Main definitions of steer in English

: steer1steer2

steer1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 (of a person) guide or control the movement of (a vehicle, vessel, or aircraft), for example by turning a wheel or operating a rudder.

    ‘he steered the boat slowly toward the busy quay’
    [no object] ‘he let Lily steer’
    • ‘It steers her vessel down the river, as if on a predestined course.’
    • ‘This is a very responsive boat and inexperienced operators will need to be careful not to over trim and steer a boat that responds so quickly.’
    • ‘He was unable to row the boat and couldn't steer the vessel having lost his rudder on day one of the voyage.’
    • ‘Boeing has made one such system and used it to steer military aircraft remotely.’
    • ‘They were arrested when they were trying to steer the ship into a Somali port.’
    • ‘The rationale was that the manual should have pointed out that cruise control does not actually steer a car even if it is maintaining its speed.’
    • ‘This would be analogous to steering an aircraft by fooling an autopilot into responding to a non-existing course deviation.’
    • ‘They probably incapacitated the flight crews, then took over the controls and steered the aircraft into their targets, the experts said.’
    • ‘The boatman steers the boat out into the current where Paul and his fellow co-celebrity, Scotland rugby star Rob Wainwright, make the first casts of the season.’
    • ‘Sailors steer dinghies using a rudder and the crew use their body weight to counterbalance the forces developed by the sail and their common characteristic are lifting centreboards.’
    • ‘The free swiveling nose wheel is steered by differential brakes, rudder and throttles and the aircraft is very maneuverable on the ground.’
    • ‘With the wise guys steering the ship and the youngsters learning from them, we'll be a better industry tomorrow than we were yesterday.’
    • ‘Phaire grabbed the wheel and steered the car and the driver saw where he held it at the top of the wheel.’
    • ‘Without hydraulic subsystems, we slowed and steered the aircraft with differential power, coming to a stop on an off-duty runway.’
    • ‘She said the boat's captain was ill so Ramdhanie, eager to steer the boat, had set sail with a two-man crew.’
    • ‘The port tunnel will steer lorries away from Dublin's quays, drawing people back to the river.’
    • ‘Who but a fool would entrust his life to the hands of such a captain who steers his vessel according to his whims and fancies, and not by the Government chart?’
    • ‘David grabbed hold of the steering wheel, trying to steer the car through the furious traffic on the highway.’
    • ‘During the takeoff run, use pure nosewheel/tailwheel steering until the rudder gathers enough aerodynamic authority.’
    • ‘The rudder is all what you have to steer the airplane.’
    guide, direct, manoeuvre
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[no object] (of a vehicle, vessel, or aircraft) be guided in a specified direction.
      ‘the ship steered into port’
      • ‘After detecting objects using a front-mounted camera, the obstacle's presence is noted by the Linux-based computer, and the bike steers around it.’
      • ‘It was as if both the man and the driver saw each other at the same time. The coach steered over to the left and the front left wheel went up the kerb.’
      • ‘The wind was pushing the car from the left, and each time it dropped I swerved slightly in that direction from steering into the gale in an effort to keep myself on the road.’
      • ‘She steered in the direction of the bar, but I got the feeling she was only under the pretence of buying more drinks.’
      • ‘Thus, to protect himself, he steered and drove in the direction of the police station.’
      • ‘Ritter took the helm and steered the ship into the sea.’
      • ‘The charioteers were crack units of specially-trained frogmen who sat astride a 30 ft-long torpedo which they steered into enemy harbours.’
      • ‘If this is not in the same direction that you had in mind for them, they will often need to be trained onto the support that they have been given and actively steered in the right direction.’
      • ‘The ship steered towards the great lighthouse, around whose base, waves boiled white and broke in showers of foam against treacherous dark rocks.’
      • ‘The police car was trying to get out of the way but Mac steered into it.’
      • ‘I steered into the bike racks, and dismounted from my alloy steed, then rushed back through the opening in the chain link fence.’
      • ‘The light turned into a tunnel, which Patrick steered into.’
      • ‘He steers to the left, accelerates to near bumper-nudging distance, in effort I assume to intimidate the first driver into submission.’
      • ‘He placed his arm around her shoulders and steered in the direction he came from.’
      • ‘The Team quickly steered into formation, making the necessary preparations and performing the jump through lightspace in a matter of moments.’
      • ‘But Ransome was my man - his boy sailors steered their boats as close to the banks as possible and coiled ropes as neatly as interior decorators.’
      • ‘There really isn't any reason for it to have steered in that direction, but they do wobble a little bit.’
      • ‘It has sure-footed, precise handling with a very rigid platform, good steering, a willing engine and a great set of brakes.’
      • ‘She steered into the oncoming lane, and motioned for the Dodge to pull over.’
      • ‘The driver steered into trees and bushes at the side of the road to try to slow the vehicle.’
      • ‘A small vessel was slowly steering towards her, although it looked like it had seen better days.’
    2. 1.2 Follow (a course) in a specified direction.
