Definition of soldier of fortune in US English:

soldier of fortune

noun

  • A person who works as a soldier for any country or group that will pay them; a mercenary.

    • ‘Their principal commanders were Gustave-Paul Cluseret, a revolutionary soldier of fortune, and Louis Rossel, a young officer; they were aided by several former Polish and French army officers, notably Jaroslav Dombrowski.’
    • ‘These men were happy to pose for a photographer and to be identified as soldiers of fortune.’
    • ‘In the end, it is left to the reader to decide whether Constantine Phaulkon was a soldier of fortune, an opportunist, a brilliant strategist or someone who was stupid enough to become a martyr to a cause that was not his in the first place.’
    • ‘As soon as the goat created a passage into the hideout, the five soldiers of fortune stormed into the hovel, taking the guards by surprise.’
    • ‘Swiss soldier of fortune, Colonel Henry Bouquet, was en route from his headquarters in Philadelphia to relieve Fort Pitt during the time period in question.’
    • ‘Some, it is alleged, still now and then earn their bread as soldiers of fortune.’
    • ‘He had fought with the Abraham Lincoln Brigade during the Spanish civil war, later becoming a soldier of fortune.’
    • ‘Martin Guerre was a sixteenth-century French peasant who deserted his wife and family to become a soldier of fortune.’
    • ‘In 1855, North American soldiers of fortune led by William Walker tried to convert Central America into a United States colony.’
    • ‘Having incurred the jealousy of Alphonso, king of Castile, he was banished and became a soldier of fortune, fighting at times for the Christians, at others for the Moors.’
    • ‘Although soldiers of fortune, the A-Team often waived or reduced fees so that their services were within reach for those that needed them most.’
    • ‘Gregory's escapades as a soldier of fortune usually paid well, but the job was never constant.’
    • ‘He led his rapidly growing army of ruffians throughout China and soon assumed the throne, from soldier of fortune to emperor.’
    • ‘From the early 1360s to his death in 1394, this ruthless soldier of fortune cut a bloody swathe through the northern half of the peninsula, laying waste one city state after another.’
    • ‘Some might deride those who sign up as mercenaries, but these troops would have significantly different motives than the usual soldier of fortune.’
    • ‘One might expect a more enthusiastic response to Giuseppe Garibaldi, the dashing soldier of fortune who served as the lone true popular hero of the Risorgimento; and indeed, he enjoyed an enormous affection among the lower classes.’
    • ‘While the battle was small in terms of fatalities, the army lost several officers who would be badly missed, among them the dashing Major Gustavus von Tempsky, artist and soldier of fortune.’
    • ‘The mobile mercenaries of the fifth century had been veritable soldiers of fortune, for whom armed conflict was the only source of income.’
    • ‘Merchants, farmers, pioneers and soldiers of fortune were now on the move, many coming to the Tavern of the Night as their first stop to the open adventures that only providence knew.’
    • ‘Having lost heavily, Coppin was happy to surrender the field to William Saurin Lyster, an Irish soldier of fortune turned entrepreneur.’
    daredevil, seeker of adventures, hero, heroine, swashbuckler, knight errant, crusader, venturer, traveller, voyager, wanderer
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Pronunciation

soldier of fortune

/ˈsoʊldʒər əv/