Definition of storm in English:



  • 1A violent disturbance of the atmosphere with strong winds and usually rain, thunder, lightning, or snow.

    • ‘For winemakers in the Rhone, 2002 was a disastrous year, with violent storms and huge rainfall during the harvest.’
    • ‘Over the past week lightning storms and heavy rain have caused a lot of problems, especially with holidaymakers and visitors.’
    • ‘He was standing in the middle of a storm; rain and wind battering his body.’
    • ‘But the storm's winds and rain are still pretty much pounding that area.’
    • ‘Yesterday France was battered by storms and strong winds.’
    • ‘It was pitch black outside, and the ground was dry and cracked, as if the storm had produced lightning but no rain.’
    • ‘The middle part of the month saw an increase in the number of storms and some very strong winds.’
    • ‘This can lead to heavy and prolonged rain or storms in these areas, and possible flash flooding.’
    • ‘The night was getting darker and the rain harder, and no car went by, the storm was so strong he could hardly see a few feet ahead of him.’
    • ‘However, I can already hear the thunder and lightning unleashing the fierce storm of the year.’
    • ‘The storms also brought strong winds and frequent lightning, we are told.’
    • ‘The storm's winds were strong enough to uproot trees and to knock people off their feet.’
    • ‘Hampshire was battered by high-speed winds and heavy rain yesterday as violent storms hit the county.’
    • ‘In addition, there are strong winds and heavy storms in the region, particularly during winter.’
    • ‘These kinds of storms can produce rain, hail snow, thunder and lightning.’
    • ‘He also had an uncanny feel for the weather and many times accurately predicted a day of storms, especially violent thunderstorms and tornadoes.’
    • ‘The weather is unpredictable, with violent gales and storms having resulted in countless shipping casualties over the years, continuing right up to the present.’
    • ‘About an hour after my arrival the storm arrived with rain, lightning and thunder.’
    • ‘As well as bringing milder winters and hotter summers, warmer weather could trigger more rain, fiercer winds and more frequent storms.’
    • ‘The recent thunder and lightning storm was the worst of its kind seen in the area for many years.’
    tempest, squall
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1An intense low-pressure weather system; a cyclone.
      • ‘Most of the South is sunny, but we do have one storm system that's pulling across the northern plains.’
      • ‘The storm system delivering those temperatures is also expected to drop light snow from the Great Lakes to New England.’
      • ‘This same storm system hit the edge of Wilber and destroyed several area homes and farmsteads.’
      • ‘The whole storm system may be up to 10 miles high and on average 500 miles wide.’
      • ‘In the West, there's a big storm system that's rolling into the coast.’
      • ‘That same storm system caused flooding in roads and homes across central Ohio.’
      • ‘The storm system is still causing flash floods along the Atlantic coast.’
      • ‘The storm system is dumping rain as far south as central Pennsylvania and as far north as Ontario, Canada.’
      • ‘A storm system raging across Western Europe continued to wreak havoc in the air and sea yesterday, bringing down an Italian helicopter and sinking an Italian cargo ship loaded with chemicals.’
      • ‘The severe storm system is expected to move further east into Pennsylvania and New York later this week.’
      • ‘Travelers across the country saw delays and long lines at airports as a major storm system moved into the Great Lakes region.’
      • ‘A massive storm system is expected to slam into the coast, bringing heavy rain and flooding.’
      • ‘Now this storm system has delayed flights in Atlanta, Chicago, Ohio and elsewhere.’
      • ‘Voyager observed lightning from an extended storm system at low latitudes, which lasted for months and appeared highly regular from one day to the next.’
      • ‘That storm system is now progressing on a northeasterly course, but it is weakening quickly.’
      • ‘The pictures clearly show Jupiter's swirling cloud bands and the planet's famous Red Spot - thought to be a giant storm system.’
      • ‘After generating tornadoes during the weekend, the storm system continued toward the east and south yesterday, producing heavy rain along an arc from Louisiana to Virginia.’
      • ‘A storm system late last week brought welcome precipitation and limited relief to north central and northeast Nebraska, often with 2-4 inches of rain.’
      • ‘They had been trying to recall us because of a fast-moving storm system working its way from the north.’
      • ‘There's a cyclonic storm in the Bay of Bengal, about 600 km east southeast of Chennai.’
    2. 1.2A wind of force 10 on the Beaufort scale (48–55 knots or 55-63 mph)
      • ‘A spokesman for the Met Office in Manchester said the winds were storm force, but the gusts were up to 85 mph.’
      • ‘In the early part of the month the Co. Down coast was battered by one of the worst storms for a number of years with easterly winds gusting up to severe storm force 11.’
      • ‘HMS Cumberland has sent back dramatic pictures of a mission to help an Icelandic trawler which was being battered by a Force 10 storm.’
      • ‘The passage from Ireland was quite rough with the vessel encountering storm force winds and high seas for days crossing the Bay of Biscay.’
      • ‘Whether it is the middle of the night or a force 10 storm, the platform keeps producing oil and gas.’
      • ‘As the storm force winds abated late on Thursday evening conditions did improve in most areas.’
      • ‘Fire crews in south and mid Pembrokeshire were inundated with calls over the weekend as storm force winds caused havoc across the county.’
      • ‘Elsewhere in the county, fire crews had a relatively quiet weekend despite the storm force winds.’
      • ‘The storm blew at full force, and the lightning was getting closer.’
      • ‘Travelling back to Orkney around 7.45 pm, the ferry lost power to its bow thruster and was left drifting in storm force winds.’
      • ‘Heaving surf tore away a lifeguard tower at Windmill Beach and storm force winds reaching 40 mph destroyed a bus shelter.’
      • ‘The lifeboat launched in storm force 10-12 winds to help a stricken yacht, the Dasher, which was adrift with three people on board.’
      • ‘The storm force winds caused the snow on the Galtees to drift and accumulate and at the time of writing huge drifts are visible on the mountain slopes.’
      • ‘The weather took a turn for the worse as a fierce force 11 storm forced the convoy to disperse over a wide area.’
    3. 1.3A heavy discharge of missiles or blows.
      ‘two men were taken by a storm of bullets’
      • ‘The referee halted the fight in the final round after a storm of blows followed a standing eight count early in the early seconds of the round.’
      • ‘I saw Wyatt pummeling Adrian under a storm of blows and I began to understand why I had not found a calling card from Ace.’
      • ‘The Columbia opened fire with full battery salvoes, disgorging a storm of blue-white plasma fire into the separate targets.’
      • ‘His sidekick dies in a storm of gunfire while the don and his aide's wife are critically wounded.’
      • ‘You see scores of soldiers charge straight into storms of bullets, but they're just going to get shot and killed anyway.’
      • ‘Sighing, she jumped on top of the rock and was immediately blown backwards by a storm of fire.’
      • ‘The hail of bullets was tremendous, and the squad hesitated amidst the storm.’
      volley, salvo, fusillade, barrage, discharge, shower, spray, hail, rain
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  • 2[usually in singular] A tumultuous reaction; an uproar or controversy.