      ‘the fishermen were steering a direct course for Kodiak’
      • ‘While the nymphs lie low, sucking roots in sheltering soil, you will steer a course from the eager springs of boyhood to the braided delta of manhood and majority.’
      • ‘Chen Yi was not the Great Helmsman but he was there at the helm of the new China, steering its course into the 21st century.’
      • ‘It is the possibility of failure that forces a mass-market broadcasting organization to steer a straight course.’
      • ‘Many policy-makers agonise over this situation; it's very worrisome, because it is so difficult to steer the right course on these very delicate matters.’
      • ‘By holding its finger to the breeze every so often, the party has steered a winding course through the Section 28 debate.’
      • ‘I think the Pope is trying to steer a course in between and trying to be as fair as he can.’
      • ‘He steered a neutral course between the USA and the USSR, which became all the more difficult after the outbreak of the Vietnam War.’
      • ‘They belonged to a generation of hard-working people whose priorities were well focused and who steered a steady course in a world far more at ease with itself than in modern times.’
      • ‘McKay and director David Brown manage to steer a safe course through what is an emotional minefield.’
      • ‘‘To continue to steer a steady course we must hold firm in our demand for discipline in pay setting across the economy,’ added the Chancellor.’
      • ‘Long before she set out for the Ganga, Katrin Simon knew that to steer a course down the great river would be to navigate, not only a geography, but also a mythology.’
      • ‘Whether you are an IT manager or a consultant responsible for advising clients, this book is a must to assist you in steering a clear course through the open source sea.’
      • ‘As should become clear, I steer a course between condemning Forster's nostalgia and embracing it.’
      • ‘Well, you know, I steer a steady course, and I stay that course no matter what the pressure.’
      • ‘Cumbria's most popular tourist attraction has a new man at the helm and is looking to steer a course towards future growth.’
      • ‘A praiseworthy attitude of members of either side that steered the course of the talks smoothly was a ‘share the pain’ component.’
      • ‘Freely, an authority on Ottoman history, steers a clear course through these intricacies.’
      • ‘The East Timorese are steering their own course, but it promises to be a bumpy ride.’
      • ‘However, cox Sean Stephenson steered a good course and prevented them from passing.’
      • ‘In trying to steer a course between education and entertainment, the show ends up becalmed, devoid of the giddy momentum that insight or cheap thrills would provide.’
    3. 1.3 Guide the movement or course of (someone or something)
      ‘he had steered her to a chair’
      figurative ‘he made an attempt to steer the conversation back to Heather’
      • ‘I held back a smile at his obvious attempt to steer me back on course.’
      • ‘Barker was first to react and the striker steered the ball into the net from close range to put the Rams 2-up.’
      • ‘Nawaz, after a streaky boundary to third man off Ganguly, was caught at slip next ball attempting to steer the ball in the same direction.’
      • ‘But, although the striker was in a perfect position to score, a brilliant tackle by Deloumeaux steered the ball off his toe.’
      • ‘I attempted to steer the conversation towards another course.’
      • ‘From the resultant penalty, Wood went for goal, but on this occasion the malevolent wind steered the ball off target.’
      • ‘As it turned out Lowry popped up at the far post to steer the ball home for the lead.’
      • ‘After thirty minutes, she attempted to steer the conversation away from himself before she went insane.’
      • ‘The Reds got off to a good start and took the lead when Jonathan Brennan steered the ball past Niall Fitzpatrick who was having a great game in the Blues goal.’
      • ‘Although he attempted to steer the horses back on course, he could not prevent them from running into the plaintiff and injuring her.’
      • ‘Dennis Bergkamp swings in a free-kick from the left, Gilberto flicks it goalwards and it fizzes narrowly wide. Patrick Vieira lunged in an attempt to steer the ball home, but to no avail.’
      • ‘The pilot attempted to steer the chopper off to the side but he couldn't manage it in time.’
      • ‘He sent in a delicate chip on goal which produced a top class save from the Saints goalkeeper, Roy just managing to get a fingertip to the ball to steer Convery's effort to safety.’
      • ‘The plane dramatically fell from 27,000 ft to 3,000 ft in just eight minutes as the pilot attempted to steer his way into the Roma airport to land.’
      • ‘Finn asked, attempting to steer the conversation onto a different track.’
      • ‘When I finally track down Wah for a brief chat at 8: 30 a.m. at his home office, the elusive poet steers the conversation to others, deflecting the attention.’
      • ‘Nor could it have been good for the ego when Toibin promptly steered the conversation back to Eddie Hobbs.’
      • ‘Jou frequently made attempts to steer the conversation toward Rork, but Valen would not allow it.’
      • ‘Unnoticeably, she steered the conversation far away from the subject.’
      • ‘Lehmann steered a ball from Strong to third man and called for a second run but he had not anticipated Brown hitting the stumps with a fast throw from the boundary edge.’
      guide, conduct, direct, lead, take, usher, escort, shepherd, marshal, herd
      View synonyms

noun

informal
  • A piece of advice or information concerning the development of a situation.

