Definition of stammer in English:

stammer

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1Speak with sudden involuntary pauses and a tendency to repeat the initial letters of words.

    • ‘‘Good boy,’ he finally grunted when he was sure he could speak without stammering.’
    • ‘He stammered, he stuttered, he stopped to look over notes and he forgot what he was saying plenty of times.’
    • ‘We are suddenly, when we stammer and pause, in a position to gauge the difference language makes, the revelation that if we cannot name something there is a real sense in which we do not have it.’
    • ‘Every time he looked at her, he felt like a small boy, stammering over his words, or saying something absolutely inane.’
    • ‘‘N-n-n-no problem,’ replied Chastity, stammering at his sudden courage.’
    • ‘It was a known secret that when Helen lied she had a tendency to stammer.’
    • ‘Frequent headaches may be independent, but because they make you tense, and you have a tendency to stammer, you probably do so during a headache.’
    • ‘Da Vinci is almost the only TV program I can think of where people speak as they do in real life: they stammer, trail off, repeat themselves, go on unrelated tangents, and loop back into continuing conversations.’
    • ‘And there I had been, stammering and stuttering until I found my voice, until I finally showed her that I had a little bit of something in me - words that could be angry, something other than timidity or shyness.’
    • ‘It took him a while to realize who she was and he immediately obeyed, stammering and stuttering with his words as he complied.’
    • ‘She'll start acting coy, and then suddenly blink, stammer, turn red, and hurry off quickly or, if we're in our room (this semester we have a free period at the same time), she buries her nose in a book.’
    • ‘Carl observed that when Preston spoke these words he did not stammer once over the names themselves.’
    • ‘He stammered, a tomato red blush creeping up his neck.’
    • ‘Every thought and lesson flew right out of her head, leaving her stuttering and stammering over things even the younger grades already knew.’
    • ‘The man stammered over his words for a moment before he finally managed to regain the power of speech.’
    • ‘The rain turned from warm and pleasurable to cold and assaulting, and my teeth chattered, my words stammered, because of it.’
    • ‘Here I am, a distinguished public speaker, stuttering and stammering, at a complete loss for words.’
    • ‘Michael O'Shea, who is over the McGuire Programme's Waterford support group, said the programme provided help and support to people with this speech problem by teaching them a technique that enables them to speak without stammering.’
    • ‘Stuttering (or stammering, as it is often called in Britain) is probably the best known and most researched speech disorder, but perhaps the most difficult to define, to explain, and to treat, especially in adults.’
    • ‘He had a tendency to stammer when he was nervous, which he always seemed to be when he was summoned by Mordred.’
    stutter, speak haltingly, stumble over one's words, hesitate, falter, fumble for words, pause, halt, mumble, splutter
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1reporting verb Utter (words) with a stammer.
      with direct speech ‘“I … I can't,” Isabel stammered’
      ‘I stammered out my history’
      • ‘Roxanne accepted the gifts, stammering her thanks.’
      • ‘I stopped him before he got into a bus, stammered some words of praise for his honesty, and wished him well for the elections.’
      • ‘Yasir was nervous, and started stammering his words.’
      • ‘Crisp rose awkwardly, stammering a greeting and almost chewed off his tongue before falling silent and blushing, his pale features flushed, marred only by the slight bruising from where he had been struck by the man in the city.’
      • ‘‘Yes we met at the Farquar ball a couple of months before,’ Bertie said shocked that he did not stammer one word in that sentence.’
      • ‘A few of us passed Harold, patted him on the back and stammered ill-fitting words of sympathy.’
      • ‘She and I couldn't help stammering our gratitude to Jeffrey.’
      • ‘Rogozhin proposes that they give each other the crosses they wear round their necks, and stammers a renunciation of Nastasia.’
      • ‘No strings, they'd assured me as I stammered my thanks.’
      • ‘Mike hadn't said a word as he stammered a list of worries, concerns and fears - but he had listened.’
      • ‘He stammers excuses, she is in the background yelling and he is calling her names.’
      • ‘Both of us blushed deep colors and stammered apologies.’
      • ‘Fearful, perplexed, he stammers incomprehensible excuses under the suspicious stare of the policeman, who does not believe that someone would refuse to accept that kind of change.’
      • ‘He stammered a few syllables and shifted his feet.’
      • ‘Gibil stepped back as he stammered his challenge.’
      • ‘When I started stammering something about plans I already had, Claire squashed all my hopes for getting out of it.’
      • ‘He clutched my upper sleeve tightly and writhed in his agony for a while before finally stammering a few words.’
      • ‘I flashed my badge at him and he stammered an apology, saying he would take me as far as the edge of the town I needed to get to.’
      • ‘Suddenly sorry for lashing out, she stammered an apology.’
      • ‘Brae followed cautiously, and Chase stood behind him stammering his misgivings.’

noun

  • A tendency to stammer.

    ‘as a young man, he had a dreadful stammer’
    • ‘Sitting towards the back of the hall was an inconspicuous, balding, bespectacled man with a slight stammer.’
    • ‘He would often practise his speeches for many hours and had a slight stammer and lisp.’
    • ‘Hard to believe, but the effort in Bird's voice stems from a childhood stammer.’
    • ‘John's constant unsuccessful attempts to gain his father's attention and approval, coupled with being forced to write with his right hand, are the reasons he gives for his developing a stammer and his subsequent lack of self-esteem.’
    • ‘My stammer would make me completely unable to say a sentence properly, but I didn't want this ever to get in the way of what I wanted to do.’
    • ‘She sensed the stammer in my voice and hugged me tightly.’
    • ‘Birkin, a Londoner who has survived the Great War but is left with a stammer, a nervous twitch, and vivid nightmares, is given the summer job of uncovering a mediaeval wall-painting in the church of a small Yorkshire village.’
    • ‘Jas Duke was the artist who turned the infliction of a stammer into some of the greatest performance poetry ever.’
    • ‘They highlighted the fact that many famous people with a stammer, including Winston Churchill and Marilyn Monroe, managed to overcome their speech defect.’
    • ‘By the way - who, today, would hire a lecturer with a stammer?’
    • ‘We, a young couple, novices in bringing up children, had gifted a stammer to our eldest-born.’
    • ‘Carter first learned to trade with his fists when he was a 10-year-old who suffered from a severe stammer and refused to be ridiculed.’
    • ‘Karim, whose excellent English labours under a debilitating stammer, says: ‘My neighbours are very good people.’’
    • ‘‘H-hello,’ she stammered, slipping back briefly into a childhood stammer.’
    • ‘The young schoolgirl with the stammer in Switzerland has become a very poised public speaker in Pattaya.’
    • ‘The courses were held in the town for four days, and Gareth, pictured right, who conquered a severe stammer and recently became a speech therapist, gave his first lessons teaching some of the 100 students who attended the course.’
    • ‘‘I didn't think there was much good fiction that takes you inside what it's like to have a stammer,’ he says.’
    • ‘‘When I was in my teens, I had a terrible stammer,’ he says.’
    • ‘It could be construed as a brave choice because - though you'd never know it from watching him in character - Dimsdale has a noticeable stammer, something that could be seen as a big drawback in a profession where the voice is paramount.’
    • ‘There might be a slight stammer but otherwise the speech will seem normal.’
    stutter, speech impediment, speech defect
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Old English stamerian, of West Germanic origin; related to stumble. The noun dates from the late 18th century.

Pronunciation

stammer

/ˈstæmər//ˈstamər/