Definition of space in English:

space

noun

  • 1A continuous area or expanse which is free, available, or unoccupied.

    ‘a table took up much of the space’
    ‘we shall all be living together in a small space’
    ‘he backed out of the parking space’
    ‘the space between a wall and a utility pipe’
    • ‘Allocating wardrobes to another area frees up more space in the bedroom itself, so there is room for larger beds.’
    • ‘Tents and holiday homes stand on their own grassy plots, spread around a large area, and each has space to park a car in front.’
    • ‘The scheme will include a widening of Cemetery Road, new signage and additional car parking space.’
    • ‘It is hoped that this will ease congestion in the town and free up some parking space.’
    • ‘This door opens to a great expanse of space where the family room is.’
    • ‘The site is currently a public car park with space for about 40 cars.’
    • ‘Its aim is to increase patient satisfaction by reducing the length of stay in hospital and to free bed space for other patients.’
    • ‘Entry on the day is free but space will be limited, so arrive early to avoid disappointment.’
    • ‘The space freed up by relocating and improving the fracture clinic will be used to enlarge the area.’
    • ‘Now, the only available space for me to set up my staging area was off in the corner of the main room.’
    • ‘Adequate and free parking space is another big boon for shoppers who throng these stores.’
    • ‘Outside, the front garden features a large lawn, a tiled patio area and space to park a fleet of cars.’
    • ‘I think that at least part of the building - and its immediate area - should become a free public space.’
    • ‘Two windows at the front of the house were knocked into one and a wall was removed to free up space.’
    • ‘So he was driving around looking for a free car parking space.’
    • ‘There will also be a new main entrance, landscaping and more car parking space.’
    • ‘Not only are there numerous musicians to choose from, but there are also benefits such as free rehearsal space.’
    • ‘Her one-year-old sister loved the floors too - a vast, smooth expanse of crawling space.’
    • ‘The block has two science labs, a prep room and two more classrooms, freeing up useful space which will be used for other purposes.’
    • ‘He pointed out that the council had not provided one extra parking space.’
    room, expanse, extent, capacity, area, volume, spaciousness, scope, latitude, expansion, margin, leeway, play, clearance
    gap, interval, opening, aperture, gulf, cavity, cranny, fissure, rift, crack, breach, break, split, flaw, crevasse, interstice, lacuna
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 An area of land which is not occupied by buildings.
      ‘she had a love of open spaces’
      • ‘The developer has already encountered opposition from residents in nearby Rowley View, who want the area kept as an open space.’
      • ‘Everyone else on my block plants a flower garden, but they would like my lawn left open as a public space for children to play on, or to walk dogs on.’
      • ‘But she said it would go back to being a grass area and would remain an open space for young people under the age of 12.’
      • ‘The discovery was made when a grader was developing an open space in the town area into a sport field.’
      • ‘About 30 caravans had moved onto an open space beside Fair Oak Road by last Wednesday.’
      • ‘The proposed development would also feature a shop, an open space, landscaping and car parking.’
      • ‘Housing is necessary - so also is the provision of parks, public open space and green areas.’
      • ‘The moor is a vast space of land with lots of tracks and paths.’
      • ‘I, for one, think that dogs should have a lead on anytime, apart from when they are in an open space.’
      • ‘The 20 acres of unused land near Mangalavanam can be converted into an open space.’
      • ‘The housing estate backs onto an open space, which was once a football pitch.’
      • ‘Many of those who are against the proposals say this area should be turned into an open space.’
      • ‘Work is under way on a new play area at the nearby Paxmans Road estate and an open space is due to follow this autumn, which parents hope will ease the problem.’
      • ‘In the short term scheme, intended to last for five years, the building will be replaced by an open space and children's play area.’
      • ‘The trees were growing naturally on a sunny roadside or in an open space, being unshaded by other trees.’
      • ‘It is pleasant to have an open space over which to look from your bedroom and sitting room windows, so far as it is possible to see over the concrete wall.’
      • ‘The derelict building is to be flattened and replaced with a open space and children's play park in the short term scheme.’
      • ‘It includes new houses, low-cost homes, community facilities and an open space to be run by St Osyth Parish Council.’
      • ‘After being found to contain explosives, it is carefully taken by police to an open space and detonated.’
      • ‘The committee had recommended that the site was not to be sold for building purposes but developed as an open space.’
      area, open space, open area, unoccupied area, empty area, expanse, footprint, stretch, sweep, tract
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 An area rented or sold as business premises.
      • ‘And he used the proceeds to rent office space from his father to house a music studio.’
      • ‘The expansion will boost the center to more than 311,000 square feet of retail space.’
      • ‘Two major developments are planned in the city centre to deal with the demand for retail space.’
      • ‘Because she owns the building, the overhead costs for renting commercial space is eliminated because her mortgage payments add to the equity in her property.’
      • ‘The first level will be leased as retail space while the firm will use the second level.’
      • ‘The company benefits, too, because it doesn't have to rent office space for him anymore.’
      • ‘For a while, he rented office space in a townhouse, which came with a swimming pool.’
      • ‘If the amount of community space is unsustainable it could be converted to office space and rented.’
      • ‘Now their workers' cooperative rents its own office space in Mbeya and contributes to agricultural projects for youth.’
      • ‘It was advertising some sort of company that sells or leases office space, I think.’
      • ‘More than the required numbers of firms have applied for office and retail space in the building.’
      • ‘The scheme will have four large floors of retail space and a rooftop restaurant.’
      • ‘The successful purchaser may wish to integrate these two areas to create one large office space.’
      • ‘Days later a current tenant with an adjacent lease asked to rent the same space to expand her business!’
      • ‘Office space in the Southfields business park has been let for the first time for £18.75 per square foot.’
      • ‘Can you convince a business or community center to donate space or offer a reduced rent?’
      • ‘In return, the college will get new office space in the adjoining building.’
      • ‘We don't want to rent expensive office space and have that fixed expense looming over our heads every month.’
      • ‘The market is also seeing a change in the type of retailer looking for space.’
      • ‘The unit contains 49 square metres of office space which is situated to the front of the building.’
    3. 1.3 A blank between printed, typed, or written words, characters, numbers, etc.
      • ‘Note that the Greek New Testament was originally written without punctuation or spaces between words.’
      • ‘The fact that English puts spaces between words, while Chinese does not, accounts for some of this difference.’
      • ‘This time, the sentences run on and on together, but the spaces between the words have now disappeared along with the punctuation.’
      • ‘In the texts of the period, there were no spaces between words, punctuation was meagre, and reading depended on a capacity to see patterns in the unbroken lines.’
      • ‘Articles should be formatted to 65 characters per line or less, including spaces, and written in short paragraph sections.’
      • ‘Personally, I work on a computer first, then print out what I have written, leaving generous spaces for inevitable alterations.’
      • ‘There are much greater spaces between his words than in his earlier poems.’
      • ‘Counting only letters, and ignoring characters like spaces and commas and hyphens, you can see the proof in the definition.’
      blank, empty space, gap
      View synonyms
    4. 1.4Music Each of the four gaps between the five lines of a staff.
      • ‘You can use a word or silly sentence to help you memorize which notes belong on the lines or spaces of a clef.’
      • ‘While devices abound for remembering the names of the lines and spaces of the treble and bass clefs, children often do not remember which saying is for which clef and then which is for lines and which for spaces.’
      • ‘A gifted music teacher, he even devised his own system of music writing with four spaces between five lines to show the strings and the numbers from zero to four to guide the fingers.’
      • ‘B on the A string, a perfect fifth higher, is one space above the top line or three staff spaces above the E.’
      • ‘If we go up three spaces into the treble clef or down three into the bass, we will find C again.’
  • 2The dimensions of height, depth, and width within which all things exist and move.

