Definition of soft money in English:

soft money

noun

  • A contribution to a political party that is not accounted as going to a particular candidate, thus avoiding various legal limitations.

    • ‘The Democrats' platform advocates a ban on political contributions known as soft money.’
    • ‘The law bans soft money, unrestricted donations to political parties from corporations and other interest groups.’
    • ‘The Colorado majority sent a signal that it would uphold a ban or a limit on soft money - which is a limit on contributions into the party.’
    • ‘But I don't know that eliminating the so-called soft money or carpet money allows us to have a level playing field.’
    • ‘With McCain-Feingold, the campaign finance reform law, the national parties can no longer accept soft money.’
    • ‘Campaign finance reform means new rules on soft money, independent expenditures and political advertising.’
    • ‘But, I also see the dramatic increase in the so-called soft money, that is the unlimited contributions.’
    • ‘The law said that the national parties can't raise soft money.’
    • ‘I believe that both candidates should forego, forswear, soft money.’
    • ‘His idea of campaign finance reform is to ban soft money outright while removing all limits for personal contributions.’
    • ‘Ban soft money, limit what outside groups can contribute.’
    • ‘By the 2000 election both the Democratic and Republican parties raised and spent large amounts of soft money, each party raising close to a quarter of a million dollars.’
    • ‘That all gets corrupted when you have people floating around, giving the soft money and playing with both sides and that sort of thing.’
    • ‘Opponents claim that soft money raised by political parties is not related to federal elections.’
    • ‘A slim majority of candidates support outlawing soft money and nearly a majority support full public funding.’
    • ‘First of all, the contribution that I received was hard money, not soft money, every expert will tell you that.’
    • ‘We didn't have soft money, but we had ideas and we had vision and we had principles and we had things that attracted Americans to our banner.’
    • ‘It now appears that parties may resume raising and spending soft money, at least for get-out-the-vote purposes.’
    • ‘The parties will continue the trend towards more ideological sources as soft money is now off the table.’
    • ‘While national parties cannot take soft money, other entities set up by the national parties can.’