Definition of state in English:

state

noun

  • 1The particular condition that someone or something is in at a specific time.

    ‘the state of the company's finances’
    ‘we're worried about her state of mind’
    • ‘I love colour and use it to represent my state of mind - green is my favourite.’
    • ‘Hopefully, by moving to the north for a little while, my work will improve and so will my state of mind.’
    • ‘I think you've managed to capture my state of mind pretty much exactly.’
    • ‘Last week's ITV documentary raised serious questions about his state of mind.’
    • ‘A positive state of mind is also thought to be of great help in protecting against such problems.’
    • ‘The cowboy is the archetypal American hero, and the western fits America's current state of mind.’
    • ‘At times she is combative, at times submissive, according to the situation and her state of mind.’
    • ‘I have already seen it three times and each time I gain new insights into my own state of mind.’
    • ‘He will under go a psychiatric examination to determine his state of mind at the time of the killings, he said.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, in her state of mind she'd forgotten that she had worn a black jacket that night.’
    • ‘Astaphan said a critical point was the state of mind of the defendant when he made the statements.’
    • ‘Hopefully I'll have surfaced by Sunday afternoon and will be in a fit state to drive over and pick up the family.’
    • ‘They have also begun examining his computer for clues as to his state of mind and any friends who might not have been known to his parents.’
    • ‘Lately, I haven't really been in the right state of mind to make decisions.’
    • ‘Her research suggests that a little after-work light could lead to being in a better state of mind.’
    • ‘And final confirmation of my poor state of mind from lack of sleep came when Mark returned from going out.’
    • ‘I needed to hear words that only he could say, words that would shake me out of my unsettled state of mind.’
    • ‘There is a parallel between his state of mind in the late 1960s and when he wrote the book in the early 1940s.’
    • ‘His state of mind becomes even more troubled when a copy of Rebecca's childhood diary arrives anonymously in the post.’
    • ‘After that initial catharsis had passed she asked me to fill in some questionnaires so that she could establish my state of mind.’
    condition, shape, situation, circumstances, state of affairs, position
    mood, humour, temper, disposition, spirits, morale, state of mind, emotional state, frame of mind, attitude
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A physical condition as regards internal or molecular form or structure.
      ‘water in a liquid state’
      • ‘It can only obtain a liquid state under very high pressure in a containment vessel.’
      • ‘All matter generally exists in one of three physical phase states commonly described as solid, liquid, or gas.’
      • ‘The hydrogen atom was stable because the possible energy states of the electron in the atom are quantized by the rule.’
      • ‘Nuclear isomers are excited states that eventually decay to the ground state, mostly by gamma radiation.’
      • ‘Water-soluble polymers are widely used to probe ion channel structures in their functional states.’
      • ‘A small electrical pulse however, will turn this state into an ordered states with the atoms lined up in a crystalline structure.’
      • ‘When the electrons return to a relaxed state, they emit photons and produce light.’
      • ‘In quantum mechanics we see many physical systems as have two states.’
      • ‘Water is the only common substance that occurs naturally on earth in three different physical states.’
      • ‘According to quantum theory, the state of a particle is described as its wave function.’
      • ‘Electrical conductivity in the liquid state is generally due to the presence of ions.’
      • ‘But many atoms and essentially all molecules possess many low-energy states.’
      • ‘It may absorb radiation and change its internal energy states.’
      • ‘In contrast to the glasses and networks, these are relatively low viscosity liquid states.’
      • ‘The exclusion principle would then block the possibility of any transitions to them from the positive energy states.’
      • ‘Hydrogen Guy can influence hydrogen atoms around him, and change their chemical or physical states.’
      • ‘The important physical quantity is the difference in energy between any two states of a system.’
    2. 1.2a stateinformal [in singular] An agitated or anxious condition.
      ‘don't get into a state’
      • ‘The woman called the emergency services saying he was in a depressed and anxious state.’
      • ‘With the hotel guests in a state of panic it was left to the hotel staff to organise things.’
      • ‘He woke in a state of panic and was unable to sleep afterwards.’
      • ‘Mrs Jones described the defendant as being in a state of ‘panic’ when they returned.’
      • ‘I was still in an agitated state, so I spent the first few songs flapping about.’
      • ‘Smith was in such a state of shock and panic he even left his daughter at the scene.’
      • ‘A member of the public who was in the office fled as the man, who is said to have been in a highly agitated state, walked in.’
      • ‘I shouted in a state of panic as my time left to get ready dwindled down to only 13 minutes.’
      • ‘She phones de Caunes towards the end of the interview in something of an agitated state.’
      • ‘While there was a state of panic in the room, a few of us decided to call for the nurse.’
      • ‘He left the room, leaving the four of us in a state of anxiety.’
      • ‘He became fearful and went back into the bedroom in a state of agitation, his heart beating loudly.’
      • ‘If we approached him, he would yell loud and incoherently in a state of extreme panic.’
      • ‘He said Miss Hegarty, who is in her late 20s, was in the road near the crashed car in an agitated state.’
      • ‘One day one of his students came to see him in a state of some agitation.’
      • ‘Eric is hopping about in a state of excited agitation.’
      • ‘As soon it did so, the man inside started to move frantically, as if in a state of panic.’
      • ‘I didn't go, but Jane, Richard and David reported that the meeting began with everyone in a state of high anxiety.’
      • ‘In normal circumstances I would have been happy, but I couldn't go through that again, I was in a state of panic.’
      • ‘On day one of the school year, I sat there in a state of panic and they babbled on to the teacher with rapid accuracy.’
      fluster, flutter, frenzy, fever, fret, panic, state of agitation, state of anxiety, nervous state, distressed state
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3informal [in singular] A dirty or untidy condition.
      ‘look at the state of you—what a mess!’
      • ‘The couple have paid the charges since they bought the flat but have been complaining to the council about the state of the communal area.’
      • ‘Sometimes the pool areas and the cubicles were in a disgustingly dirty state.’
      • ‘And in small towns and rural areas, the state of the toilets can hit one like a ton of bricks.’
      • ‘I refer to the shameful state of the area behind Superdrug highlighted in your article on March 26.’
      • ‘But now parish councillors have heard that he has written to complain about the state of the area's toilets.’
      • ‘If they are then this country is in an even sorrier state than I imagined it to be.’
      • ‘They must leave with a terrible impression after seeing the state of our streets.’
      untidiness, mess, untidy state, chaos, disorder, disarray, disorganization, confusion, clutter, muddle, heap, shambles, tangle, mishmash
      View synonyms
    4. 1.4Physics
      short for quantum state
      • ‘States obtained in this way are called mixed states, as opposed to pure states, which cannot be described as a mixture of others.’
      • ‘An arbitrary evolution of its quantum state can be programmed with a series of microwave pulses, and a projective measurement of the state can be performed by a pulsed readout subcircuit.’
  • 2A nation or territory considered as an organized political community under one government.