    ‘the work gives the sense of a journey in space and time’
    • ‘Law is one such labyrinth, a concept or abstraction like time, space, or identity, devised to create order out of chaos.’
    • ‘Furthermore, could we explore the idea of the body as a dynamic nonlinear hologram existing within a fractal space?’
    • ‘Eventually the aesthetics cancel each other out and it's just about bodies moving through space.’
    • ‘Dance is an art form that exists simultaneously in space and time.’
    • ‘I'm particularly interested in the geometry, but it is also about recording how people move through space.’
    • ‘We are familiar with three dimensions of space and the fourth dimension of time.’
    • ‘Where these lines converge, there is a tunnel that opens up and moves through space and time into other dimensions.’
    • ‘These are equations involving the rate of change of quantities either in time, or in space, or in both, and are a part of calculus.’
    • ‘Anything that exists within space is by definition finite, no matter how big it gets.’
    • ‘In this way, the bodies of the dancers become linked to the concepts of space, time and transcendence.’
    • ‘It is not love of a real homeland that exists in time and space.’
    • ‘This has involved studies of supersymmetry and, most recently, extra dimensions of space.’
    • ‘However, his work made people rethink old ideas and led to new approaches to the fundamental concepts of space and time.’
    • ‘In life, we exist in space and time: time moves forwards with cause and effect, and we physically move around with our bodies.’
    • ‘He had weekly meetings with her and at her request he entered into dispute with Leibniz over the nature of space and time.’
    • ‘It does not have the same kind of reality as individuals have, for each of them is a substance, existing in space.’
    • ‘It makes my head go dizzy, like when trying to imagine the universe and the concept of infinite space.’
    1. 2.1 The physical universe beyond the earth's atmosphere.
      • ‘The view of our own planet from space is quite literally out of this world.’
      • ‘But the next big area up for grabs is space, and whoever dominates space will dominate the planet.’
      • ‘She made it possible for further studies to enable Man to step off his home planet and survive in space.’
      • ‘His first extended mission in space was a stay aboard Mir in 1988.’
      • ‘In the future as in the present, humanity still yearns to reach out into space and explore the stars.’
      • ‘In space, as on Earth, there is no such thing as a free lunch - not to mention a free launch.’
      • ‘Apparently Turkey is planning to send a rocket into space and explore a planet, by 2014.’
      • ‘But he was ignored because of his wild ideas, like the proposition that life came to Earth from space.’
      • ‘Simply put, a space elevator is a revolutionary way of getting from Earth into space.’
      • ‘Patrick talks to Dr Duncan Steel about the threat of objects in space colliding with Earth.’
      • ‘The Aurora is able to fly from the atmosphere into space and then return to Earth.’
      • ‘Here on Earth and out in space, communications would seem to be important if we need to defend ourselves from enemies.’
      • ‘The space around the Earth is more dangerous than scientists thought, according to new research.’
      • ‘For instance, consider the problem of launching a vehicle from Earth into space.’
      • ‘If this is the true shape of the universe, it means space is finite.’
      outer space, deep space, the universe, the cosmos, the galaxy, the solar system, infinity
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2 The near vacuum extending between the planets and stars, containing small amounts of gas and dust.
      • ‘Now we're looking for extrasolar planets, space still has the capacity to make me excited.’
      • ‘Today I announce a new plan to explore space and extend a human presence across our solar system.’
      • ‘She finds the study of space, physics and the origin and faiths of the universe fascinating.’
      • ‘Any rocks - like asteroids, or bits of other planets blown into space by volcanoes - are more likely to hit us than the moon.’
      • ‘Sunlight vaporizes the ice, opening fissures which spew gas and dust into space.’
      • ‘Beyond the window, space stretched out to infinity, looking coldly back at them.’
      • ‘An asteroid tears through space heading towards the fourth planet from the sun: Mars.’
      • ‘The growth process is slower in space than on earth, which could lead to a higher quality crystal growth process.’
      • ‘Experts agree that the rate at which the Earth travels through space has slowed ever so slightly for millennia.’
      • ‘There could be a lot more space beyond that and there could even be other Big Bangs apart from the ones of which we are the aftermath.’
      • ‘Radiation from the Big Bang fireball has been travelling across the universe, cooling as space expands, they say.’
      • ‘It will also test the theory that the Earth drags space along with it as it spins’
      • ‘A lunar eclipse occurs when the moon passes into the earth's shadow in space.’
      • ‘He drew a map of the world as it was then known and calculated the angle of tilt of the earth in space.’
      • ‘It has a thick chemical rich atmosphere that extends more than three times as far into space as Earth's.’
      • ‘With Sun and Moon aligned on either side of the Earth, the Moon passes through the shadow projected by the Earth into space.’
      • ‘Morin remained firmly convinced that the Earth was fixed in space.’
      • ‘Most newly discovered comets seem to originate from an area in space known as the Oort cloud, named after Dutch astronomer Jan Oort.’
      • ‘Just about anyone who has ever looked up at the stars has wondered if space goes on forever, or if perhaps it ends somewhere.’
    3. 2.3Mathematics A mathematical concept generally regarded as a set of points having some specified structure.
      • ‘Our interest is in the space of affine equivalence classes of equal-area polygons.’
      • ‘Up to this stage quantum theory was set up in Euclidean space and used Cartesian tensors of linear and angular momentum.’
      • ‘The maths syllabus covers algebra, shape and space, mental arithmetic, handling data and measures.’
      • ‘However he continued to work on topological ideas, in particular embedding complexes in Euclidean space.’
      • ‘He worked on conjugate functions in multidimensional euclidean space and the theory of functions of a complex variable.’
  • 3An interval of time (often used to suggest that the time is short considering what has happened or been achieved in it)

