Main definitions of sod in English

: sod1sod2

sod1

noun

the sod
  • 1The surface of the ground, with the grass growing on it.

    • ‘Such are the quality of modern day pitches like Hyde Park, a couple of rain-free hours could help turn a water-logged sod into a playable surface.’
    • ‘The installation of the ProGrass playing surface begins with the removal of the natural grass and sod on the field.’
    • ‘A dense sod of the drop-seed grass, Sporobolus flexuosus, characterizes this area.’
    • ‘The seeds are also spread by way of composted manure, grass seed, sod, or hay, as well as by deer and other wildlife.’
    • ‘Next, he removed the sod and soil and added a thin layer of gravel.’
    • ‘I chunked my stuff on the sod and lay down next to it.’
    • ‘Despite the horrific rain of the previous two days the Timahoe sod provided a perfect surface which contributed to make this game so enjoyable.’
    • ‘Isabella felt like a chunk of sod when an earthworm burrows into it.’
    • ‘Remove existing lawn by slicing under the sod with a spade and cutting it into manageable pieces.’
    • ‘Removing the sod creates a recess in the soil, resulting in poor drainage.’
    • ‘Put plastic runners on both sides of the trench to avoid damage to your lawn, one runner for the sod and the other runner for the dirt.’
    • ‘Fans are trying to pull down the goal posts or tear a piece of history from the Ohio Stadium sod, and cops are shooting pepper spray at anything that moves.’
    • ‘If you choose to plant your crowns in your lawn, you'll have to remove the sod with a garden shovel.’
    • ‘After removing the sod, till the area and break up the compacted soil.’
    • ‘Look for 1,480 trees, 87,000 shrubs and sod to cover the equivalent of seven football fields.’
    • ‘Without the seasonal harvesting, plowing and planting, a mature sod of grasses and clovers would cover the earth and enable the soil to hold moisture better.’
    • ‘Gravity, spatial distance, trees across the road and large rocks under the sod all tell me, in effect, that I cannot have what I want, or at least that I cannot have it without struggle or a lapse of time.’
    • ‘Rake and mow the lawn if it needs it, and be sure to check for cranefly larvae under the sod if you noticed large mosquito-looking critters randomly flying about last fall.’
    • ‘The eggs are laid one or more inches below the soil surface in sod or patches of grassy weeds in cropland areas.’
    • ‘Heavy grazing the previous fall is essential to weaken and open up the sod when tillage or chemical control of the sod are not used.’
    turf, greenery, green
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A piece of this, usually sold in rolls and used to start a new lawn, athletic field, etc.
      • ‘The greens were constructed out of a topsoil mix and they used only four truckloads of sod to lay one strip around all greens and some of the bunkers.’
      • ‘For extreme cases you can line the yard with chicken wire and put a layer of sod over that.’
      • ‘In 1966, Luke used a silver spade to turn the first sod.’
      • ‘They cut out the portion where the sod would grow and outlined the shape with bender-board.’
      • ‘Cut one or more lengths of sod, as needed, and lay it in place.’
      • ‘Start laying your sod along walkways, sidewalks and driveways near your house.’
      • ‘Then either seed, plant new plugs, or insert a fresh piece of sod cut to fit the damaged area.’
      • ‘They then patched the back of the green with sod from their on-site nursery.’
      • ‘Even though it was still only late February some buds were already poking through the brown earth and the lawn looked as if it had just been laid from sod.’
      • ‘You can make an instant lawn of buffalo grass using sod, or for a fraction of the cost and a couple months of establishment time, use seed.’
      • ‘The green contours are also lay-of-the-land and the bunkers are hand-dug, some edged by tall layers of stacked sod, others by shaggy tufts of native grass.’
      • ‘If your lawn is bluegrass, if your lawn was started from sod, or if you use chemical fertilizer, you almost certainly have a thick build-up of thatch.’
      • ‘Oliver Clery, turned the first sod for the project on Tuesday of this week.’
      • ‘Willie knows the techniques; how you balance the sod, break the sod and so on.’
      • ‘Make sure that the sod you are having installed contains varieties of grass that are indigenous to your region.’
      • ‘Most Greenlandic homes are constructed of stone, sod, or wood.’
      • ‘Visitors were also invited to turn a sod of turf.’
      • ‘Remove dead patches along with 3 to 4 inches of soil underneath; fill the hole with a fresh piece of sod, as shown above, or overseed.’
      • ‘Painstaking effort goes into matching the seams between the strips of sod and the adjoining turf.’
      • ‘This isn't a problem when installing a new green, as the spores can be tilled into the soil prior to seeding or can be applied to the surface before rolling out carpet sod.’

