Definition of souffle in English:

souffle

noun

Medicine
  • A low murmuring or blowing sound heard through a stethoscope.

    • ‘If you are hearing a rapid pulsating noise with the stethoscope it is probably the "placental souffle" which is the sound of the blood pulsating through the placenta, and not the fetal heart.’

Origin

Late 19th century: from French, from souffler to blow from Latin sufflare.

Pronunciation:

souffle

/ˈso͞ofəl/

Definition of soufflé in English:

soufflé

noun

  • 1A light, spongy baked dish made typically by adding flavored egg yolks to stiffly beaten egg whites.

    • ‘Even seven-and-a-half minutes is long enough to kill a soufflé.’
    • ‘How I look is the last thing on my mind as I'm trying to cook a soufflé or a dessert in 20 minutes.’
    • ‘I scooped up a spoonful: the soufflé was airy, eggy, and sweet, with a thin crust of sugar where it met the ramekin's edge.’
    • ‘Bake soufflés for 12-15 minutes.’
    • ‘When their time comes, he and Edwina have got the soufflés just right, but the tatins are so over-caramelised they're like charcoal.’
    • ‘I kneeled to peer at them through the oven window and watched as they began to bronze and puff like miniature soufflés.’
    • ‘Get married, own a business, have children, run a marathon, care for a dying relative, bake a perfect soufflé, practice yoga.’
    • ‘Not only do they thicken and enrich sauces, bind stuffings, lighten and expand on whisking to create soufflés and meringues, they can also be cooked in a variety of ways to serve as a meal in their own right.’
    • ‘We all go a little bit silly over soufflés, but the trick to a great one is not magic, it's science.’
    • ‘You do know your chef is known not only for his soufflés, but for his excellence in creating dessert masterpieces, don't you?’
    • ‘It takes no special skill to breathe, nor does it take any special talent to make a soufflé.’
    • ‘There is always a soufflé on the a la carte and the lunch menu.’
    • ‘Continue with the soufflés by whisking the egg whites until soft peaks form.’
    • ‘Eggs have so much potential - a soufflé, cakes, crème brûlée, salmon mousse - or just a good, open omelette filled with seasonal vegetables.’
    • ‘Beneath its delicate, crackling exterior, the ricotta was warm, meltingly soft and cloudlike, some ethereal intermediate between soufflé and softly scrambled egg.’
    • ‘I attempt to redress the balance with these little chocolate puddings - fluffy outside and molten within, a cross between a soufflé and a sponge pudding.’
    • ‘It could barely have been better: the soufflé was light and moist, and perfectly complemented by a rich, creamy sauce given an edge by the confit.’
    • ‘Never mind soufflé, meringue or mayonnaise, most Britons are left looking like culinary oafs by the simple oeuf.’
    • ‘In the 17th century, cooks discovered that beating egg whites in copper bowls gave body and volume to exciting new foams which they could set as meringues and soufflés.’
    • ‘I finally got the soufflé in the oven and started on the chocolate tart, only to realize that we didn't have cocoa.’
    1. 1.1 Any of various light dishes made with beaten egg whites.
      • ‘He's even conjured up a fluffy passion-fruit soufflé, which you can bomb with a ball of freshly made coconut sorbet.’
      • ‘The hot cinder toffee soufflé with treacle sauce will make sweet-tooths swoon.’
      • ‘Desserts included the usual suspects of sorbet, ice-cream, creme brulée and lemon soufflé, but the real star of the show was the chocolate fondue, which was available for two, three or six people.’
      • ‘The best of the classic items was the crème caramel; the worst, unaccountably, was the chocolate soufflé.’
      • ‘The best dessert by far is the ‘fallen chocolate soufflé,’ but don't bother traveling all the way downtown to sample it.’
      • ‘My first thought was to go very basic, and make either a cheese or a chocolate soufflé.’
      • ‘If you want to set someone special up in the kitchen to conjure up anything as simple as a scrambled eggs to a zucchini soufflé, this place is a good bet.’
      • ‘The finished product was a mouth-watering menu with a starter of pan seared sea scallops followed by crusted beef tournedos and finally raspberry soufflé.’
      • ‘Order the pint-size chocolate soufflé, spiked with hazelnut-flavored crème anglaise.’
      • ‘As for the prune and Armagnac soufflé, were it any lighter it would float up to the ceiling.’
      • ‘There's a respectable cheese tray for dessert, and two varieties of soufflé (banana-pecan and citrus Grand Marnier) served in little cast-iron pots.’
      • ‘Pudding was arguably the highlight of our meal, with Vicky's rhubarb crumble soufflé with crème fraîche sorbet a genuine triumph and one of the best desserts I've tried in ages.’
      • ‘The savoury assault over, it was time to contemplate pudding: a raspberry soufflé which came with a little glass of something resembling a posh milkshake with raspberry sauce at the bottom.’
      • ‘There was a fine little twice-baked Stilton soufflé with winter squash and a tricksy cumin foam, and there was a foam, too, on the artichoke soup, on which there also floated a small and perfectly presented poached egg.’
      • ‘Fiona started with the spinach soufflé, goat's cheese sauce and confit tomato.’
      • ‘Ten dollars will buy you a decent pistachio soufflé, and there's also a deliciously gingery variety of spice cake on the menu, with caramel-roasted apples and Calvados ice cream.’
      • ‘The girls, suitably stuffed and speechless, decided to share a dessert, a hot jaffa soufflé with chocolate sauce and chocolate orange ice cream.’
      • ‘For dessert Abi and I both had the dark chocolate soufflé with apricot sorbet.’
      • ‘The soufflé of Parmesan cheese served on a bed of creamy spinach for €7.35 won out in the end.’
      • ‘The rice pudding deserves to follow the chicken hash, however, and the chocolate soufflé isn't worth the wait.’

Origin

French, literally blown past participle of souffler (see souffle).

Pronunciation:

soufflé

/so͞oˈflā/