Main definitions of sole in English

: sole1sole2sole3

sole1

noun

  • 1The undersurface of a person's foot.

    ‘the soles of their feet were nearly black with dirt’
    • ‘I am feeling numb from the top of my head to the aching soles of my feet.’
    • ‘Henna could also be used to add a red tint to the palms of the hands and the soles of the feet, if that was what one was inclined to do.’
    • ‘But these cancers are only tenuously linked to sunburn - many are found on areas of the body not commonly exposed to the sun, such as the soles of the feet and the buttocks.’
    • ‘These commonly arise in areas of the body not much exposed to the sun, such as the back of the legs, soles of the feet, scalp and buttocks.’
    • ‘As Chinese medicine theories show, a total of 62 reflection points corresponding with different parts of the body are separated on the soles of the feet.’
    • ‘Standing with your feet together, inhale, use your hand to lift your left leg up, and exhale, placing the sole of your left foot on the inside of the right thigh above the knee.’
    • ‘He's the Brother who's always dressed to impress and is well groomed from the top of his head to the soles of his feet.’
    • ‘The rash doesn't itch and is usually on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet.’
    • ‘In the second stage of syphilis, infected individuals get a rash in the mouth, the palms of the hands and the soles of the feet.’
    • ‘The near-invisible larvae lurk in warm, moist soil or sand, infecting their host by penetrating the skin, usually through the soles of the feet.’
    • ‘Spray the cool mist on your face, the back of your neck, and the soles of your feet.’
    • ‘She bows back once more,. lying on the ground, her legs bent under her at the knees, the soles of her feet pressed into her buttocks.’
    • ‘The basic rules of Sumo are simple: the wrestler who either first touches the floor with any part of his body apart from the soles of his feet or who leaves the ring before his opponent, loses.’
    • ‘Podiatry lecturer William Kerr studies the ridges on toes and the soles of the feet in relation to crime and is now ready to apply his knowledge in the field.’
    • ‘Two days later we had to drag him cross-country in a train as the pox blossomed in his mouth, eyes, nose, even the soles of his feet, making it impossible to walk.’
    • ‘Keep the foot just to the outside of your hip, with the sole of your foot facing up and your toes pointing behind you.’
    • ‘By the end of the day I could feel the burn on the soles of my feet, and my skin forming a thick pumice-proof layer to protect itself from future exposure to scorching walkways.’
    • ‘Bend knees outward and press soles of feet together.’
    • ‘Buddhists have always used the swastika as a symbol of resignation, and Buddha is to this day depicted with the symbol all over his chest, arms and the soles of his feet.’
    • ‘Melanomas commonly appear on these ‘non-sun exposed’ parts of the body, like the back of the legs, the soles of the feet and the buttocks.’
    1. 1.1 The section forming the underside of a piece of footwear (typically excluding the heel when this forms a distinct part)
      • ‘Made from premium leather, they feature a lightly-padded footbed and a flexible sole for added walking comfort.’
      • ‘The average pair of bowling shoes will have a set sole or heel that can't be removed or adjusted.’
      • ‘Polish shoes; get new heels or soles if necessary.’
      • ‘There was a tiny manufacturer mark on the heel of the sole.’
      • ‘A better method of sealing heels and soles is to use a hot wax treatment that penetrates the leather, fills its pores, and prevents water from being absorbed.’
      • ‘Opt for a pair with a bit of a heel, and leather soles.’
      • ‘They had a thick sole with a short heel and were entirely black except for the dark blue laces that tied up the side.’
      • ‘As a rule of thumb, you can wear brown footwear with a black jacket, as long as your soles are predominantly black and you match them with a brown belt.’
      • ‘Tap shoes have thin metal plates, usually made of aluminium, screwed onto the sole and heel, allowing dancers to create percussive effects as they move.’
      • ‘Wear a simple pair of black leather shoes, with a plain or capped toe, and if you choose, leather soles.’
      • ‘The group is looking at manufacturing doormats and shoe soles out of recycled footwear.’
      • ‘In my day the boots were made from tough leather with a very hard leather toecap and leather studs nailed into the sole and heel.’
      • ‘Place shoes on the floor: If the heels and soles aren't sitting flat on the floor, it's time to go shoe-shopping.’
      • ‘His job entails patching, sewing, replacing heels, replacing soles and fine polishing.’
      • ‘Mephisto makes shoes with a 100 percent biodegradable latex midsole, a natural rubber sole, and a footbed made of pure natural cork.’
      • ‘This model offers the best of both worlds - a stiff sole for exercising at the gym and great traction for running or walking outdoors.’
      • ‘My guess is that if the surface is more like the bottom of a crepe sole, it will squeak less than if the soles were like that of a pair of tennis shoes.’
      • ‘I have a pair that I've been wearing for eight years - the soles are somewhat worn down but they have at least another couple of years to go before the tread disappears.’
      • ‘Besides his exquisitely tooled creations, he is credited with having invented the platform sole and wedge heel, which have had a recent comeback in fashion.’
      • ‘These sneakers serve the same purpose as boots, as their nylon and leather build, solid structure, and thick rubber soles make walking through snow a breeze.’
