Definition of sore in English:

sore

adjective

  • 1(of a part of one's body) painful or aching.

    ‘my feet were sore and my head ached’
    • ‘A sudden onset of high fever, headache, a transient body rash, a sore throat and cough are the first signs.’
    • ‘It usually focuses on specific areas of the body, such as sore joints or muscles, to improve mobility and reduce pain.’
    • ‘In diphtheria, the throat is moderately sore, with tender cervical adenopathy.’
    • ‘I mean headache, sore throat, muscle ache, stomachache, fever, and all that good stuff.’
    • ‘My body was still sore from the onslaught and I had not moved the few times I had woken.’
    • ‘It's possible that one may get a low-grade fever, slight sore throat, or muscle aches in the 24 hours following a flu shot.’
    • ‘After waking up with a sore throat, slight fever, and aches all over, I'm now realizing it's a good day to be sick.’
    • ‘Every part of his body was sore, and he felt extremely exhausted, like he had been working non-stop for a week.’
    • ‘By Tuesday, your throat is sore, your joints ache and you feel lousy.’
    • ‘Her entire body was soon sore as she managed to sit up, rubbing at her throbbing head, trying to massage her temples.’
    • ‘It is known to help treat wounds, sore gums and throats and even acne.’
    • ‘Some people also have a fever, a sore throat, deep tiredness and body aches.’
    • ‘Her whole body was sore, and she felt ready to go to bed.’
    • ‘A sore throat is excruciating, but when it is coupled with a fever and a headache and a clogged up nose, it is more than miserable.’
    • ‘Potential side-effects include sensitivity of the teeth to hot and cold, a sore throat, tender gums and white patches on the gums.’
    • ‘Bobby felt quite a bit better the following morning, but his entire body was still sore.’
    • ‘Topical pain relievers are creams, lotions, or sprays that you put on your skin to relieve pain from sore muscles and arthritis.’
    • ‘Common symptoms of the flu include headache, chills, a dry cough, aches and fever and a sore throat.’
    • ‘My whole body was sore and my legs ached as I made my way to the cafeteria.’
    • ‘He winced slightly as pain shot from his sore ankle and into his knee.’
    painful, in pain, hurting, hurt, aching, throbbing, smarting, stinging, burning, irritating, irritated, agonizing, excruciating
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    1. 1.1predicative Suffering pain from a part of one's body.
      ‘he was sore from the long ride’
      • ‘I'm already so sore inside that a little pain outside might actually be welcome, to create some equilibrium.’
      • ‘The landing stunned me and I was really sore and in pain.’
      • ‘I might be extremely sore today, but I was still managing to mix it up quite successfully with belts of my level last night…’
      • ‘He was extremely sore but exhilarated at the same time.’
      • ‘Either way, never use more weight than you can handle with perfect form, and slow down if you feel pain during a workout or are especially sore or stiff the next day.’
      • ‘Even though all the pain was gone, I was still very sore and got tired easily which I didn't understand.’
      • ‘He said he was stiff and sore but had no serious injuries.’
      • ‘I burst in to tears again, I quickly stumbled out of my bed, trying to run away, forgetting I was extremely sore.’
    2. 1.2North American informal predicative Upset and angry.
      ‘I didn't even know they were sore at us’
      • ‘An old man was sore at having come to know about it so late in my life.’
      • ‘What really made people sore was a system of political cronyism that awarded jobs and benefits to ruling party sympathizers.’
      • ‘He looked at his buddies, all of whom were looking particularly sore at his victory.’
      • ‘I'm sore from the hurt, from anger, from being left or having to leave, sore from all of that uninterrupted feeling.’
      • ‘The youth crowd around him and some take pictures; party activists feel sore at being kept away from him.’
      • ‘Are you sore you missed out on the WotW trophy this week?’
      • ‘Had he been in a good mood, he might have spared me some suffering, but I'm sure he was still sore at me for yesterday morning.’
      • ‘Bear and Tiger became my friend but falcon was still sore at me for nearly killing him the first time we meet in the master's house.’
      • ‘The Pacific Islander community is surely sore at being left out.’
      • ‘. He was angry, now, sore as a skunk and with enough whisky inside him to keep Jim Beam going for ten years or so.’
      • ‘Kamaria glowered, still sore at having not noticed Link's talent sooner and angry at Linden for agreeing with him.’
      • ‘And the politically correct meddlers, abiding in the town halls and government departments of the land, were sore annoyed.’
      • ‘The British are particularly sore at the moment, because they believe the IRA has the upper hand in what is essentially a phoney war.’
      • ‘I yelled too loud, but I was sore, angry and tired of being used as a large punching bag by a spoiled four-year old.’
      upset, angry, annoyed, cross, angered, furious, enraged, in a temper, bothered, vexed, displeased, disgruntled, dissatisfied, indignant, exasperated, irritated, galled, irked, put out, aggrieved, offended, affronted, resentful, piqued, nettled, ruffled, in high dudgeon
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    3. 1.3attributive Severe; urgent.
      ‘we're in sore need of him’
      • ‘He said the annual extravaganza, held in Aberystwyth, was in sore need of funds.’
      dire, urgent, pressing, desperate, critical, crucial, acute, grave, serious, intense, crying, burning, compelling, drastic, extreme, life-and-death, great, very great, terrible
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noun