    ‘the book caused a storm in South America’
    ‘she has been at the center of a storm concerning payments’
    • ‘The reality right now is that if you try the second project first, you may find yourself at the center of a furious storm.’
    • ‘However, a new poll suggests that the 39-year-old's public appeal has not been affected by the storm over drugs.’
    • ‘Tim should also see his way through to retirement, despite the storm engulfing the drugs industry.’
    • ‘Closer to home, the Irish Times, once the stately ship of Irish journalism, continues to be battered by storms and controversy.’
    • ‘But the man at the center of the storm sits calmly in his office just a few doors down from the president's, playing down reports of a rift.’
    • ‘At the center of the storm, the Federal Bureau of Investigation is facing a new round of scrutiny over warnings that went unheeded.’
    • ‘He created a storm of sorts in the 1966 autumn-winter collection when he had his women models in tuxedos, absolutely unheard of till then.’
    • ‘This was my first exposure to the raging storm of the creation-day controversy.’
    • ‘We'll talk to the journalist at the center of the storm, David Wright.’
    uproar, commotion, furore, brouhaha, trouble, disturbance, hue and cry, upheaval
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    1. 2.1A violent or noisy outburst of a specified feeling or reaction.
      ‘the disclosure raised a storm of protest’
      • ‘But he has provoked a storm of opposition from islanders, politicians and mountaineers, who dispute his right to put such a national treasure on the market.’
      • ‘This was reported in the newspapers and aroused a storm of public criticism.’
      • ‘Despite the heavy secrecy imposed on this radical program, a storm of opposition will be hard to avoid.’
      • ‘The news caused a storm of protest, particularly from rail unions.’
      • ‘Howard's remarks set off a storm of controversy.’
      • ‘When Dylan himself decided to make the transition from folk hero to electric messiah, he found himself at the centre of a storm of protest.’
      • ‘The scheme was set for the go-ahead on Thursday but councillors decided to defer it for a site visit following a storm of objections from villagers.’
      • ‘Looking more like a documentary than a typical TV drama, the films provoked a storm of outrage.’
      • ‘Last night, his comments prompted a storm of criticism from the sporting world, including football.’
      • ‘When radio jockeys aired a hitherto-unknown singer, little did they know that his voice would raise a storm of appreciation.’
      • ‘They toured extensively, creating a storm of enthusiasm at packed venues and festivals across America, Canada, Europe and Australia.’
      • ‘It is heavily laced with tension, drama and passion, as all three characters collide in a storm of passion, revenge and ultimately tragedy.’
      • ‘A storm of protest blew up after council officials released critical figures just hours before a crunch meeting.’
      • ‘The remarks led to a storm of protest, but Connell refused to back down.’
      • ‘After a storm of protest, the conservation group agreed to talk to animal welfare groups to see if there was a way to save both hedgehogs and birds.’
      • ‘When she released her first album in 1994, a storm of controversy erupted.’
      • ‘The proposals for extra drinking time were met with a storm of protest from neighbours who said it would fuel late-night noise.’
      • ‘Plans for a hotel in the heart of Sheffield seem likely to be rubber-stamped despite a storm of opposition.’
      • ‘Vancouverites wage a private war against Torontonians in a storm of jealousy and rivalry of which Toronto is completely unaware.’
      • ‘Naturally, the governor's comments raised a storm of criticism, especially from those groups representing ethnic Koreans.’
      outburst, outbreak, explosion, eruption, outpouring, surge, upsurge, avalanche, torrent, flood, deluge
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  • 3North American Storm windows.