    2. 1.2 The part of the undersurface of a person's foot between the toes and the instep.
      • ‘But for me, this is the best part of the whole exercise, as firm fingers and thumbs work around the ankles, under the soles of the feet, between toes and over the instep.’
      • ‘The type of wound with the clearest indication for aggressive off-loading is a neuropathic wound on a weight-bearing area on the sole of the foot.’
      • ‘The heel is usually small and is internally rotated, making the soles of the feet face each other in cases of bilateral deformities.’
      • ‘Warts on the soles of the feet are called plantar warts.’
      • ‘The tibial nerve, located between the medial malleolus and Achilles tendon, supplies the medial portion of the sole and the medial side of the foot.’
      • ‘Massage the feet, each toe, the ankles, the heels and the soles in turn with the warm oil, gently stretching the feet and toes as you massage them and using circular motions around your ankles and heels.’
      • ‘Pain and numbness in the soles of the feet is a common presentation of sensory disturbance.’
      • ‘A 53 year old man presented with an ulcer on the sole of his left foot, attributed to a possible penetrating injury three months previously.’
      • ‘If the baby stops breathing, a nurse will stimulate the baby to start breathing by patting him or touching the soles of his feet.’
      • ‘It's a pump for bedridden patients that is designed to simulate the physiological pumping mechanism in the sole of the foot that is usually activated by weight bearing.’
      • ‘Warts are usually painless with the exception of the warts on the soles of the feet.’
      • ‘Use of padding techniques that arc glued or taped to the sole of the foot have also been reported in the medical literature.’
      • ‘Pain and numbness often radiate to the plantar heel and, in some cases, extend even to the distal sole and toes.’
      • ‘Scrub heels, soles and edges of your feet until they feel smooth.’
    3. 1.3 The undersurface of a tool or implement such as a plane or the head of a golf club.
      • ‘The soles on the 2-and 3-iron are a little wider to help me hit the ball higher.’
      • ‘Ted also pointed out that a plane with a rabbeted sole would not be suitable for cutting tenons for post and beam construction, as I suggested.’
      • ‘An iron bar of rectangular cross-section is mortised into the sole, to form the mouth front.’
      • ‘Allow the sole of the sand wedge to do what it is designed to do - slide under the ball and propel it out on a cushion of sand.’
      • ‘Morris' patent claims that the diamond grid pattern in the sole makes it easy to finish the sole of the plane with a file, implying they could be made by hand in a small shop.’
      • ‘To a club designer, draft is the angle that the clubhead makes (woods mostly) from the top of the toe to the toe edge of the sole.’
      • ‘This would solve the problem of cutting the front bevels, with its fence set at an acute angle to the plane sole and guided by the back of the molded strip.’
      • ‘The blades used by most tour players have narrow soles.’
      • ‘I need the sole of the sand wedge to help me slide through the grass and the loft to get it up.’
      • ‘The plane has an iron sole, but no screws are showing.’
      • ‘Flipping the clubhead can cause the leading edge to kick into the ball, especially with a sand wedge, because of the ‘bounce’ on its sole.’
      • ‘Paint on tees leaves lines on the sole of your driver.’
      • ‘We wanted to see if anything had changed, especially because typical golfers reading this package might start looking at the soles of their drivers with a bit more scrutiny.’
      • ‘Swing the long irons as though they all have the No.7 stamped on the sole.’
      • ‘This technique allows the sole of the club to contact the grass at impact and slide easily under the ball.’
      • ‘With a fairway wood, because of the way the sole is designed, you can hit slightly behind the ball and still produce a reasonable shot.’
      • ‘I've got lead tape on there to balance out the metal that was lost in grinding down the soles.’
      • ‘The top of a long putter should end about at the height of the logo on your golf shirt when you're in a slightly upright putting stance and the sole of the putter is resting flat on the ground.’
      • ‘I grind the soles to get the right shape and bounce angle.’
      • ‘A good clubfitter will have you hit shots off a lie board, which is a type of mat that will leave a mark on the sole to show how to adjust the lie if necessary.’
    4. 1.4 The floor of a ship's cabin or cockpit.
      • ‘Enough water can accumulate below that the cabin soles are immersed.’
      • ‘To their credit the builders have used bulkheads that are watertight between the hull and cabin soles to divide the boat into three separate compartments.’
      • ‘Unable to reach the spill, the boater was about to power saw an access hole in the cabin sole to reach the fuel.’
      • ‘Plywood bulkheads, seating and soles should be closely examined to ensure they remain in sound condition.’
      • ‘Jarred from their place by the impact when the boat struck, and papering the cabin sole with vital, unused information was a welter of neatly rolled charts which he trampled in his haste.’
      • ‘The cabin sole to deckhead height, at the aft end of the cabin, is less than four feet and there is sitting headroom over the bunks.’
      • ‘The hull is fitted with a structural fiberglass liner that incorporates the cabin sole as well as berth and furniture foundations.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]usually be soled
  • Put a new sole on to (a shoe)

