Definition of squiredom in US English:

squiredom

noun

  • See squire

    • ‘Much of Gaius's squiredom was spent fetching and carrying for the knight, lugging spare weapons and armour around while his master dispensed advice, ostensibly teaching the youth the virtues of humility and laboriousness.’
    • ‘Wealthy and more or less contented, O'Hara settled into a life of uxorious country squiredom, first in Quogue, on Long Island, and then in Princeton.’
    • ‘The whole place seemed a maze to me, and I could not imagine how Liam navigated them, even though he had lived here from birth, with the exception of the time that he served his squiredom.’
    • ‘The end of the period of squiredom is often celebrated with a feast organized by the family of the squire or by the Tutor Knight himself.’
    • ‘The faithful squire, who dubs Don Quixote the Knight of the Sorrowful Face, is a poor, uneducated farmer who's lured into squiredom by the idea that he will, by following his Master, one day become Governor of his very own island.’

Pronunciation

squiredom

/-dəm/