  • 4A direct assault by troops on a fortified place.

    • ‘The third, and presumably most venturesome of all castle assaults was the storm.’
    assault, attack, onslaught, offensive, charge, raid, foray, sortie, rush, descent, incursion, thrust, push, blitz, blitzkrieg, aggression
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  • 1[no object] Move angrily or forcefully in a specified direction.

    ‘she burst into tears and stormed off’
    ‘he stormed out of the house’
    • ‘She grabbed a cup of punch and stormed angrily over to Liam.’
    • ‘He then turned on his heel and stormed off in the direction of the cucumber sandwiches.’
    • ‘About that time, Taylor stormed into the room, tears filling her eyes.’
    • ‘My eyes filled with tears as I stormed down the hall to my room.’
    • ‘With those words he stormed off in the direction of Brad but I don't think it was to go after him.’
    • ‘Sandrine glared angrily at Alex before storming off in the opposite direction.’
    • ‘She whirled around and stormed off in the direction of Mindy's house.’
    • ‘I wanted to use that look on him myself; what kind of guy leaves his unstable, crying girlfriend in a party full of strangers and doesn't even follow her when she storms out in tears?’
    • ‘Eventually Nicole got the idea and stormed off, tears rolling down her face.’
    • ‘She hurled it at him forcefully before storming out of his room.’
    • ‘She storms over while I'm talking to the customer and say she wants to see me when I'm done.’
    • ‘At last, Cora and Arlan broke away and stormed off in opposite directions.’
    • ‘Em's eyes brimmed with tears and she stormed out of the room.’
    • ‘The conversation deteriorated into calling each other daft names and I moved to storm out of his office with one final remark.’
    • ‘Sophie flung her scarf and coat in frustration across the hall and stormed angrily upstairs to change her soaked jeans.’
    • ‘Andrea stormed out, tears and sobs could be heard from outside.’
    • ‘Later she stormed angrily into the room and snapped at James to leave.’
    • ‘They promptly blamed each other for driving him away, and stormed off in opposite directions in the vain hope of finding their way back to the palace.’
    • ‘He stormed away and angrily made the latte, spilling most of the ingredients all over his hands and the counter.’
    • ‘Celia burst into tears and stormed off into the distance.’
    stride angrily, stomp, march, charge, stalk, flounce, stamp, fling
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    1. 1.1[with direct speech]Shout (something) angrily; rage.
      ‘“Don't patronize me!” she stormed’
      rant, rave, rant and rave, shout, bellow, roar, thunder, rage, explode
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    2. 1.2Move forcefully and decisively to a specified position in a game or contest.
      ‘he barged past and stormed to the checkered flag’
      • ‘Biarritz dominated for over an hour but came agonisingly close to throwing it away after Ulster stormed back into the game.’
      • ‘However they stormed into the game in the second half, scored 4-4 and confined the opposition to just two points.’
      • ‘The local team proved to be a class apart in claiming its sixth championship overall, storming ahead in both games to be in full control by the time the half-time whistle arrived.’
      • ‘But the coaches worked on him and he stormed back in game two to draw level as Ramy, perhaps, relaxed a little.’
      • ‘World number one Lleyton Hewitt stormed past Michael Chang at the Japan Open, on what may prove to be the Chinese-American's last tournament appearance in Asia.’
      • ‘After patting his mount on the neck and pulling his ears, Culhane was a sitting duck to the enterprisingly-ridden Kahalah, who stormed past him near the finish to win by a length.’
      • ‘Kiltimagh stormed back into the game in the second half and Adrian Walsh had a stormer when moved to centre-field.’
      • ‘Kendal's relay team of Mark, Peter, James and Peter stormed to first position with a time of 48.9s.’
