Definition of so-and-so in English:



  • 1A person or thing whose name the speaker does not need to specify or does not know or remember.

    • ‘They have whispering campaigns without including so-and-so, making sure so-and-so knows about it.’
    • ‘Yeah, I remember when so-and-so left a dead fish in my locker.’
    • ‘So you have people saying, well, we have to trust these people because Lady so-and-so or Lord so-and-so have seen this thing.’
    • ‘It was a subject that everyone seemed to be talking about these days - who liked who, who was going to go out, who said that so-and-so liked so-and-so… but Greg had never asked me before and for some reason I was not sure how to answer.’
    • ‘I'm always a little suspicious of such claims… and not just because it seems quite possible for someone to take an old piece of clothing and claim that so-and-so wore it in such-and-such a film.’
    • ‘My name is so-and-so and I tried to kill myself by doing this!’
    • ‘I always find it so interesting to note how different personalities play together, and how one personality might find so-and-so a perfect match whilst another personality might find the same so-and-so intensely irritating!’
    • ‘Not surprisingly, given the litigious times in which we live, most writers turn coy when quizzed about whether so-and-so was the model for a character.’
    • ‘Do I have to remember so-and-so's phone number?’
    • ‘From there, it pretty much boils down to so-and-so begot so-and-so, with certain offspring taking the high road while others took the low.’
    • ‘I have also seen many names such as so-and-so real estate advisory company or management advisory company.’
    • ‘I want to know people that you can pick up the phone to, and say, ‘Do you remember so-and-so?’’
    • ‘Meanwhile so-and-so has to come to school, and do you think he doesn't know what people are saying behind his back?’
    • ‘I pouted and folded my arms again, energy sapped because a certain so-and-so decided to shoot down my enthusiasm.’
    1. 1.1informal A person who is disliked or is considered to have a particular characteristic, typically an unfavorable one.
      ‘nosy old so-and-so!’
      • ‘He used to be such a good sport, but now he's a grumpy old so-and-so.’
      • ‘People would call him a lucky so-and-so, but he had skill and application and he was very, very clever.’
      • ‘Are the world's leading recording companies a bunch of spoiled, ungrateful, money-grabbing so-and-sos or what?’
      • ‘But my table companions were disappointed when it came to dessert and they found that the trifle had been completely gobbled up by some greedy so-and-sos who were there earlier in the evening.’
      • ‘Well, what about their statement as they leave the building, saying that he had spoken softly and what a smart so-and-so he was.’
      • ‘Presumably that's because he knows all about being bossed around by a miserable old so-and-so that everyone wishes would retire.’
      • ‘There is the ever present, ‘Should I leave so-and-so because I think he's a son of a so-and-so?’’
      • ‘I appreciate that I've been a bit of a so-and-so, but you've made your point and I will try to be different.’
      • ‘It is unlikely that I would have phoned up for tickets if I wasn't a contrary so-and-so.’
      • ‘My current gardener is a lazy so-and-so and I'm sorely tempted to give him his marching orders.’
      • ‘But, being the conniving old so-and-so he is, he went one better.’
      • ‘Ask people what they think of politicians and most will reply that they are a bunch of lying, cheating, self-interested so-and-sos.’
      • ‘He knew I was a determined so-and-so, and he knew what buttons to press to get the best out of me.’
      • ‘He might be a groovy so-and-so who just happens to think you're hot.’
      • ‘And we thought, well, poor so-and-sos, they're in the same kind of muck as we are.’
      • ‘He's a tough so-and-so, and he'll figure out how to do it.’
      • ‘And dammit we don't need to do that to be well armed or be the baddest so-and-so in the valley.’
      • ‘You can imagine, then, how annoyed I am to find out that the so-and-sos have double-crossed me: the decent thing I thought they were doing was in fact an unspeakably sleazy trick that makes sense only as part of a cover-up.’
      • ‘But they're bright little so-and-sos, both of them, and he knows as well as she does that he will never be enough to make her happy.’
      • ‘When I see my team-mates in the bar after a game I sometimes wonder if they are saying it's about time that old so-and-so gave up.’



/ˈsō ən ˌsō/