    ‘both their cars were stolen in the space of three days’
    • ‘And the fact that I have now been given 3 interviews in a relatively short space of time must mean something.’
    • ‘During his time as a script reader he had the opportunity to read over 2000 screenplays in the space of two years.’
    • ‘In the space of a few short months, he went from being master of a continent to a fugitive.’
    • ‘This was all the more amazing when one considers the short space of time in which it was all organised.’
    • ‘Rasputin achieved huge power in a very short space of time - but that power lead to Rasputin having many enemies within Russia.’
    • ‘A woman picked up by police for being drunk three times in the space of a few days had a tragic past, Swindon magistrates were told.’
    • ‘Supervisor Betty was proud of all they had achieved in the space of a year.’
    • ‘Whether intentioned or not, that world was lost to us and to much of history in the space of a few short decades.’
    • ‘He took up mountaineering in 1993 and in the space of 12 years has achieved a great track record.’
    • ‘There is no doubt about it, when good people get together and work hard an amazing amount can be achieved in a short space of time.’
    • ‘All of that build-up for Christmas, and it's replaced by another holiday in the space of a day.’
    • ‘Now all of this is possible and achievable in the space of a few hours.’
    • ‘But, of course, this will go no way to replacing the two lives cut short in the space of just a few tragic seconds.’
    • ‘In the space of a few months the price of drinking water had risen by two and a half times.’
    • ‘Detectives say there have been at least eight incidents involving youths hurling missiles in the space of 10 days.’
    • ‘Golden Week is a group of three national holidays in the space of five days.’
    • ‘However, while I am desperate for overnight success I think we have also achieved quite a lot in a very short space of time.’
    • ‘Khan said this was a double blow to the company and its employees in the short space of two months.’
    • ‘To produce a report of this calibre in the space of one year was an achievement of which we at Charlestown are very proud.’
    • ‘The health inspectors had only visited twice in the space of the 12 months.’
    period, span, time, duration, stretch, course, interval, season, term
    View synonyms
  • 4The portion of a text or document available or needed to write about a subject.