  • 1A raw or painful place on the body.

    ‘we had sores on our hands’
    • ‘A mouth ulcer is a painful sore in the mouth on either the cheeks or gums.’
    • ‘For the animals, they develop nasty, fluid-filled sores all over their bodies.’
    • ‘The water is completely polluted in all of these villages and the people have horrible sores on their bodies.’
    • ‘Peptic ulcers are open sores that develop on the inside lining of your stomach, upper small intestine or esophagus.’
    • ‘Painful spots or blisters turn into open sores, which scab over and heal.’
    • ‘In late summer this year, she was found wandering around South Milford, near Selby, covered in painful sores and having difficulty in breathing.’
    • ‘Or you can mix 25 drops into 100 ml of hot water and gently apply to cuts, abrasions, sores and ulcers.’
    • ‘Some women are missing limbs, some women have sores over their body.’
    • ‘You can use them to treat sores, bruises, cuts, boils and inflammatory skin conditions.’
    • ‘After a few days, of course, the Avalyskians began to notice sores on their bodies and realized something was up.’
    • ‘Children with Coxsackie virus may become dehydrated because mouth sores can make it painful to eat and drink.’
    • ‘He had red sores all over his body, and his skin and hair was white.’
    • ‘People generally try to avoid brown recluse spiders because their bites fester into painful sores.’
    • ‘So she was left alone, with her body full of sores, especially on her head.’
    • ‘The sores are sometimes very painful but generally heal in 1 to 2 weeks without scarring.’
    • ‘Melphalan may cause nausea, vomiting diarrhea, and severe mucositis with painful mouth sores.’
    • ‘He was lean and muscular, but painful scars and sores ran across his body like tattoos.’
    • ‘There were open sores and wounds all over her body and she was hardly able to walk.’
    • ‘Your partner could pass the infection to you even if there are no painful sores.’
    • ‘One of the sores on her body had penetrated to the bone.’
    inflammation, swelling, lesion
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    1. 1.1 A cause or source of distress or annoyance.
      ‘there's no point raking over the past and opening old sores’
      • ‘Saturn points to all the open sores and cherished old wounds where we feel vulnerable to attack.’
      • ‘Now her neighbours are campaigning for action to eradicate the problem, which has been a running sore in the neighbourhood for several years.’
      • ‘For most of Elizabeth's reign, Ireland remained a festering sore in the Tudor body politic.’
      • ‘His case was a microcosm of a large, festering sore in the body of the entire Catholic Church.’
      • ‘Regardless of its symbolic significance, however, Sangatte remains a pressing problem in its own right, and a running sore in Anglo-French relations.’
      • ‘The report adverts to a problem, which was to become a running sore, of allocating cash received by VKV to particular invoices.’
      • ‘Perhaps it does not go too far to assert that until the Kashmir sore is at last healed, the poison that produced Gujarat will make other Gujarats increasingly likely.’
      • ‘Old sores weighed heavily on his mind and he vowed to repay them.’
      • ‘It was a nasty game where old sores festered and attempts were made to settle long standing bitterness.’
      • ‘The traditionalists of the discontinuant left keep scratching the same old sores.’
      • ‘One poor display does not make a team a bad one, but problems that had been festering broke out into full-blown sores.’
      • ‘The Secretary argued that the reopening of all these old sores would benefit none but Germany.’