    ‘Germany, Italy, and other European states’
    • ‘That runs counter to the political morality of many states and regimes.’
    • ‘Indonesia is an important Islamic country but it is not a formal Islamic state.’
    • ‘On Tuesday Fred and Charmaigne travel to Zanzibar, an island state within the United Republic of Tanzania.’
    • ‘Zambia has never involved itself in internal political matters of other states, regionally or overseas.’
    • ‘Where there is no higher authority, as in a world composed only of nation states, the state has to be judge and jury in its own cause.’
    • ‘It will renew, transform and open up the nations and states of Europe to the global era.’
    • ‘The other side is a failed third world state with a level of development among the lowest in the world.’
    • ‘Other recent arrivals at the Biennale include former Soviet states and nations: Belarus, Estonia, Latvia and the Ukraine.’
    • ‘More than 80 percent of this trade is with other member states of the European Community.’
    • ‘The forces around Attac yearn for a return to a period when national capitalist states exercised broad control over the economy and society.’
    • ‘And these organizations' member states are also behaving more independently.’
    • ‘This time democratic rather than autocratic states are determining the shape of the new world.’
    • ‘One of these was that religious dissension or aristocratic ambition could plunge a modern state into civil war.’
    • ‘Advanced technology has limited the independence of all nations and states.’
    • ‘And if there are states and regimes, nations, that support terrorism, we hope to persuade them that it is in their interest to stop doing that.’
    • ‘In other words, Europe has been weak wherever individual countries acted as national states.’
    • ‘Bennett is a political adversary, but he is also a fellow citizen of a democratic state.’
    • ‘The accession states are ancient nations with huge cultural and political legacies.’
    • ‘We need a strong partnership with the Commonwealth and all other states and territories.’
    • ‘Empires generally expect neighboring states and dependencies to accept their power and accommodate to it.’
    country, nation, land, sovereign state, nation state, kingdom, empire, republic, confederation, federation, body politic, commonwealth, power, world power, superpower, polity, domain, territory
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 An organized political community or area forming part of a federal republic.
      ‘the German state of Bavaria’
      • ‘President Bush declared major disasters in North Carolina and Virginia, ordering federal aid to both states.’
      • ‘We are providing assistance to different relief camps in Ahmadabad and other areas of the state.’
      • ‘Maryland has a reputation as being one of the most politically liberal states in the nation.’
      • ‘Most of the 50 states have areas that might be suitable for wind power.’
      • ‘Your vote is still counted and since we have an electorial college it allows for people in smaller states and from rural areas to have a vote as well.’
      • ‘Altogether, its total area is slightly less than the combined areas of the states of Utah and Nevada.’
      • ‘The reclamation of the old city neighbourhoods in the new, Eastern states of the German Federal Republic was a success story.’
      • ‘While there is no guarantee the electoral college will choose the winner of the popular vote, it maintains the concept of America as a federal union of diverse states.’
      • ‘Governor Jeb Bush declared the state a disaster area on Wednesday to speed aid after the storm hits.’
      • ‘There is no attempt being made to tamper with the federal character of our states.’
      • ‘In north Borneo, indigenous groups in the interior areas of the eastern states of Sabah and Sarawak are among the worst affected.’
      • ‘Mexico is a federal republic, consisting of thirty one states and one federal district.’
      • ‘As you know, she and the president have been making their rounds throughout the various states and the areas that were hardest hit.’
      • ‘Food, water, generators, tarpaulins, and fuel are already being rushed to the areas from other states.’
      • ‘The setting for this study was an elementary school in an urban area of a southeastern state.’
      • ‘The rest are from other states and from different areas of Texas.’
      • ‘The undisputed best ride in the Miami area and possibly the state is Oleta River.’
      • ‘Explore wild Utah backcountry on the edge of the largest roadless area in the state.’
      • ‘The two states were comparable in size and were the most powerful states in the area.’
      • ‘Congressional districts, states and counties should develop programs with Federal support.’
      province, federal state, region, territory, canton, department, county, area, district, sector, zone
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2
      informal term for United States
      • ‘But we assume that the children will make their lives in America, so I foresee us having a home in the east coast of the States, and dividing our time between here and there, so as to be near the children.’
      • ‘I see it as a big problem here in the States.’
      • ‘My people came from Bucks, England, and emigrated to the States in the early fifties.’
      • ‘Officers, on the other hand, were sometimes allowed to bring their wives and children from the States, at their own expense.’
      • ‘News has reached the district of the death in the States of Lil O'Connor.’
      • ‘Juan Pablo helped him escape to the States and was unaware of his whereabouts until he saw the Fusion commercial on the telly.’
      • ‘She knows people at an extremely high level in Europe, the States, the Middle East, Asia, Africa, China and Russia.’
      • ‘Neither do police know if all the pot was grown in Richmond or just deposited here before transport to the States.’
  • 3The civil government of a country.

