Main definitions of snuff in English

: snuff1snuff2

snuff1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Extinguish (a candle)

    ‘a breeze snuffed out the candle’
    • ‘Quickly I snuffed my cigarette and put it in my pocket.’
    • ‘Finally, as if being snuffed out like a candle, the sun was gone.’
    • ‘The candles had been snuffed out since I'd last been awake and the door was shut.’
    • ‘Even when fire has been snuffed out, he reminds us, its presence lingers.’
    • ‘She closed the tinderbox, snuffing the flames, then settled back down where she was lying before.’
    • ‘And each time, they re-light the fuse right where they snuffed it out the last time.’
    • ‘Sure, the candle was snuffed out at one moment, but that could have been the wind.’
    • ‘The flames were snuffed immediately as she lost concentration.’
    • ‘Edgar then took the extinguisher nozzle and proceeded to discharge Halon into the aircraft fire door, snuffing out the burning fuel inside the engine bay of the vulnerable fighter.’
    • ‘My candle was snuffed out and I knew it would never relight again.’
    • ‘Mysteriously snuffed out candles, weird sensations and shivers down the spine may not be due to the presence of ghosts in haunted houses but to very low frequency sound that is inaudible to humans.’
    • ‘"Well, I better go," I said, snuffing the cigarette in the grass.’
    • ‘Unrelenting and pitiless in their quest for fun, they snuff out their torches and shout louder while walking upon the poor squire.’
    • ‘But he snuffed it sternly and rose, and the touch of color in his cheeks could easily have been put down to the cold wind outside the chapter house.’
    • ‘I noticed Heinrich, the only boy of them without a helmet, shoveling dirt onto the fire to snuff it out.’
    • ‘She dropped the remains of her cigarette on the ground and snuffed it out with the toe of her boot.’
    • ‘Then he swears some more, and snuffs a cigarette in the aisle.’
    • ‘‘Point well taken,’ Sage remarked, snuffing out his cigarette in the grass and turning around.’
    • ‘All the candles were snuffed out immediately and a strong smell of brimstone and myrrh filled the room.’
    • ‘Another of the king's sniveling nobles had noticed, however, that she slipped out of his house long after candles had been snuffed and fires extinguished.’
    extinguish, put out, douse, smother, choke, stamp out, blow out, quench, stub out, turn out, dampen, damp down
    extinguish, put out, douse, smother, choke, stamp out, blow out, quench, stub out, turn out, dampen, damp down
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1dated Trim the charred wick from (a candle)
    2. 1.2informal Kill or put an end to in an abrupt or sudden manner.
      ‘his life was snuffed out by a sniper's bullet’
    3. 1.3snuff itBritish informal Die.
      • ‘China is the only place on earth where women are snuffing it at a higher rate than men.’
      • ‘Tony was always getting stuff bought for him, just because his dad snuffed it on his motorbike.’
      • ‘Even if your name is Lazarus, you're going to snuff it one day - and dying is the one certain event for which you can plan ahead!’
      • ‘Well, she and Theo were like two peas in a pod until Theo's father snuffed it.’
      • ‘And, in keeping with the rites of spring, thousands of Humboldt squid are snuffing it on Newport Beach.’
      • ‘They'll buy a house, turn it into their own personal nursing home and when the last of them snuffs it, the nurses get the house.’
      • ‘I have always joked that I would love to do the same and snuff it on the mat.’
      • ‘Our original drummer jumped in front of a truck and snuffed it.’
      • ‘The family is in line for money left by Mother but not before the old boy upstairs snuffs it.’
      • ‘Even if you didn't snuff it in a couple of weeks, your liver certainly wouldn't be fine thirty years down the road.’
      • ‘If I were to snuff it now, not a soul would be the wiser for it.’
      • ‘There was clearly something at stake because several key, engaging characters snuffed it.’
      • ‘Conditions were so bad that even the invading mice had snuffed it… four of them were found dead under one of her long-lost armchairs.’
      • ‘Even after snuffing it, foreigners continue to be financially desirable.’
      • ‘It simply happened, and it's a shame that he had to snuff it, but we all do in the end I suppose.’
      • ‘All these ideas are unfortunately ultimately dependent on whoever is around me when I snuff it, however.’
      • ‘If she snuffs it, will normal television programmes be suspended and will there be a national Three Minute Silence?’
      • ‘He can't hold a bedside vigil until the boy either wakes up of snuffs it!’
      • ‘There were a lot of conversations about auntie or granny snuffing it so the kids could divvy up the profits from a sale.’
      • ‘Another piece features Rooney's grandfather, who says he is so happy to see his son starring for England that ‘I wouldn't care if I snuffed it after this.’’

noun

  • The charred part of a candle wick.