    ‘there is no space to give further details’
    • ‘Please allow me space in your great paper to congratulate one outstanding Namibian artist on a job well done.’
    • ‘As the days went on papers gave even more space to the sensation.’
    • ‘Those three teams have to compete for the same group of fans and for the same space in the local papers.’
    • ‘The exam crunch is back, but I'm not going to waste precious space writing about it.’
    • ‘There's plenty more where that came from but unfortunately not enough space to write about it.’
    • ‘There are a few questions that ask for written responses and you may find that the poll does not allow you enough space to write what you want to say.’
    • ‘If you can reach the blackboard there is a wide range of coloured chalk, but no space to write.’
    • ‘Last year I wrote in this space about the reasons we had found his proposal so exciting.’
    • ‘We had extra space, the editors said after I wrote to them in panic, so we gave it to you.’
    • ‘Even though the news did not hit the headlines, it surely took up considerable space as papers fawned over her deeds.’
    • ‘It is impossible in this space to subject even a few shows to exhaustive analysis.’
    • ‘I pulled over a wooden box of papers, not one of which had value except in how much space was left for writing.’
    • ‘We need to ask why Paul devotes so much space to the subject in writing to the Corinthians, while saying little about it to other churches.’
    • ‘Perhaps he could be given space in the paper to put his case properly.’
    • ‘Greg flips the chart over so that Doug has some space to write his message.’
    • ‘Although I do not have enough space to write a full response I will do my best.’
    • ‘As I wrote in this space last month, polls on this issue probably tend to exaggerate support for us.’
    • ‘Please allow me space in your paper to air my view as a citizen of a democratic and independent Namibia.’
    • ‘You're given your own copy editor, space in the paper, and you do what you want with it.’
    • ‘I'm at a loss to know why we don't get more space in the papers.’
    1. 4.1 Pages in a newspaper, or time between television or radio programs, available for advertising.
      • ‘She then got a job in telesales selling advertising space for newspapers and airtime for radio, and discovered her vocation.’
      • ‘It was always a mystery why cash flow was so poor, given that he openly sold editorial as well as advertising space.’
      • ‘Games of other sorts take up three or four pages of advertising space in the local free weeklies.’
      • ‘Such swings make headlines, selling newspapers and advertising space.’
      • ‘The biggest purchasers of advertising space are not expanding companies but recruitment agencies.’
      • ‘The new title began selling advertising space cheaply, eating into the revenues from the other titles.’
      • ‘But to me it seemed no different from a publisher paying for advertisement space in a newspaper.’
      • ‘He buys ad space in newspapers to press his case, but the committee is hanging tough.’
      • ‘The majority of revenue comes from selling advertising space on the radio stations.’
      • ‘The third tactic is the purchasing of broadcast time and advertising space from existing independent media.’
      • ‘Labor's spokesman has added up the cost of buying that much space in the papers.’
      • ‘He is under no pressure to disclose circulation figures, given that he is not selling space to advertisers.’
      • ‘Could it be that scandal and gore sells papers and advertising space on TV and radio?’
    2. 4.2 Capacity for storage of data in a computer or other digital device.
      ‘additional disk space is required for the database operation’
      ‘delete songs from your iPod should you start running out of space’
  • 5The freedom and scope to live, think, and develop in a way that suits one.

