arms.’
      • ‘As high school grad classes of the new millennium file into university, they bring with them a strangled enthusiasm.’
      • ‘When we worry we are strangling the very hope and faith of our future and the achieving of our goals in Christ.’
      • ‘It took all of Emerald's self control to prevent herself from strangling the annoyance.’
      • ‘He strangled the urge to bang his head backwards.’
      • ‘I should be happy, but I'm so overwhelmed by shame, confusion and fear that they are strangling the feelings of love I have for him.’
      • ‘Her voice had shaken badly and more than once, he had caught the sound of her strangling a sob.’
      suppress, smother, stifle, repress, restrain, hold back, hold in, fight back, bite back, gulp back, swallow, choke back, check
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    3. 1.3 Hamper or hinder the development or activity of.
      ‘overrestrictive policies that strangle growth’
      • ‘I have firm proposals to reduce the bureaucracy which is strangling farming.’
      • ‘His family acquired wealth beyond their wildest dreams and a measure of power that still strangles the development of democracy in Chile.’
      • ‘The strategic struggle for Afghanistan was a fight to strangle the other's logistics.’
      • ‘Business is telling us that an assembly would strangle growth.’
      • ‘She believes that the new measures could be valuable but said there was a risk that the benefits could be strangled by bureaucracy and costs.’
      • ‘In practice, their lives are devoured by activities and strangled with attachments.’
      • ‘Is that strangling the nascent ‘alarm tone’ market?’
      • ‘If it were true, it would strangle any hopes for better relations with the United States.’
      • ‘It says less about the logic of reform than about the poverty of a debate that's strangled by interest groups and ideology on both sides.’
      • ‘Their interests diverge from ours, and their control over the network strangles our ability to communicate.’
      • ‘Put a face to the obscene greed that's strangling our beloved country!’
      • ‘In the end, the fear of ideas strangles the drama, because it renders the film's protagonists' struggle to survive devoid of larger meaning.’
      • ‘Economies die more slowly, strangled by fear and despair.’
      • ‘Why should excess consumption strangle economic growth?’
      • ‘The pattern is familiar: vested interests rage against change and do their best to strangle it by cynically invoking such shibboleths as tradition, the family and the sanctity of Sunday.’
      • ‘Plans have been drawn up to safeguard Cumbria's thriving local meat industry from being strangled by bureaucracy.’
      • ‘Is this country so bound up in red tape that compassion has been strangled?’
      • ‘Then the Nigerians will fan across Monrovia, seize the port and allow humanitarian access to the strangled city.’
      • ‘In Wharton's world, other people and the rigid expectations of stratified society conspire to strangle individual happiness.’
      • ‘As Radcliffe shattered a world record in each one it appeared that she became more and more strangled by her own expectations and those of others.’
      hamper, hinder, impede, restrict, interfere with, inhibit, hold back, curb, check, restrain, constrain
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: shortening of Old French estrangler, from Latin strangulare, from Greek strangalan, from strangalē ‘halter’, related to strangos ‘twisted’.

Pronunciation

strangle

/ˈstraNGɡəl//ˈstræŋɡəl/