      • ‘But Ballintubber stormed into the game and outscored their opponents by six points to one in the final minutes.’
      • ‘Lismore were playing with fierce determination, however, and they stormed back into the game.’
      • ‘His club colleague James Callery, now operating at centre-forward, came storming into the game in the final 10 minutes.’
      • ‘This was a facile victory for the girls who stormed into the game from the tip-off and dominated their opponents in every sector to seal a great win.’
      • ‘Connelly was again on target to complete his hat-trick and put Forres in a winning position but Nairn stormed back with goals from Gary Farquhar and a winner from Kellacher.’
      • ‘With Larry Mahon playing well at midfield, Castledermot stormed back into the game.’
      • ‘But Carroll's superior race craft came though on lap ten when he stormed past them both and up to ninth at one of the two race re-starts.’
      • ‘As expected, Kimi Raikkonen stormed to the pole position for the tomorrow's German Grand Prix at Hockenheim and he has the first chance to take the win tomorrow.’
      • ‘It was an impressive weekend so far for Ferrari as Michael Schumacher stormed to the pole position for the tomorrow's race.’
      • ‘This break looks like it could be decisive as he storms well clear of the rest of the pack.’
  • 2[with object] (of troops) suddenly attack and capture (a building or other place) by means of force.

    ‘Indian commandos stormed a hijacked plane early today’
    ‘the storming of the Bastille’
    • ‘The siege finally ended the following day when troops stormed the building.’
    • ‘The town was bombed, and stormed by troops who were prepared to fire on anything that moved.’
    • ‘This is an event meant to honour the Americans, British and Canadians who stormed the beaches of Normandy to liberate France and Europe from the German yoke.’
    • ‘Communist Viet Cong stormed the front gates on April 30, 1975, officially putting an end to nearly 30 years of war.’
    • ‘Although there was stout opposition, the king's men stormed the town and history records that they used the alleyways to reach the town centre where there was some stiff fighting.’
    • ‘Some reports say shooting broke out after a bomb taped to a ceiling inside the school went off accidentally, prompting troops to storm the building.’
    • ‘Eventually police commandos stormed the house after breaking the walls and the roof of one of the rooms.’
    • ‘The beginnings of civil war would later be dated to 5 April 1264, when Henry III's army stormed Northampton.’
    • ‘When the Vistula line was stormed in January 1945, there were no fewer than 6.7 million men in the Soviet forces between the Baltic and the Adriatic.’
    • ‘About 15,000 Canadians stormed the beaches that day, with 350 losing their lives and hundreds more wounded.’
    • ‘The statement from the army said troops would not storm the radio station because they did not want to spark any violence.’
    • ‘They stormed and occupied the beach, but the cost was considerable.’
    • ‘Thai commandos stormed the hospital and killed all nine hostage-takers.’
    • ‘When troops stormed the building, 129 hostages and 41 guerrillas were killed.’
    • ‘Hundreds of children and adults fled when commandos stormed the building.’
    • ‘It wasn't until after the plane landed and was stormed by Indian commandos that the hoax was discovered.’
    • ‘In an attempt to restore control, British troops stormed the headquarters of the movement.’
    • ‘On 21 November 1739 his forces stormed the fortress of Portobello in Panama.’
    • ‘With the help of military deserters, they stormed the prison and forced its surrender, massacring the commander who had fired on them early in the attack.’
    • ‘Eight days later US special forces stormed the hospital, capturing the ‘dramatic’ events on a night vision camera.’
    attack, charge, rush, conduct an offensive on, make an onslaught on, make a foray on, make a raid on, make a sortie on, descend on, take by storm, attempt to capture
    View synonyms
  • 3[no object] (of the weather) be violent, with strong winds and usually rain, thunder, lightning, or snow.