    ‘services provided by the state’
    [in combination] ‘state-run agency’
    ‘King Fahd appointed a council to advise him on affairs of state’
    • ‘The separation of church and state at an institutional level remains a core value in this country.’
    • ‘The centralizing tendencies of the state, however, are ominously freed to do their worst.’
    • ‘Thereafter, in bad health, he took little part in military or civil affairs of state.’
    • ‘Now, the attack on executives is at the forefront of the state's intrusion on civil liberties.’
    • ‘Therefore reformists deduce that no direct challenge to the state is necessary and civil society can be reformed.’
    • ‘To drive his point home, Marx makes use of a distinction between the state and civil society.’
    • ‘It is not just the politicians who are calling for even more expansion of the state in this area.’
    • ‘In effect, if you are found to have access to the Internet but instead use the post to deal with the state, then state penalties will apply.’
    • ‘The United Kingdom is unusual in the extent to which the state employs hospital consultants in state owned hospitals.’
    • ‘Now we have reached a stage where the state shows its inability in controlling rampant crime.’
    • ‘The doctrine of reason of state allows for the penetration of civil society by the state.’
    • ‘It is at times the rudder that steadies and guides the ship of state captained by the Government.’
    • ‘His reign marked a significant advance from personal monarchy towards the bureaucratised state of the future.’
    government, parliament, the administration, the regime, the authorities, the council, the establishment
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1 The legislative body in Jersey, Guernsey, and Alderney.
  • 4Pomp and ceremony associated with monarchy or high levels of government.

