Definition of stop-start in English:

stop-start

(also stop-and-start)

adjective

informal
  • Alternately stopping and starting; progressing with interruptions.

    ‘a $150 stop-start taxi ride’
    • ‘After the thrill of making my debut in Iceland two years ago, my international career has been stop-start.’
    • ‘The unrestrained art of performance is far more fulfilling for him than stop-start filming for television.’
    • ‘Less experienced players could find the game a stop-start journey as they puzzle over what to do next.’
    • ‘Europe's stop-start ski season roared back into life last week, with heavy snowfalls and freezing temperatures affecting almost all of the Alps.’
    • ‘She describes herself as ‘really lazy’ but her stop-start relationship with athletics and her current achievements put a lie to that.’
    • ‘Touring in Normandy is often a stop-start affair, with buildings like this which make you look and linger’
    • ‘The game was strongly contested all through, two totally committed teams going for every ball with intent and this led to a degree of scrappy, stop-start hurling.’
    • ‘We sat late into the night singing, drinking, eating fried mushrooms and stretching a dozen or so words of Magyar into stop-start conversation about horses, whips and dancing.’
    • ‘His reluctance to commit himself to one genre has undoubtedly been a contributing factor to his stop-start success.’
    • ‘This stop-start approach means that more disadvantaged students will give up.’
    • ‘He also pointed out that stop-start driving creates far more pollution than steady speed progress.’
    • ‘We were trying to build into the game, to develop continuity, but it was a very stop-start affair.’
    • ‘Nine goals was not a great tally last year, but it was such a stop-start season for me, with injuries and suspensions.’
    • ‘There is no stop-start recitative singing and the whole work flows along beautifully.’
    • ‘After overtaking he had driven in a stop-start manner and the bus driver had got out and gone to the car's passenger door to talk to the motorist.’
    • ‘From Sunday to Saturday, the storms had kept him off the streets, part of the stop-start nature of his working pattern.’
    • ‘The bus continued its jilted stop-start progression through the streets of Northern London and my eyes wandered again.’
    • ‘When I get in there are envelopes to open for an hour or so and then nothing until about 3.00 pm when the outgoing post arrives, and even then it's stop-start.’
    • ‘It resulted in a stop-start affair when better application of the advantage law would have been more appropriate.’
    • ‘Nevertheless they still retained their sound and crazy stop-start timing, now with a really cool kind of spoken singing with some shouts and yelps.’

Pronunciation:

stop-start

/ˌstäpˈstärt/