Definition of stick shift in US English:

stick shift

noun

North American
  • A manual transmission.

    • ‘Each car has a clutch and stick shift, for drivers born before 1960 who know how to work those.’
    • ‘Seeing her drive a car with a stick shift was kind of amusing.’
    • ‘Sliding beside her father in the drivers seat, she turned the key (which was always left in the ignition, in case of an emergency) pressed on the clutch, and placed the stick shift in neutral.’
    • ‘Here's what you can't get: a two-door cab, a longer bed, a stick shift - which Honda's rivals offer.’
    • ‘And it was stick shift not automatic, another plus.’
    • ‘Somehow he managed to drive his stick shift truck to my place so I could take him to the hospital.’
    • ‘My friend had given me a 15 second briefing on the basic mechanics of a stick shift system, and I was off.’
    • ‘These are popular with US visitors, who dislike the idea of coping with a stick shift and driving on the other side of the road at the same time.’
    • ‘It'll be stick shift for for me for another few years, I'm afraid.’
    • ‘I really want to buy a new Toyota Matrix with a stick shift, but he insists that the front-wheel-drive version (which, of course, is the one I want) is lousy in the snow.’
    • ‘He slides the stick shift into gear then rests his left hand on the wheel, poking a casual right elbow out of the window.’
    • ‘I shall not be able to manage a clutch pedal and stick shift for ever, and I know it.’
    • ‘Letter writing, like driving with a stick shift or baking a cake from scratch, is becoming a lost art.’
    • ‘She has to pay 17 percent interest on her loan (for people with no credit), but at least she got the sunroof, stick shift, and sporty look she wanted.’

Pronunciation

stick shift

/ˈstɪk ˌʃɪft//ˈstik ˌSHift/