Definition of stranger in English:

stranger

noun

  • 1A person whom one does not know or with whom one is not familiar.

    ‘don't talk to strangers’
    ‘she remained a stranger to him’
    • ‘For the most part we are strangers sharing rooms.’
    • ‘The man was about ninety, and really not my type at all, besides being a complete stranger.’
    • ‘Even adults who are strangers are expected to intervene and challenge young people behaving in an anti-social manner.’
    • ‘One other local joined us, but everyone else that turned up were strangers.’
    • ‘Still I was a little bit worried that I had been reckless to accept hospitality from a complete stranger.’
    • ‘These are strangers, people we don't know, who ordinarily will pass us straight on the road.’
    • ‘Would you be open and honest about your financial affairs to a complete stranger?’
    • ‘He was known to smile, wave and say hello to people in the streets, whether they were strangers, or long-time neighbours.’
    • ‘Instead, you have to deal with new cellmates, who are strangers at best and troublemakers sent to keep you company at worst.’
    • ‘Five minutes into the conversation I felt as if I was talking to a complete stranger.’
    • ‘Almost all other artistes in the college campus are strangers.’
    • ‘These girls were strangers too, but they thought he was hilarious.’
    • ‘I recognised all sorts of people in the queue - though most were strangers.’
    • ‘Though those on board were strangers, without fail we exchanged friendly greetings.’
    • ‘All of them are strangers who have in some way irritated me beyond reason.’
    • ‘Manderson makes it clear that there are strangers within our midst in the form of the poor and the marginalised as well as the strangers at our door.’
    • ‘We are strangers as much to each other as to this place.’
    • ‘In fact, a lot of times, we're teaching our children to run to a police officer or a fire fighter, and in fact they are strangers.’
    • ‘The jury heard that the two women were strangers and had been drinking.’
    • ‘For example, you as husband and wife met as adults but were strangers before that.’
    1. 1.1 A person who does not know, or is not known in, a particular place or community.
      ‘I'm a stranger in these parts’
      ‘he must have been a stranger to the village’
      • ‘Hardly any contributor will be a stranger to consumers of the financial history literature.’
      • ‘Should I have been a stranger to York I may have found the painted aerial mural of the city a little confusing.’
      • ‘Dozens of members were also quizzed in a bid to jog memories and possibly identify anyone who may have been a stranger to the club.’
      • ‘Many Muslims have fled to neighbouring states where they are strangers and don't always know the local language.’
      • ‘Whenever there is strangers in the area, they can feel it.’
      • ‘When women marry they often move over long distances into households where they are strangers.’
      • ‘Mirza, like most romantic heroes, was a stranger to Sahiban's land and belonged to a feuding clan.’
      • ‘Though he grew up in Ligonier, Corbett is not a stranger to the Seward and Armagh areas.’
      • ‘He was a stranger to these parts. No one knew for sure what to make of him.’
      • ‘I also came as a stranger to Bolivia to work and to tend people and use my knowledge to help them.’
      • ‘Unfortunately, as a stranger to this small town, I did not know the local resources.’
      • ‘The harsh winter which had swept over this famous city was over, although someone who was a stranger to this town would have thought otherwise.’
      • ‘Our taxi driver hadn't uttered a word thus far, not even the acknowledgement of knowing where he was taking us, who were strangers in the big unwelcome city.’
      • ‘Small children smiled happily at us who were strangers in their town.’
      • ‘If you don't know Danny Burke around Castlerea, you sure are a stranger to the region!’
      • ‘We are strangers here and some of us speak no English.’
      • ‘Once, as we were strangers there, a local policeman asked us for identification, which my mother could not supply.’
      • ‘Not that Davies's caution in talking about her new job results from her being a stranger to the world of medical management and policy making.’
      • ‘Knowing that they exist in those parts it didn't come as a shock, but if I was a stranger to the area it would probably have thrown me.’
      • ‘He was a stranger to Scotland until he married the daughter of the 17th Earl of Sutherland.’
      unknown person
      newcomer, new arrival, incomer
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2stranger to A person entirely unaccustomed to (a feeling, experience, or situation)
      ‘he is no stranger to controversy’
      • ‘Gregg is no stranger to the open road and he experienced his first tour when he was only seven months old.’
      • ‘The Germans and French will seek to maintain the status quo but McCreevy is no stranger to bruising political battles.’
      • ‘Mrs Marshall is no stranger to the skies, as she held a private pilot's licence in the past, and has been a passenger on microlight trips before.’
      • ‘Geraldton's new Detective Sergeant Simon Hubbard is no stranger to country policing.’
      • ‘Michael is no stranger to success in this section as he perennially produces the best vegetables for the various shows.’
      • ‘No matter that a good percentage of the congregation were strangers to any church or that the local drunks rolled in to help us celebrate.’
      • ‘Romans were strangers to the classical tradition; Mozart and Beethoven were never performed, and there were no public concerts.’
      • ‘Hann who is ranked 22 in the world, is no stranger to controversy.’
      • ‘Denise is no stranger to rallying either and she started co-driving in 1996 for Peter Dobbyn.’
      • ‘The bulk of the crowd tonight is in its early thirties and few of them, judging by their appearance, are strangers to happy hours in shopping-mall pubs.’
      • ‘Mr Rooney, who has 46 years of experience working with plant machinery under his belt, is no stranger to working abroad.’
      • ‘As a widely traveled religious leader, the Pope is no stranger to controversy.’
      • ‘Andrew is no stranger to rubbing shoulders with the great and the good.’
      • ‘Ted Fitzgerald is no stranger to the greyhound scene, having bred many a winner from his Ballyhaunis kennels.’
      • ‘However Jason is no stranger to success, albeit at Youth League level.’
      • ‘No stranger to the community games Sean is wished every success in the finals.’
      • ‘Not that Pramod Mohan and Prameeda Mohan are strangers to the canvas.’
      • ‘Always wanting more, their sense of accomplishment is ephemeral and they are strangers to contentment.’
      • ‘She is no stranger to the courts and has had some other experience in conducting a trial.’
      • ‘Cecile is no stranger to dancing as she was part of the dancing scene in her native Brittany before moving to Ireland to make her home here.’
      unaccustomed to, unfamiliar with, unused to, unacquainted with, new to, fresh to, inexperienced in, unpractised in, unversed in, unconversant with
      strange to
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: shortening of Old French estrangier, from Latin extraneus (see strange).

Pronunciation

stranger

/ˈstrānjər/