Main definitions of solar in US English:

: solar1solar2

solar1

adjective

  • 1Relating to or determined by the sun.

    ‘solar radiation’
    • ‘By then solar science was thriving and astronomers began keeping daily logs of the number of spots on the Sun.’
    • ‘Most of the spots that did appear were located near the solar equator and scarcely lasted for more than one rotation of the Sun.’
    • ‘Some asteroids orbit at a solar distance where their year is matched to Jupiter's year.’
    • ‘At the Earth's surface, the atmosphere acts as an extra blanket to stop all but the most energetic of the solar and galactic radiation.’
    • ‘Meteorites represent a fossil record of the early conditions of the solar nebula.’
    • ‘The encounter also shortened the comet's solar orbit time from about 40 years to less than seven.’
    • ‘Sunspots and solar storms tend to occur in 11-year cycles; the current cycle peaked in late 2000.’
    • ‘Specific problems which Lexell studied in astronomy were his calculation of the solar parallax and his calculation of the orbits of several comets.’
    • ‘Algol comprises two large stars, one about three times the solar diameter, the other four times.’
    • ‘Until that day, solar astronomers will continue to watch the sun with trepidation, never knowing what might erupt next.’
    • ‘Mars has only the tiniest trace of a magnetic field, nothing like the huge bubble that surrounds the earth and protects us from solar and cosmic radiation.’
    • ‘Large solar disturbances heat Earth's upper atmosphere, causing it to expand.’
    • ‘These plasma flows transport, concentrate, and help spread out solar magnetic fields.’
    • ‘Collisions between energetic particles and the solar atmosphere also produce neutrons and gamma rays.’
    • ‘For the professional astronomers, the main subject of inquiry was the solar corona.’
    • ‘The bright star Sirius appeared again in the predawn sky, having been lost in the solar glare for a couple of months.’
    • ‘As they move around as the Sun spins, sunspots near the solar equator return to their starting point in about twenty-five days.’
    • ‘A large solar particle event can produce enough radiation to kill an unprotected astronaut.’
    • ‘Space is a hostile environment due to solar radiation, particle impacts and the intense cold of deep space.’
    • ‘Early theories about sunspots were many and various including that sunspots were clouds or sunspots were solar asteroids.’
    1. 1.1 Relating to or denoting energy derived from the sun's rays.
      ‘solar heating’
      • ‘They reflect the lithological and mineralogical variations of exposed rocks and soils by separating the solar reflected energy into six spectral bands.’
      • ‘The Northern Territory has plentiful resources of renewable energy, solar, wind, wave, tidal.’
      • ‘Fifteen sports will be catered for in a huge Olympic Park, where the Olympic village will be powered by solar and geothermal energy.’
      • ‘We have to popularise non-conventional energy such as solar and wind energy.’
      • ‘Our goal should be that half the buildings constructed in 2010 would require only solar heating or cooling systems.’
      • ‘Alternative energies such as solar, wind and sea power will generate a fair amount of energy but won't be enough on their own.’
      • ‘Any site having solar and electromagnetic energy is good for residence.’
      • ‘Passive solar heating is provided by black, water-filled tubes on the roof that mimic dinosaur capillaries.’
      • ‘It produces no carbon emissions, thanks to solar heating and clever design.’
      • ‘Ground-source heat pumps pull energy from solar heat stored in the surface layer of the ground.’
      • ‘The teacher says her tiny pupils have already become firm believers in ecological solar - generated energy.’
      • ‘It is believed that a minor perturbation in solar heating caused by orbital changes could lead to another ice age or warming period.’
      • ‘There are several sources of sustainable energy such as solar and wind power that is also eco-friendly.’
      • ‘There are few attempts to utilize solar and wind energy.’
      • ‘The Greens' policy of interest-free loans for solar heating in homes would cut energy demand and save people money, Mr Donald said.’
      • ‘All the classrooms incorporate energy-efficient lighting and passive solar heating.’
      • ‘This solar house manages considerable energy saving through passive means without excessive costs or gadgetry.’
      • ‘The zoo built a new enclosure for the otters last year, complete with waterfalls and solar heating to keep the correct temperatures.’
      • ‘Funding for research into renewable energy sources like solar, geothermal and biomass would also be trimmed.’
      • ‘Wind, solar and wave energy are being touted again as the cheap, clean fuels of the future.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin solaris, from sol ‘sun’.

Pronunciation

solar

/ˈsōlər//ˈsoʊlər/

Main definitions of solar in US English:

: solar1solar2

solar2

noun

British
  • An upper chamber in a medieval house.

    • ‘No one would have believed that she was the sort of woman who would rather be climbing the rigging on a ship than embroidering a pillow in the solar.’
    • ‘The lilting notes of Cein's flute filled the air as Edith sat amongst her ladies-in-waiting in her private solar.’
    • ‘Pray that the stairs are passable all the way to the solar.’
    • ‘Sighing, Valerian set down her needlework and followed the seven year old to the window of the solar.’
    • ‘I would hazard a guess that what he found were nail holes on part of the panelled screen commonly found in the better class of English medieval house between the hall and the solar.’

Origin

Middle English: from Anglo-Norman French soler, from Latin solarium ‘gallery, terrace’.

Pronunciation

solar

/ˈsōlər//ˈsoʊlər/