Definition of steppe in English:

steppe

noun

  • A large area of flat unforested grassland in southeastern Europe or Siberia.

    • ‘Most of the country is covered by steppes, with desert areas and some patches of cultivated land.’
    • ‘During the following days, we will cross green frozen steppes, sandy deserts, narrow gorges and canyons, and all the guises that mountains are apt to take.’
    • ‘Japan and China are also clashing over the route of a pipeline across the dark forests and frozen steppes of Siberia.’
    • ‘By the mid-sixteenth century Crimea, the southern Russian steppes, the Kazakh steppes, and western Siberia had come under Islamic law.’
    • ‘It is a dry land of mountains and steppes, with some plains in the valleys of the heartland.’
    • ‘The climate is dry and semiarid in the steppes in the middle and eastern parts, subtropical in the southeast, cold in the high mountains in the north, and temperate on the Caspian coast.’
    • ‘The arctic meadows, tundras, and steppes contained the herbaceous plants, leaves, and sprigs of shrubs and low shrubs needed for the mammoth to feed on and survive in glacial Siberia.’
    • ‘Olga was born and grew up on the steppes of southern Siberia.’
    • ‘In the Gobi area, you will find mountains, plains, steppes, forests and barren areas.’
    • ‘A few days later she set off on her own arduous journey to Krasnokamensk - six hours by plane and 10 hours by car across Siberia's desolate steppes.’
    • ‘You must learn the traditions of the plains and steppes.’
    • ‘Much of Uzbekistan's landscape consists of deserts, dry steppes, and fertile oases near rivers.’
    • ‘Swift habitat includes desert oasis, Mediterranean scrub, steppe, farm or grassland, urban areas, forest and canyons.’
    • ‘Human cultures now spread from the subtropical regions into the steppes and temperate climes where the grasses could be selected to provide abundant food.’
    • ‘Across the country extend belts of tundra (in the far north), forest, steppe, and fertile areas.’
    • ‘From the borders of Europe to the frozen steppes of Siberia and the Pacific coastline of Vladivostok, Russia is still geographically a powerful presence despite having shed its Soviet-era neighbours.’
    • ‘The Pope, who aides say is losing sleep over the possibility of war, celebrated a Mass that began with a stiff wind blowing in from Siberia over the flat steppes and ended in sunshine.’
    • ‘Trouble is, we have more than enough food available in America in this day and age, and we're usually not trekking across frozen tundra or arid steppes in search of the next encampment.’
    • ‘The game may have its origin in ancient times, when herds of cattle grazed in the steppes and mountains and were exposed to the threat of attack by wolves.’
    • ‘With these they are able to dramatise plains, prairies, steppes and meadows.’

Origin

Late 17th century: from Russian stepʹ.

Pronunciation:

steppe

/step/