    ‘when it stormed in the day, I shoveled the drive before Harry came home’
    • ‘It was practically dark as we prepared to put the sign onto the posts when a strong wind stormed through bringing an icy rain and hail with it.’
    • ‘It was storming that January night in Waterloo, Ontario.’
    • ‘Right at this moment wind is storming, windows are rattling, tree branches are creaking, and leaves are quivering.’
    • ‘It was storming, lightning flashed across the sky.’
    • ‘This all seems so much more comforting on a grey monsoon day with the wind storming outside and the Mumbai streets in flood.’
    • ‘But Lette still liked to sleep in my room sometimes, when it stormed and we lost power, or after we saw scary movies.’
    • ‘It was raining, storming really, the perfect weather (in my opinion).’
    • ‘If it stormed, we would not find solace under the lonely, stunted bristle-cone pines.’
    • ‘He often provided a roof over my head when it stormed or the snow was deep outside.’
    • ‘It was storming, the rain was making horrible sounds against the window.’
    • ‘That night it stormed again and in the morning they set out through the driving rain, though the thunder and lightning had stopped.’


  • go down a storm

    • Be enthusiastically received by an audience.

      • ‘Amazingly, the film went down a storm among critics who had the chance to catch up with it, in America.’
      • ‘The parade itself went down a storm with the thousands of excited spectators who lined the route of this years St Patrick's Day Parade in glorious sunshine in Killarney.’
      • ‘I flew out on the Sunday morning, did the gig and flew back on the Monday morning, but it went down a storm.’
      • ‘The idea seems to have gone down a storm, not only with audiences, but also with actors - who seem to have been lining up to make cameo appearances.’
      • ‘They went down a storm on the Saturday night and were invited back to appear in the midweek show and were flown over again.’
      • ‘The film has already gone down a storm in America, where it became one of the best-reviewed movies of the year.’
      • ‘It went down a storm in Surrey and I hope it can do the same here.’
      • ‘The rain held off long enough, though, for a happy afternoon which went down a storm with the performers and audience alike.’
      • ‘The pool, with its inflatables and tubular chute, went down a storm, and the play park was an unexpected little treasure, discovered during our evening walk.’
      • ‘But as family entertainment, the whole package seemed to go down a storm with the capacity Friday night audience.’
  • the calm (or lull) before the storm

    • A period of unusual tranquility or stability that seems likely to presage difficult times.

      • ‘She's lucid, for now, but that's how it is with serious smoke inhalation - the calm before the storm.’
      • ‘The current trend might just be a calm before the storm while new powers rise up to become strong enough to eventually challenge the existing world order.’
      • ‘When I turned out the light I had a sense that the day had been the calm before the storm and I was right.’
      • ‘Thanksgiving used to be the calm before the storm, the day to rest before the traditional beginning of the holiday shopping season, a day usually spent at home with family and friends.’
      • ‘I know that the worst is yet to come - this is merely the calm before the storm, so to speak, as January is usually the snowiest month here - so some effective indoor activity would be a good idea.’
      • ‘And yet there is that eerie feeling of the calm before the storm.’
      • ‘It may look this weekend as if nothing is happening, but this is the calm before the storm.’
      • ‘Moreover, I think opponents will look back at the current period as the lull before the storm because forces are at work that should actually boost the movement's progress considerably.’
      • ‘We've not seen this many positive developments for months, although this week will almost certainly prove to be the calm before the storm.’
      • ‘After spending Monday afternoon and evening in the city, I get a feeling I just experienced the calm before the storm.’
  • storm and stress

