Definition of solicitor in English:

solicitor

noun

North American
  • 1A person who tries to obtain business orders, advertising, etc.; a canvasser.

    • ‘And if that's not bad enough, now I've got telephone solicitors calling me for charity donations.’
    • ‘I filled out the form, asking whether they actually used phone solicitors to sell account renewals.’
    • ‘There were a couple of computer solicitors, and Fred called a bunch of times.’
    • ‘I think I have found the best way to handle telephone solicitors.’
    • ‘Telephone solicitors have no sense of privacy nor know when to call.’
  • 2The chief law officer of a city, town, or government department.

    • ‘Chief Operating Officer David Sanko announced that Guy Matthews, Bucks County’s first full-time county solicitor, has submitted a letter of intent to retire.’
    • ‘The president of the United States and the vice president of the United States should not be the solicitors in chief.’
    • ‘He was chosen the first solicitor of the city, and a member of the first board of trustees of the public library.’
    1. 2.1British A member of the legal profession qualified to deal with conveyancing, the drawing up of wills, and other legal matters.
      • ‘He had the benefit of legal aid to instruct, and did instruct, solicitors and counsel to represent him at his trial.’
      • ‘On 26th August 1997 her solicitors obtained an order for the transfer of the action to the High Court in London.’
      • ‘A council spokesman said it has instructed its solicitors to initiate legal proceedings to the High Court.’
      • ‘Should you be able to sue barristers and solicitors who are negligent in acting for you in a legal case?’
      • ‘The case concerned a claim for damages arising from the negligence of a solicitor instructed in a conveyancing transaction.’
      • ‘Under a court-approved agreement, the Department of Trade and Industry paid standard fees to solicitors for each case they handled.’
      • ‘These hourly rates vary, but will certainly be less than London City solicitors ' fees for doing the same work.’
      • ‘The chief state solicitor would then apply to the High Court for arrest warrants for the three, which would trigger a hearing of the court.’
      • ‘If counsel is instructed by a solicitor who is in court, he too should be allowed to attend the discussion.’
      • ‘The maximum level of compensation to be paid to clients by their solicitors for inadequate professional service is to be increased from April next year.’
      • ‘Once the solicitors had been instructed, it seems to me that matters did proceed with sufficient expedition.’
      • ‘She was not represented by a solicitor at her last court appearance.’
      • ‘In this particular instance we are dealing with a solicitor and his client.’
      • ‘She had apparently instructed solicitors to deal with the matter on her behalf.’
      • ‘The two sides of the profession, barristers and solicitors, continue to exist, and both have expanded numerically.’
      • ‘A solicitor was instructed to draw up a new will for the testator.’
      • ‘That would be your solicitor's legal, professional duty, to act on your instructions.’
      • ‘Strict legal rules have to be followed by solicitors when dealing with clients' bills.’
      • ‘A town council has been reminded by a council solicitor to follow the rulebook after a complaint about one of its meetings.’
      • ‘It was not for the bank to question the advice given as this was not a matter for them but a matter between the solicitor and his client.’
      lawyer, legal representative, legal practitioner, legal executive, notary, notary public, advocate, attorney
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting an agent or deputy): from Old French solliciteur, from solliciter (see solicit).

Pronunciation

solicitor

/səˈlɪsədər//səˈlisədər/