verb

[with object]rare
  • Cover with sod or pieces of turf.

    ‘the stadium has been sodded’
    • ‘After construction was completed, we installed the remaining plants and sodded the lawn.’
    • ‘We planted and sodded the lawn and installed an irrigation system throughout.’

Phrases

  • under the sod

    • Dead and buried in a grave.

      • ‘On April 10, 1943, Lees-Milne wrote, ‘I would like this diary to entertain two or three generations ahead when I am under the sod.’’
      • ‘Time will run to seed when we are under the sod; there'll be time enough and to spare then.’
      • ‘He has property enough to make us independent but that will be valuable only, when we are under the Sod.’
      dead, expired, departed, gone, no more, passed on, passed away
      View synonyms
  • the old sod

    • One's native country.

      • ‘Dominic, who has lived in Canada and the USA for 50 years, is thinking of coming home to the old sod and I hope he settles in nicely.’
      • ‘The program will feature the Scots-Irish influences in the sessions that might have been played by the men themselves on the bagpipes, recorders and fiddles that had accompanied them from the old sod.’
      • ‘I'll be back on the old sod of Siberia, soaking up my cultural heritage, looking longingly at the land, and wondering why my old Auntie left in the first place.’
      • ‘Anyone who has the occasion, who has Irish lineage and returns to the old sod, as they say, is pleasantly surprised by the welcome.’
      • ‘A nice greeting to them as they take in the old sod again.’
      • ‘When asked what lured him to Ireland, Peterson jokes that it was a coming home of sorts, with his great-great-grandparents on his mother's side hailing from the old sod.’
      • ‘Shay Mulligan, played by Joseph M. Kelly, would appear to be the wise one of the group but, as the wake continues, it seems that he too is disillusioned and unable to return to the old sod like Jap and Git are planning.’
      • ‘Irish residents would be encouraged to write to relatives overseas ‘about the old sod,’ inviting them to visit Ireland.’
      • ‘There is a growing interest with people who once were residents of Tubbercurry, but now reside in England or America, to keep close contact with the old sod by way of the Internet and the local press is one such source of information for them.’
      • ‘When Brian Kerr announces his squad tomorrow for the friendly against Croatia on November 16 there will be some anxious glances from those opposed to the greening of players with flimsy ties to the old sod.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Middle Dutch, Middle Low German sode, of unknown ultimate origin.

Pronunciation

sod

/säd//sɑd/

Main definitions of sod in English

: sod1sod2

sod2

noun

British
vulgar slang
  • 1An unpleasant or obnoxious person.

    scoundrel, villain, rogue, rascal, brute, animal, weasel, snake, monster, ogre, wretch, devil, good-for-nothing, reprobate, wrongdoer, evil-doer
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A person of a specified kind.
      human being, individual, man, woman, human, being, living soul, soul, mortal, creature, fellow
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    2. 1.2 Something that is difficult or causes problems.

verb

British
vulgar slang
  • 1with object , usually in imperative Used to express one's anger or annoyance at someone or something.

    1. 1.1sod offno object in imperative Go away.
      go away, depart, leave, take off, get out, get out of my sight
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    2. 1.2as adjective sodding Used as a general term of contempt.
      blasted, damn, flaming, precious, confounded, pestilential, rotten, wretched
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Phrases

  • sod all

    • vulgar slang Absolutely nothing.

      not a thing, not a single thing, not anything, nothing at all, nil, zero
      View synonyms

Origin

Early 19th century: abbreviation of sodomite.

Pronunciation

sod

/säd//sɑd/