    ‘he was buried in state’
    • ‘The sailors lay him in state on the dock at Odessa, and the workers file out in their hundreds to pay their respects.’
    • ‘Edward was seated in state with the Duke of Gloucester at his side.’
    • ‘The Queen processed in state to the Houses of Parliament in a glittering coach, flanked by ranks of household cavalry.’
    • ‘Lord Percy returned several days later to find his wife laid in state and his son grievously ill.’
    • ‘He will lie here in state until early on Friday morning for the public to pay their last respects.’
    • ‘It was on the stool that a deceased person was bathed before being laid in state.’
    • ‘The process has to be repeated several times during the laying in state.’
    • ‘The existing maces have far more in common with the same item that Kings of the period are shown holding when crowned or seated in state.’
    • ‘In the corridor beyond, he looked up to where he knew her to be lying, as if in state.’
    • ‘The bodies in the cathedral were already being gathered by monks and laid out in state at one end of the nave.’
    • ‘Behind him came a second car with Rufus, his poodle, sitting in state beside the chauffeur.’
    • ‘Imagine if she threw open the doors to her hospital room - the queue would be akin to the one waiting to see the Pope in state.’
  • 5[usually with modifier] An impression taken from an etched or engraved plate at a particular stage.

    • ‘Mrs. Siddons was a first state with the coveted blotted edge.’
    1. 5.1 A particular printed version of the first edition of a book, distinguished from others by prepublication changes.
      • ‘Every image in this folio is printed in two states, one in full color and one in black ink on golden ochre-colored paper.’
      • ‘He frequently made numerous changes as he progressed, preserved in the succeeding states of the print.’

adjective

  • 1Of, provided by, or concerned with the civil government of a country.

    ‘the future of state education’
    ‘a state secret’
    • ‘However, I take issue with those who think more state intervention will help.’
    • ‘On the Indian side, again, this would be counter-guaranteed by more state funds.’
    • ‘He argues for more state funding of religious institutions within an increasingly secular society.’
    • ‘Why bother to go to the trouble of tagging these people and paying them state benefits to which they have no right?’
    • ‘In one New Jersey district, the courts have opened the door to more state funding.’
    • ‘If that happens in any major way, then state employees should not expect to see their pension arrangements safeguarded.’
    • ‘They envisaged a world free of churches, especially state churches like the Church of England.’
    • ‘The solution is to create no more state religious schools at all.’
    • ‘Secondary school teachers demonstrated to demand salary increases and more state funding.’
    • ‘Born and educated in Melbourne, he joined the state civil service of Victoria in 1913.’
    • ‘Taxpayer money and state television was used to benefit a few parties, monitors said in their criticism.’
    • ‘He has called for more state control over the national oil reserves.’
    • ‘Who really wants their name associated with increasing the state retirement age or compelling people to save more?’
    • ‘They have this system of state subsidies for the music industry.’
    • ‘It was to be voluntary, and would prove entitlement to healthcare and other state services.’
    • ‘That means much more diverse provision and much less state control.’
    • ‘Occasionally, private or state funding is found to send them to foreign capitals to perform.’
    • ‘Farming gets more state aid than the rest of industry combined.’
    • ‘What we don't love is how state censorship denies our rights and threatens our queer culture.’
    • ‘She wants tax breaks for childcare and more state nursery provision.’
  • 2Used or done on ceremonial occasions; involving the ceremony associated with a head of state.