    ‘a teenager needing her own space’
    • ‘That's the sort of space Blake needs to develop his ideas exhaustively with cogency and imagination.’
    • ‘No character is here just to provide a punch line, with everyone being given enough space to develop and grow.’
    • ‘He tried to play down his importance to the team, saying he is still young and needs space to develop.’
    • ‘You seek freedom and space in a romantic involvement and make bold manoeuvres towards a new way of life.’
    • ‘Freedom and space in relationships and partnerships brings out the best in you.’
    • ‘We don't give ourselves enough space and freedom to explore, to make mistakes, and to find out who we really are.’
    • ‘They need space and freedom to run their units and develop as independent leaders.’
    • ‘A steady routine which offers much in the way of security but little in the way of space and freedom is odious to you’
    • ‘You may feel oppressed by people in control and a lack of freedom and space to be creative.’
    • ‘Then there's the question of allowing the talent time and space to develop.’
    • ‘I am a growing and blossoming young woman and I need my space and freedom to grow.’
    • ‘You opt for freedom in relationships and space in work situations today.’
    • ‘We, in our everyday lives often lack the freedom and space for the spiritual and the eternal.’
    freedom, scope, a free hand, leeway, latitude, elbow room, space, room, flexibility, liberty, independence, play, slack, free play, leisure, licence, room to manoeuvre, scope for initiative, freedom of action, freedom from restriction, indulgence, laxity, margin
    View synonyms
  • 6Telecommunications
    One of two possible states of a signal in certain systems.

    The opposite of mark (sense 2 of the noun)

verb

  • 1usually be spacedwith object Position (two or more items) at a distance from one another.