    ‘the need for the school to be given a clear steer as to its future direction’
    • ‘That is what is at the heart of the Lopdell decision and it is the issue that I want to come back to, so that we can have a clear steer on what the options are for dealing with those anomalies.’
    • ‘If the trials had generated a clear steer, one way or the other, there would have been sighs of relief all round.’
    • ‘What is needed is a clear steer from Government of a long-term commitment to such uses.’
    • ‘He said: ‘The inspector's inquiry did not give us a clear steer, one way or the other.’’
    • ‘Despite the inspector's comments on the back of the UDP public inquiry, Asda says the inquiry did not give it a clear steer and it is currently working on revised plans.’
    • ‘The second time, I gave her a clear steer in saying that the audited accounts are a matter of public record.’
    • ‘Despite the Home Office's denials, Mr Brown has previously suggested that the Guardian Group has ‘got a clear steer from somebody on the inside’.’
    • ‘This has been interpreted as a clear steer for councils to consider congestion charging.’
    • ‘The main concern will be the steer on how much energy the firm has managed to contract in advance to power suppliers.’

Phrases

  • steer clear of

    • Take care to avoid or keep away from.

      ‘his program steers clear of prickly local issues’
      • ‘Although he did not yet have a clear plan for his future, John steered clear of the hard-working, hard-drinking lifestyle of many of his fellow building workers.’
      • ‘The report is analytical in the sense of identifying issues, but judicious in seeking balanced comment, and because it is careful to avoid judgments, it steers clear of provocation.’
      • ‘They chose to work with fast-growing retailers who were rethinking how to sell furnishings, and they steered clear of most traditional home stores.’
      • ‘There are areas of every American city that you steer clear of or hurry through because they are more akin to third than first world.’
      • ‘I also steered clear of even talking about the topic of Sherrie's pain.’
      • ‘Bear in mind to take great care to steer clear of the cliffs when skirting the corrie - whichever option is chosen.’
      • ‘Even then, he shunned the limelight, refusing interviews and steering clear of showbiz events.’
      • ‘By causing animals to steer clear of such objects, disgust helps them to avoid being poisoned or infected.’
      • ‘He tries to avoid point accumulation and steers clear of stomping on his opponents, resetting after every botched attempt.’
      • ‘If anyone could give me any recommendations/ones to steer clear of, then let me know.’
      keep away from, keep one's distance from, keep at arm's length, give a wide berth to, avoid, avoid dealing with, have nothing to do with, shun, eschew
      sidestep, evade, dodge, skirt round, circumvent, fight shy of
      duck
      View synonyms
  • steer a middle course

Origin

Old English stīeran, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch sturen and German steuern.

Pronunciation:

steer

/stir/

Main definitions of steer in English

: steer1steer2

steer2

noun

  • A male domestic bovine animal that has been castrated and is raised for beef.

    • ‘Organizers plan to slaughter fed cattle, Holstein steers and cows at the plant and produce specialty beef for Jewish and Muslim markets.’
    • ‘Enhanced immune function was not equivocal in beef feedlot steers.’
    • ‘They raised cackling laying hens and pastured fat, spotted steers.’
    • ‘Beef cattle sold included steers, heifers not kept for replacements, and market bulls and cows.’
    • ‘On the date of harvest, steers were transported to a commercial packing plant 34 km from the experimental feedlot.’
    • ‘Bull calves from dairy herds are usually castrated, becoming steers, and sent to feedlots, where they are fattened for slaughter, usually before the age of 2.’
    • ‘Both heifers and steers showed a significant treatment effect on the severity of abscesses.’
    • ‘In many cases it paid the highest price across the various grades of steers, heifers and cows.’
    • ‘English has cattle, cows, bulls, bullocks, heifers, steers, oxen, and a few more [and spot who has never been good on where ox ends and oxen begin].’
    • ‘Producers in northeastern New Mexico typically purchase steers to graze pasture from different regions of the country.’
    • ‘In the current experiments, no relationship was observed in Angus × Simmental steers and heifers.’
    • ‘Carcass revenue increased for heavier carcasses and steers had a higher value relative to heifers.’
    • ‘Our first assignment was to move a group of steers from one holding pen, down an aisle, into a holding tub, through a curved chute, then weigh them on a scale and move them through a squeeze chute.’
    • ‘Utilization of mature low-quality grass hay by lambs and steers supplemented with soybean meal products’
    • ‘Increased gain from supplementing yearling steers DDGS while grazing summer range did not affect feedlot performance and can be economical.’
    • ‘In April, half the steers were sent to a feedlot in Steele's Tavern, while the rest stayed in West Virginia to graze rotationally.’
    • ‘At the factories, Mr. Bryan said agents were finding it more difficult to get under 30 month steers and beef heifers were also in scarce supply and strong demand.’
    • ‘However, the problems of the steers, heifers and cow trade have been completely ignored and farmers simply are not making money.’
    • ‘Results of preconditioning steers and heifers are similar.’
    • ‘Heifers had more desirable yield and quality grades than steers.’

Origin

Old English stēor, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch stier and German Stier.

Pronunciation:

steer

/stir/