    ‘a state visit to Hungary by Queen Elizabeth’
    • ‘He added that a state ceremony would be ‘appropriate’ recognition of her stature.’
    • ‘And since that time they have been brought forth only occasionally for royal and state occasions.’
    • ‘There was an element of panic amongst those more used to solemn and largely artificial state ceremonies.’
    • ‘His death was marked by a ceremonial state funeral: no French scientist had ever been so honoured.’
    • ‘It is now clear that this may well be a blueprint for all future state occasions and festivities in this age of terrorism.’
    • ‘The point of such a state occasion is, in the most exact sense, propagandistic.’
    • ‘Worn on a hot evening at a state occasion, such dresses must have been uncomfortable to wear.’
    • ‘They have royal ceremonies and entertain foreign leaders at glittering state banquets.’
    • ‘It has emerged that the wedding will not be a grand state occasion and will mainly be attended by family and friends.’
    • ‘It may have been the last - if not the only - time the Queen carried a frilly parasol on a state occasion.’
    • ‘For the object of their attention at Beningbrough Hall is described as one of the finest Baroque state beds to survive in England.’
    • ‘J.R. bought me a couple of embroidered table cloths because they were so beautiful and I still use them on state occasions.’
    • ‘The unisonant moment may occur when a national anthem is being sung at a state ceremony.’
    • ‘This was once a state bedroom for visiting dignitaries but is now an elegant drawing room for entertaining important guests.’
    ceremonial, official, formal, governmental, national, public
    View synonyms

verb

  • 1[reporting verb] Express something definitely or clearly in speech or writing.

    [with clause] ‘the report stated that more than 51 percent of voters failed to participate’
    [with direct speech] ‘“Money hasn't changed me,” she stated firmly’
    [with object] ‘people will be invited to state their views’
    • ‘Most plants sold through garden centres have their heat factor stated clearly on the label.’
    • ‘The company's website stated very clearly that they had not been rented to schools.’
    • ‘I also clearly stated that if Arriva Trains wins the new Northern rail franchise, its head office would be in York.’
    • ‘We've stated very clearly that Lloyd's can manage its losses from September 11.’
    • ‘As the newspaper's report clearly stated, the activity has been taking place since February this year.’
    • ‘The passage clearly states he should be put to death.’
    • ‘This has the great virtue of being very clearly stated and therefore very easy to refute.’
    • ‘Our member of Parliament clearly stated that he believed in the rehabilitation of offenders.’
    • ‘As the interim report stated more clearly, education and communication have a poor record.’
    • ‘He clearly states he does not have that power and he's not going to do it.’
    • ‘However, this option is, as he states, clearly on the table and will be discussed in April.’
    • ‘I assume when he joined he read our policy statement which clearly states our aims and objectives.’
    • ‘He stated very clearly in it that in order to study and practice homoeopathy, one must be a medical doctor first.’
    • ‘It clearly stated at the office that you need both proof of address and a valid item of identification.’
    • ‘The Corps has clearly stated that they do not think the lack of funding was the problem.’
    • ‘The report clearly stated that the quality of the clergy had to be improved.’
    • ‘Their advertisements clearly stated that free car parking would be available.’
    • ‘He states clearly that his work is not aimed at mathematicians, rather at statesmen who need to know about the customs of the people and the natural resources of the land.’
    • ‘It states clearly that the aim of cannabis legislation should be to focus on preventing under-age use.’
    • ‘The lessons learned in the Bristol inquiry were clearly stated in the report.’
    express, voice, utter, say, tell, declare, affirm, assert, aver, announce, make known, communicate, reveal, disclose, divulge, give out, give voice to, pronounce, articulate, enunciate, proclaim, present, expound, preach, promulgate, publish, broadcast
    set out, set down, frame, formulate, spell out, be specific about
    come out with
    asseverate
    set, fixed, settled, agreed, declared, determined, approved, authorized, accredited, ruled, ordained, designated, laid down
    claimed, official, supposed, professed, alleged
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Law [with object] Specify the facts of (a case) for consideration.
      ‘judges must give both sides an equal opportunity to state their case’
      • ‘In any event, the matters can be litigated in the ordinary course rather than by stating a case.’
      • ‘Before I stated the case I would need to know in some final form what the Full Court was being visited with.’
      • ‘It is not your doing, I understand, although you concurred in stating the case.’
      • ‘The Council requested the justices to state a case for the opinion of the High Court.’
      • ‘Then I will indicate that I will state a case substantially in the form submitted to me.’
      • ‘When you are sure of your facts, you can state your case with force and authority.’
      • ‘I am not sure whether a trial judge could state a case arising from an application to quash.’
      • ‘The applicant now applies with leave for judicial review of the Justices' refusal to state a case’
      • ‘The fact is I have stated a case, and unless someone seeks to dissolve it, perhaps you should get on with it.’
      • ‘I am reluctant to state a case when the substratum was not the right substratum.’
      • ‘From this draft I accepted Item 4 as being a point of law for which the justices would be asked to state a case.’
      • ‘You may be right but that is the question to be decided and that is what we have stated the case about.’
      • ‘In any event, the judge was also entitled to refuse to state a case because of your delay.’
      • ‘Then we have the stated case, if you give permission, and that, my Lords, would state the case.’
      • ‘Subsequently the Crown Court stated a Case - there is now an appeal by way of Case Stated against the ruling.’
      • ‘Secondly, he should be given an opportunity to state his case, and finally the internal tribunal should act in good faith.’
      • ‘The main purpose of stating the case is this, that your Honour has indicated that a case will be stated in the next few days in the matter of Shaw.’
      • ‘The magistrates, as requested, have stated a case for the purposes of this appeal.’
      • ‘They were all there was; outside the writs, there was no common law, no way to state a case or get before a judge.’
      • ‘If that can be got in order, I will make that necessary order for stating the case.’
  • 2Music
    [with object] Present or introduce (a theme or melody) in a composition.