adverb

archaic
  • Extremely; severely.

    ‘they were sore afraid’
    • ‘The eclipse started, the natives were sore afraid, and Columbus eventually agreed to ‘return the Moon’ in return for food.’
    • ‘And, lo, the angel of the Lord came upon them, and the glory of the Lord shone round about them; and they were sore afraid.’
    • ‘The men were sore afraid, but such was the confidence of Moses they were willing to follow him.’
    • ‘And such men were sore afraid for the sons of Kahn.’
    • ‘I pounded on her door, and as I did I heard my own heart pounding, for I was sore afraid that someone might be up and after me.’
    very, extremely, exceedingly, exceptionally, especially, tremendously, immensely, vastly, hugely
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Phrases

  • sore point

    • A subject or issue about which someone feels distressed or annoyed.

      ‘money was a sore point between us’
      • ‘She knew that had always been a sore point between them.’
      • ‘At a recent post-dinner drink I had with the man in Berlin, the sting of the crowd (some of whom booed him off the stage before a proposed encore) was still a sore point.’
      • ‘Another issue that constitutes a sore point in international criminal proceedings is the media coverage of the detention and trial of the accused.’
      • ‘The question of the Western Sahara remains one of the most intractable Arab-African problems, as well as a long-lasting sore point between Algeria and Morocco.’
      • ‘This development came after the company found that after-sales service has become a sore point with consumers purchasing consumer electronics and durables in the market.’
      • ‘American carriers, always a sore point for the enemy since the ships had escaped the devastating attack on Pearl Harbor, were the prime targets in the Philippine invasion.’
      • ‘What is perhaps even more disturbing is that the PM made absolutely no mention of security measures at the nation's schools - what has been a sore point for certain principals as well.’
      • ‘‘That's a major sore point for a lot of people,’ he said.’
      • ‘Not long ago the issue of my height had been something of a sore point with me.’
      • ‘A man's roots are always a sore point to him, especially when he doesn't believe they run deep enough to support the tree he's currently hanging from.’
  • stand (or stick) out like a sore thumb

    • Be obviously different from the surrounding people or things.

      • ‘The centre has stuck out like a sore thumb for many, many years and at last something is being done.’
      • ‘Is it going to be really stuck out like a sore thumb or is it going to blend in with the rolling hills and the space in that area?’
      • ‘We stuck out like a sore thumb: all pale skin and wearing black.’
      • ‘The structure is the most terrible garish monstrosity - it sticks out like a sore thumb in the green belt.’
      • ‘It will come as a relief to residents of Old Broadway, all of whom were fiercely opposed to something that would have stuck out like a sore thumb.’
      • ‘From a distance the house sticks out like a sore thumb across the countryside.’
      • ‘I stood out like a sore thumb in my lisle knee-socks and street clothes.’
      • ‘The Times said that the theft was clearly the work of ‘a suspect, a scientist [who] stuck out like a sore thumb.’’
      • ‘The café was busy and loud, if people took the time to notice, we stood out like a sore thumb.’
      • ‘I stuck out like a sore thumb because I was brought up to be polite and people are not quite sincere there.’

Origin

Old English sār (noun and adjective), sāre (adverb), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch zeer ‘sore’ and German sehr ‘very’. The original sense was ‘causing intense pain, grievous’, whence the adverbial use.

Pronunciation

sore

/sɔr//sôr/