  • a storm in a teacup

    • British term for a tempest in a teapot (see tempest)
      • ‘It seems a bit of a storm in a teacup to an outsider but maybe within his own professional group it was important to him.’
      • ‘The row makes a storm in a teacup look gargantuan and says much about national pride, international rivalry, the need to justify hugely-expensive research establishments and even, perhaps, the egos of the experimenters.’
      • ‘In my opinion, the whole thing is just a storm in a teacup.’
      • ‘I do not propose to comment on the article as the sooner this storm in a teacup is forgotten the better.’
      • ‘In face of such gloating by the political right, several newspapers have insisted that the whole affair is a storm in a teacup.’
      • ‘Even if it did happen such incidents are commonplace on the training fields of the land, a storm in a teacup quickly sorted and set aside by practical managers.’
      • ‘The other European powers made great play of belittling US fears and giving the appearance that this was a storm in a teacup.’
      • ‘It wasn't corruption, but it wasn't a storm in a teacup either.’
      • ‘All this furore about same-sex marriages seems a storm in a teacup to me.’
      • ‘On the other hand, some of the ‘stories’ that have caused a great deal of excitement are no more than a storm in a teacup.’
      ado, excitement, agitation, uproar, to-do, stir, commotion, confusion, disturbance, tumult, hubbub, rigmarole, folderol, brouhaha, furore, storm in a teacup, much ado about nothing
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  • take something by storm

    • 1(of troops) capture a place by a sudden and violent attack.

      • ‘Because Poole's force was not strong enough to take the town by storm, an anti-Bolshevik rising had to be organized in the town and co-ordinated with the landing.’
      • ‘Things escalate when a SWAT team follow the police onto the scene and the macho head officer threatens to take the place by storm.’
      • ‘Saladin's brother, al-Adil, took the city by storm and sold the entire population into slavery.’
      attack, charge, rush, conduct an offensive on, make an onslaught on, make a foray on, make a raid on, make a sortie on, descend on, take by storm, attempt to capture
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Have great and rapid success in a particular place or with a particular group of people.
        ‘his first collection took the fashion world by storm’
        • ‘It was a vast book of a sprawling nation, and it took the world by storm.’
        • ‘In theatrical terms, it took the world by storm.’
        • ‘In the early nineties a small band of flannelette wearing buddies from Seattle took the world by storm.’
        • ‘Today she is taking the music business by storm.’
        • ‘They took the world by storm, and you just could not believe you were so near to them when they were running on to the stage.’
        • ‘Just as Gregorian chants took the charts by storm in the 1990s, the producer of a new CD of Gaelic psalm singing is hoping to touch the public's heart.’
        • ‘With his strong voice, he impressed the jurors, took the audience by storm and grabbed the title.’
        • ‘Fifty years ago, rock 'n' roll took the music world by storm.’
        • ‘In 1937, they took the racetrack by storm, winning everywhere and lifting a quickly obsessed nation out of its doldrums.’
        • ‘And, just as sushi has been welcomed into the belly of the West (the recipe for the popular California Roll was invented in the States), Japan has recently opened its arms to a new fusion trend taking the country by storm.’
  • —— up a storm

    • Perform the specified action with great enthusiasm and energy.

      ‘the band could really play up a storm’
      • ‘The condition, known to consume women in the late stages of pregnancy, compels heavily pregnant women to cook and clean up a storm.’
      • ‘Anyways, he saw how distressed I was and came over to comfort me because I was crying up a storm.’
      • ‘Susan, despite her initial reservations, danced up a storm.’
      • ‘I went to my friends who were sitting at our table chatting up a storm.’
      • ‘A couple at the table behind us was smoking up a storm and it kept drifting over me.’
      • ‘I'm cooking up a storm - but besides preparing all the food, I need to eat something, too.’
      • ‘Mitch and I are travelling a lot now and we are both writing up a storm.’
      • ‘Marshall didn't speak a word of Spanish before he arrived in Cuba; now he's talking up a storm.’
      • ‘This is a very chatty track with all participants yammering up a storm.’
      • ‘The whole time, I was sweating up a storm, thinking that he'd still frisk me and find the stash in my jeans pocket.’


Old English, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch storm and German Sturm, probably also to the verb stir. The verb dates from late Middle English in storm.