    • ‘By simply stating his melodies, Dobbyn has never sung so plainly or powerfully.’
    • ‘Elgar rarely states the motto in full, and yet its presence haunts the entire work.’
    • ‘It begins with the bass stating the melody and features a shifting arrangement that allows everyone a chance to solo.’
    • ‘Each of its four movements really just states a group of ideas - exposition without development.’

Phrases

  • state of affairs (or things)

    • A situation or set of circumstances.

      ‘the survey revealed a sorry state of affairs in schools’
      • ‘I don't want to travel by public transport as I don't feel safe, and that is a sorry state of affairs.’
      • ‘‘I think it's pretty meaningless to make a film that reinforces the current state of things,’ says Achbar.’
      • ‘I like the idea of teaching kids to evaluate risks, but I wonder about the state of things in our world today.’
      • ‘I genuinely take the view when I travel that most people are basically decent and friendly and amazingly hospitable, and that's the natural state of things.’
      • ‘‘When he arrives, we will sit down and have a long talk regarding his position and the state of things in the team,’ he said.’
      • ‘A sorry state of affairs to say the least and a disaster for the promotion of the game.’
      • ‘It isn't really about revealing, you know, the true state of things, it is partly about selling us things that keep us comfortably numb in the matrix.’
      • ‘Whether that will really work with voters, who tend to be pretty happy with the state of things right now, remains to be seen.’
      • ‘Sunderland's solicitor Clive Flynn described the case as a sad and sorry state of affairs.’
      • ‘The pains of exile, as it turns out, extend outward into a pained contemplation of the sorry state of things worldwide.’
      condition, shape, situation, circumstances, state of affairs, position
      View synonyms
  • state of the art

    • 1The most recent stage in the development of a product, incorporating the newest ideas and the most up-to-date features.

      • ‘The state of the art in factoring has advanced tremendously in the last 30 years.’
      • ‘If you guys wanna see the state of the art right now in the Montreal music scene: Natalie Portman.’
      • ‘In the 1950's C. Miller Fisher.. proposed that anastomosis, or joining, of cerebral arteries beyond the point of occlusion might be appropriate in some stroke cases, but such manipulations were then still beyond the state of the art.’
      • ‘From this point of view, the use of simplified model systems is an unavoidable stage within the present state of the art.’
      1. 1.1Incorporating the newest ideas and the most up-to-date features.
        ‘a new state-of-the-art hospital’
        • ‘It is not state of the art - Class 47s have long been superseded by HSTs, tilting trains and TGVs.’
        • ‘Cheap to produce, these simple gadgets and engineering projects - many devised by the locals - may not be state of the art.’
        • ‘This production method was state of the art back in 1966, and still is very difficult to master today.’
        • ‘A new £1.6m state-of-the art visitor centre has opened its doors at Dawyck Botanic Garden (Scotland), one of four botanic gardens of the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh.’
        • ‘The state-of-the-art vehicles are part of a fleet of almost 200 tough, all-terrain cargo vehicles destined for 3 Commando Brigade.’
        • ‘But the facilities were state of the art, and soon Sister Ellen and her colleagues were helping a new generation into the world.’
        • ‘All four of Pixar's films have been critical favourites, and have been absolutely state of the art in terms of animation.’
        • ‘He said the new kitchen is much more modern and state of the art, and will be much more efficient for workers and kitchen personnel.’
        • ‘Remarkable for the time, the production process in the new distillery was state of the art in terms of continuous distillation.’
        • ‘‘We consider it's real state of the art,’ says the project director, Peter Lundhus.’
        modern, ultra-modern, futuristic, avant-garde, the latest, new, the newest, up to the minute
        advanced, highly developed, innovatory, trailblazing, revolutionary
        sophisticated, complex, complicated, elaborate, intricate, subtle, delicate
        gimmicky
        View synonyms
  • state of emergency

    • A situation of national danger or disaster in which a government suspends normal constitutional procedures in order to regain control.