    ‘the houses are spaced out’
    • ‘The platforms were spaced 90 cm apart, each directly in front of a hole in the plexiglas partition.’
    • ‘But a key element of the new practices is an emphasis on spacing beds far enough apart to prevent the spread of infection.’
    • ‘The doors were spaced about five feet apart, but again, I didn't note that it was significant.’
    • ‘She then transplanted very young seedlings, using very little water and spacing the seedlings well.’
    • ‘Arrange the bulbs carefully, spacing them closer than you would in the ground, but ensure they don't touch.’
    • ‘Residences are well spaced over the village, which gives pleasant viewing while travelling along the roads.’
    • ‘Darren and Matt were spaced very far apart, each at the edge of the path.’
    • ‘Thus it's important to think ahead when locating and spacing your tomato plants.’
    • ‘The microphones were spaced only a few feet apart and there were a lot of them.’
    • ‘Strained silicon involves depositing silicon onto a substrate whose atoms are spaced further apart than silicon atoms usually are.’
    • ‘Family mementos and photographs were carefully spaced along the mantelpiece above a gas fireplace.’
    • ‘The distance points are spaced equally on either side of the vanishing point.’
    • ‘She didn't even liked the fact that the buildings were spaced further apart than in bigger cities.’
    • ‘My hope is that the clouds will lift during the climb, and we can space the markers farther apart.’
    • ‘The tables are well spaced, with enough room for about 80 diners.’
    • ‘The lights were spaced three feet apart, just enough to cast an eerie glow over the stairs.’
    • ‘The beach loungers are well spaced apart and you can walk straight into the sea.’
    • ‘The foils move slowly and are spaced sufficiently apart to allow fish passage.’
    • ‘After all, the rungs of the ladder are spaced so far apart that no real person can climb it.’
    • ‘Tables on both floors are thankfully spaced widely apart so that you do not have to listen to the other tables' conversations.’
    place at intervals, separate, place, position, arrange, line up, range, order, array, dispose, lay out, deploy, locate, settle, situate, set, stand, station
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (in printing or writing) put blanks between (words, letters, or lines)
      ‘the default setting is single line spacing’
      • ‘It was addressed to her in large fancy letters evenly spaced and formed.’
      • ‘Use permanent markers to avoid smudging, and place a sheet of ruled paper underneath so that the writing is evenly spaced.’
      • ‘With print design, we have precise control over spacing between letters, words and lines of text.’
      • ‘It was double spaced and under some of the black inked writing was writing in red.’
      • ‘To do that, I had to measure the old type and match font, body size, leading, and letter spacing exactly.’
      • ‘Why is it that when you edit a post, the line spacing goes weird?’
      • ‘I notice US covers use more serifs and more covers have titles with lots of letter spacing.’
      • ‘They are several printing / spacing errors and the index of the book is not very accurate and far from complete.’
      • ‘Hmmm, I did not mess up the line spacing between the dialogues, but if it makes it hard to read, I will fix it.’
      • ‘The body of the manuscript must be double spaced, and margins should be at least one inch all around.’
      • ‘The length of each copy is represented by the closely spaced horizontal lines.’
      • ‘Now, it may seem odd to focus on letter spacing, but it's been a holy grail of the printing industries since the beginning.’
      • ‘Adjustments that are possible include changes to colours, background, text sizes, line spacing and fonts.’
      • ‘There are many ways to go about spacing typefaces and this isn't meant to be definitive.’
      • ‘Thus, the basic letter forms and spacing for a word printed with or without diacritics remain unchanged.’
      • ‘There were eleven perfectly straight, evenly spaced lines drawn on another blackboard.’
  • 2be spaced out" or "space outinformal Be or become distracted, euphoric, or disoriented, especially from taking drugs; cease to be aware of one's surroundings.

    ‘I was so tired that I began to feel totally spaced out’
    ‘I kind of space out for a few minutes’
    • ‘I don't think I even took notes, I kept spacing out.’
    • ‘He was totally spacing out as he made his way down the hallway.’
    • ‘I've been on a work drive and am feeling totally spaced out, so forgive my incoherence.’
    • ‘As for me, I was feeling a little spaced out and tired from my trip across the pond yesterday.’
    • ‘I tried to get Alex to realize how vulnerable he was at eleven years old, but Alex retreated into a daze - I thought he might be taking drugs, but Alex assured me that he was just spacing out.’
    • ‘For a good part of the beginning of the trip, I space out.’
    • ‘What makes it weirder is that I was totally spaced out when I was writing that essay.’
    • ‘She was spaced out, her eyes bloodshot from the lack of a fix.’
    • ‘You space out a lot; it's beginning to freak even me out.’
    • ‘You've been spacing out ever since first period!’
    stupefied, insensible, befuddled
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • watch this space

    • informal Further developments are expected and more information will be given later.

      • ‘A lot more information will be provided in the coming weeks, so watch this space.’
      • ‘Many more interests will be catered for, so watch this space for more information.’
      • ‘A special gig to launch this anti-war movement will take place shortly; watch this space for further developments.’
      • ‘More details should follow soon, so watch this space!’
      • ‘For further information on the band's progress, including gigs, watch this space.’
      • ‘Another bigger ‘brand sale’ is in the offing so watch this space for more information about dates and times.’
      • ‘Get your tickets early folks, this one is going to sell out fast, and watch this space for even more information closer to the date.’
      • ‘There is also said to be another major development in the pipeline, so watch this space for more on a very local success story.’
      • ‘Therefore, keep watching this space for some interesting stuff in the next few weeks.’
      • ‘The next meeting is provisionally planned for Wednesday 2nd November, but watch this space for time and place!’

Origin

Middle English: shortening of Old French espace, from Latin spatium. Current verb senses date from the late 17th century.

Pronunciation

space

/speɪs//spās/