    • ‘I had my favourite boots soled and heeled for half the price of a London cobbler.’
    • ‘A regular but infrequent 'chore' was taking boots and shoes to the cobbler to be soled and heeled.’
    • ‘One day a man was seen bringing a pair of shoes to the cobbler to be soled.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French, from Latin solea ‘sandal, sill’, from solum ‘bottom, pavement, sole’; compare with Dutch zool and German Sohle.

Pronunciation

sole

/sōl//soʊl/

Main definitions of sole in English

: sole1sole2sole3

sole2

noun

  • A marine flatfish of almost worldwide distribution, important as a food fish.

    See also Dover sole
    and See also lemon sole
    • ‘There's beef, duck and a vegetarian option, but the speciality is an interesting selection of fish dishes, including halibut, sole, monkfish, mussels and scallops.’
    • ‘At a fish-and-chip shop called the Balancing Eel, a stone's throw from the quayside, cod, haddock, plaice and sole are the fish of choice with scampi and prawn fritters close behind.’
    • ‘Have you tried to buy crabs, whiting, grey sole, ling or squid on the West Coast, where most of it comes in?’
    • ‘Further plans are in the pipeline for stocks including southern hake, sole, haddock and Norway lobster.’
    • ‘Thornback and blond rays are most often seen, with brill, plaice, sole, flounder and even turbot on occasion.’
    • ‘When ordering seafood, choose the leanest types, such as haddock, sole, trout, scallops, shrimp and crab.’
    • ‘If tilapia isn't available, substitute perch, sole, or other whitefish.’
    • ‘The main species harvested are hake, horse mackerel and pilchard, whilst other species such as monk, anchovy, tuna and sole also contribute to this sector.’
    • ‘One never wanted to eat anything but herrings; another ate only sole.’
    • ‘Cod, sole, haddock and ocean perch are decent choices because they are high in iodine but relatively low in mercury.’
    • ‘Among the fish on the move are commercially important varieties such as Atlantic cod, sole and whiting.’
    • ‘Cod, pike, sole, and salmon are all best with the honest citrus and potpourri quality of a Belgian style Pilsner.’
    • ‘The advice given is that there should be zero fishing for cod, whiting, haddock, plaice, sole and prawns in the Irish Sea.’
    • ‘The island has held the UK record for mullet, plaice and sole and been very close with bream and blonde rays so you can see why we started to visit the place.’
    • ‘These in turn provide fertile spawning grounds for crabs, shrimps, scallops, cod, plaice, bass, sole and herring, and so are vital to maintaining fisheries.’
    • ‘Other commonly eaten seafoods include sardines, salmon, sole, sea bass, and hake, as well as eel, squid, octopus, and lamprey.’
    • ‘Cooling atop a block of ice are exotic catches of sea bass, bluefish, salmon, sole, lobster and shark.’
    • ‘Feeling sorry for the sole, Valerie scooped a small opening at the base of the mesh through which it escaped.’
    • ‘Seafood with lower levels of methylmercury include cod, mahi-mahi, salmon, shrimp, trout, flounder, sole, perch and scallops.’
    • ‘Fish such as sole, halibut and cod, on the other hand, have relatively low omega - 3 concentrations.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French, from Provençal sola, from Latin solea (see sole), named from its shape.

Pronunciation

sole

/sōl//soʊl/

Main definitions of sole in English

: sole1sole2sole3

sole3

adjective

  • 1attributive One and only.