      ‘the government has declared a state of emergency’
      • ‘It was only a matter of time before they called for a national state of emergency to be imposed and the troops to be sent in to the countryside.’
      • ‘El Salvador President Francisco Flores declared a national state of emergency.’
      • ‘Algeria has been in a declared state of emergency since 1992, therefore the wartime scales are liable to apply.’
      • ‘Mr Neptune declared a national state of emergency on Wednesday in part because of the continuing clashes.’
      • ‘Chavez said he would only consider declaring a state of emergency if the situation required such a measure.’
      • ‘It gave support to the government's initial state of emergency, declared for a twelve-day period.’
      • ‘The president could also declare a state of emergency and rule by emergency decree.’
      • ‘Currently, the country is under a national state of emergency.’
      • ‘In a nationwide state of emergency, the security police seemed to be everywhere.’
      • ‘By February 8 the situation had escalated further with the declaration of a state of emergency.’
  • state of grace

    • A condition of being free from sin.

      • ‘But in the next breath, we also know that the beauty within us shines a lot more brightly and gives God more pleasure when we are connected to Jesus and in a state of grace.’
      • ‘And you have to be in a state of grace to receive communion.’
      • ‘One in a state of grace is a master of demons, as divine energy flows freely from above overcoming all.’
      • ‘In his case, that involves fasting, to reach a state spiritual attunement, and then a confession of his sins so as to be ‘in a state of grace with God.’’
      • ‘And when the archdeacon dies, he does so in a state of grace.’
      • ‘St. Thomas Aquinas taught that a person who is in a state of grace is open to the virtues and gifts that God has poured out.’
      • ‘The word ‘disgrace’ may hint at the state of grace that can be achieved only by compassion for other living beings.’
      • ‘Thus there is the same relation between Christ's deeds for himself and his members, as there is between what another man does in the state of grace and himself.’
      • ‘The one baptized is in a state of grace and must assent to, and cooperate with, this infusion in order to become inherently righteous.’
      • ‘The idea of ‘consulting’ Catholics not in a state of grace would have struck Newman as grotesquely beyond the pale.’
  • state of life

    • (in religious contexts) a person's occupation, calling, or status.

      • ‘Those that bear the nature of the flesh are in a state of death, while those that bear the nature of the Spirit are in a state of life.’
      • ‘As Catholics, we finally believe that our story is part of God's story, and therefore reject the notion that any human form or state of life is useless.’
      • ‘Others, particularly in the modern period, have envisioned their heavenly reward as a state of life after death in heaven with God.’
  • state of war

    • A situation when war has been declared or is in progress.

      • ‘Then the Alien Enemies Act gave the president the authority to confine or deport aliens of an enemy country during a state of war.’
      • ‘The US executive has, in effect, declared a permanent state of war.’
      • ‘He invokes Hobbes in explaining we are in a state of war.’
      • ‘And should the talkers determine not to be derailed, they'll find themselves still in a state of war at the end of their peace talks.’
      • ‘America is, after all, as President Bush said immediately after 11 September, in a state of war.’
      • ‘Such attacks are supported by the international community as the defense of a sovereign nation in a state of war.’
      • ‘The United States was plunged into a state of war yesterday by an enemy it could not see.’
      • ‘We are in a state of war… there will be a prolonged effort by our government to make sure that these attacks cannot continue.’
      • ‘The way to protect innocent enemy soldiers, as David suggests, is by no longer being in a state of war - which may demand winning the war.’
      • ‘Torture is a crime under international law and cannot be justified under any circumstance such as a state of war or any other public emergency.’

Origin

Middle English (as a noun): partly a shortening of estate, partly from Latin status manner of standing, condition (see status). The current verb senses date from the mid 17th century.

Pronunciation:

state

/stāt/