Definition of soft fruit in English:

soft fruit

noun

British
  • A small stoneless fruit, such as a strawberry or a black currant.

    • ‘The executive has also funded a post at Dundee University to develop national strategies to encourage people to eat soft fruits such as raspberries, strawberries and blackcurrants.’
    • ‘Bananas, berries and other soft fruits that don't juice well can be whirled into nutrient-rich smoothies.’
    • ‘A total of 170 commercial growers are involved in strawberries and other soft fruit, with a total of 2,500 acres in 1999.’
    • ‘The juices of the soft fruit were already running down Juktis's arms as she devoured the new sweet delicacy.’
    • ‘We are also blessed with local growers who provide all our salad leaves, edible petals, herbs and a wide selection of soft fruit and vegetables.’
    • ‘Of the soft fruits, gooseberries and redcurrants can be left as a bush or grown as a standard.’
    • ‘My local farm shop makes terrific ice-cream from its soft fruits, using little but cream and sugar.’
    • ‘Bruising is a problem for all soft fruits, and we continue to develop new peaches that can withstand the amount of handling necessary to bring them to market.’
    • ‘While most reptiles and amphibians have diets consisting of insects and other small creatures, iguanas are vegetarians, eating leaves, flowers and some soft fruits.’
    • ‘The arrival in 1849 of the North Kent railway line meant that perishable produce such as soft fruits could be transported to the London markets a great deal more quickly.’
    • ‘You may want to avoid using kitchen foil to wrap acidic foods such as tomatoes and soft fruits because aluminium in the foil can affect their taste.’
    • ‘In a few weeks the soft fruit which includes raspberries, redcurrants, gooseberries and blackcurrants will be available and the strawberries are already ripening and are ready to enjoy.’
    • ‘Blackberries are a popular soft fruit and a cheap source of vitamins.’
    • ‘Half of the area will be planted with soft fruit - gooseberries, raspberries and strawberries.’
    • ‘I get all my soft fruit from Wester Hardmuir Fruit Farm, just about three or so miles along the road from Nairn.’
    • ‘I have been a farmer all my life, but in the past 15 years we have diversified into soft fruits.’
    • ‘One of the drawbacks, if one can call it that, of growing your own soft fruit is that before you know it the next season's harvest is almost upon you while bags full of blackcurrants and berries sit uneaten in the freezer.’
    • ‘Whether you are fortunate enough to have a garden bursting with ripening soft fruits, berries and currants, or whether you buy them at the shops, this is the time to indulge.’
    • ‘Live yoghurt, sweetened soya milk and soft fruit, such as strawberries or raspberries, make a popular drink for kids, especially if served in an interesting glass with a straw.’
    • ‘Berries and other soft fruits are particularly rich in vitamins C and E and also in valuable flavonoids including anthocyanins, which also give the red colour and the tangy taste.’

Pronunciation

soft fruit

/ˌsɔft ˈfrut//ˌsôft ˈfro͞ot/