    ‘my sole aim was to contribute to the national team’
    • ‘The sole purpose of this particular effort is to identify undecided voters for follow-up contact.’
    • ‘‘Our sole purpose is the protection of nature,’ added Marinov.’
    • ‘A group has been formed with the sole aim of creating a community theatre in a building beside the river, below Kingston House.’
    • ‘Cath initially takes this job with the sole aim of being able to pay Bailey's medical bills.’
    • ‘Once you're sure your putter is aimed squarely, your sole thought during the stroke should be to maintain the triangle formed by your shoulders and arms.’
    • ‘World Heart Day is a global initiative with the sole aim of raising awareness about heart health and is being supported by the World Heart Federation.’
    • ‘It is here that an investigation by the director will occur with the sole purpose of collecting information that will lead to creating a harassment-free environment.’
    • ‘From then his sole aim is to restore his family's status and towards this end he starts new business ventures and succeeds.’
    • ‘The committee has been formed with the sole aim of organising the event, to which they hope to attract 5,000.’
    • ‘That sole voice belonged to the International Critical Incident Stress Foundation.’
    • ‘Fifteen-year-old James began race walking at 11 with the sole aim of representing his county in Mosney.’
    • ‘He was a father of four children and the sole breadwinner in the family.’
    • ‘Designated a protected area in 1941, the reserve was created with the sole aim of preserving the coastal sea and earth ecosystems.’
    • ‘When an identity becomes absolute, the little group to which I belong becomes my sole basis for self-understanding and the farthest boundary of my love.’
    • ‘He added that the City has indeed embarked upon several major projects over the last twelve months with the sole aim of uplifting the living standard of the residents.’
    • ‘But these days there are fewer customers and most are here for the sole purpose of eating and not for the casual drinks and supper anymore.’
    • ‘I couldn't possibly reveal the name of the sole person I haven't bothered to shop for yet, but it begins with L and has fewer than 5 letters.’
    • ‘And the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine says that caloric restriction is the sole instrument that produces weight loss.’
    • ‘A group of record companies named her as the sole defendant in a federal lawsuit, claiming she made more than 700 songs available for free on the Internet.’
    • ‘Carol is part of the London Laughter Club, a group which has the sole aim of making each other laugh.’
    only, one, one and only, single, solitary, lone, unique, only possible, individual, exclusive, singular
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Belonging or restricted to one person or group of people.
      ‘loans can be in sole or joint names’
      ‘the health club is for the sole use of our guests’
      • ‘Courts rarely grant sole custody or even joint physical custody to fathers, and standard visitation is just a few days a month.’
      • ‘I've been running it out of my home as a sole proprietor, using independent contractors.’
      • ‘Once published, the ideas in a book belonged to all - but the singular form of their expression remained the sole property of the author.’
      • ‘For a while, having a sole proprietorship raised your chances of getting audited.’
      • ‘Family members often find entering business together is more efficient than operating several independent sole proprietorships.’
      • ‘But it is important to note that there may be tax implications if any assets held in sole names are not transferred in the tax year the separation occurs.’
      • ‘But the issue of liability complicates the relative ease of setting up a sole proprietorship.’
      • ‘It all began because she had separated from her husband last October and he had moved out of the family home, and she had started claiming housing benefit and opened up a new council tax account in her sole name.’
      • ‘If her bid stands, Zeidler could become the sole proprietor of the hotel.’
      • ‘There are numerous business structures available, such as sole trader, limited and partnership, and the pros and cons of these need to be given due consideration.’
      • ‘My home is in my sole name and is valued at between €900,000 and €1.1m.’
      • ‘Chosen charities are given free stand space and joint sole rights to collect money from the 80,000 people who attend the show.’
      • ‘Throughout its history it has jealously guarded its sole power of initiative, so that it alone can initiate European legislation to come before the European Council and the European Parliament.’
      • ‘The sole proprietor is responsible for 100 % of all business debts and obligations.’
      • ‘In the UK on the other hand sole proprietorship and partnership were the only legal forms available to audit firms until 1991.’
      • ‘Like a sole proprietorship, it is relatively easy and inexpensive to set up.’
      • ‘Mrs Trusler had opened a bank account in her sole name to receive payments and the couple had made false statements on housing benefit and council tax benefit application and review forms.’
      • ‘Similarly, a divorced or separated parent who has sole physical custody of his children could reasonably be deemed the caretaker parent.’
      • ‘Land was attached to households and neither men nor women were sole legal owners of pieces of property.’
      • ‘Independent designer-retailers, sole traders in fashion and in other ethnic-designer goods began to rent retail space in the area.’
    2. 1.2archaic (especially of a woman) unmarried.
    3. 1.3archaic Alone; unaccompanied.

Origin

Late Middle English (also in the senses ‘secluded’ and ‘unrivaled’): from Old French soule, from Latin sola, feminine of solus ‘alone’.

Pronunciation

sole

/soʊl//sōl/