Origin

Late Middle English: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

snuff

/snəf/

Main definitions of snuff in English

: snuff1snuff2

snuff2

noun

  • Powdered tobacco that is sniffed up the nostril rather than smoked.

    ‘a pinch of snuff’
    • ‘Although bubble gum and candy are also packaged to resemble snuff, chewing tobacco, pipes, and cigars, we do not know if similar evidence exists for such products or in other countries.’
    • ‘A pinch of snuff may be placed between the cheek and the gum or inhaled into the nostrils.’
    • ‘On one occasion, he was walking inland up Deeside to fulfil an engagement, and stopped to take a pinch of snuff.’
    • ‘Tobacco and snuff were convenient and acceptable items, and more luxurious fare was provided when possible.’
    • ‘I do not drink or smoke but take snuff occasionally.’
    • ‘The history of chewing and smoking tobacco, and of taking snuff, is of great antiquity.’
    • ‘He had smoked since 1970 and had used oral snuff since 1980.’
    • ‘I would take my brown bag lunch down to Fish Creek behind the football field where I had smoked pot and done snuff back in my middle school.’
    • ‘All forms of tobacco have been implicated as causative agents, including cigarette, cigar and pipe tobacco as well as chewing tobacco and snuff.’
    • ‘A pinch of snuff, inhaled through the nose, used to be a common way of using tobacco.’
    • ‘Switching from cigarettes to a pipe or cigars, or using snuff or oral tobacco (chewing tobacco), does not reduce the risk.’
    • ‘With a single movement he sniffed up snuff from the back of his hand.’
    • ‘If pub owners really knew what they were at, they'd start selling snuff or some other kind of smokeless tobacco.’
    • ‘Occurrences of the disease have been reported, but uncommonly, in persons who use smokeless tobacco or snuff.’
    • ‘Get rid of all your chewing tobacco or snuff before your quit date.’
    • ‘Eating out every other day or habits like chewing betel leaves, tobacco, taking snuff, smoking, and drinking take their toll on one's health and voice.’
    • ‘Tobacco taken in the form of snuff contains mutagens that can cause nose tumors.’
    • ‘After a committee advised the government to ban oral snuff, the government acted in accordance with the recommendation.’
    • ‘Russians used to be sent to Siberia for taking snuff.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Inhale or sniff at (something)

    ‘they stood snuffing up the keen cold air’
    1. 1.1archaic [no object] Sniff up powdered tobacco.

Phrases

  • up to snuff

    • 1informal Meeting the required standard.

      ‘they need a million dollars to get their facilities up to snuff’
      • ‘Coverage has been adequate, but the return game isn't up to snuff.’
      • ‘Okay, so you're not up to snuff on the humble geoduck.’
      • ‘Our columnists are required to be up to snuff on everything and muster up opinions on a wide range of topics.’
      • ‘Besides, the competition in the AFC East isn't up to snuff.’
      • ‘Women's non-revenue producing programs tend to be saved as the number of women athletes competing brings the school involved up to snuff in the eyes of the law.’
      • ‘There are the occasional stories that on second/third/fourth look didn't hold up and I've very occasionally bought a story that I didn't think was up to snuff that I was pressured to buy for one reason or another.’
      • ‘More attention to detail - making sure his physique was evenly balanced and that weak points were brought up to snuff - was required.’
      • ‘So what we need to do is make sure that our health care system is up to snuff, so that if we do have that situation or any other kind of major infectious problem, we'll be able to handle it.’
      • ‘Okay, so maybe my time skills aren't all up to snuff.’
      • ‘He predicts it will have its intended effect simply because teams will be put at a competitive disadvantage if they aren't up to snuff.’
      adequate, competent, acceptable, satisfactory, reasonable, fair, decent, good enough, sufficiently good, not bad, all right, average, tolerable, passable, moderate, middling
      up to scratch, up to the mark, up to par
      ok, okay, so-so, fair-to-middling
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1In good health.
        ‘he hadn't felt up to snuff all summer’
    • 2informal Not easily deceived; knowing.

      ‘an up-to-snuff old vagabond’

Origin

Late Middle English (as a verb): from Middle Dutch snuffen to snuffle The noun dates from the late 17th century and is probably an abbreviation of Dutch snuftabak.

Pronunciation:

snuff

/snəf/