Definition of snort in English:

snort

noun

  • 1An explosive sound made by the sudden forcing of breath through one's nose, used to express indignation, derision, or incredulity.

    ‘he gave a snort of disgust’
    • ‘They're happy to point out our ignorance with snorts of contempt.’
    • ‘A few snorts came from the class but the vice-principal didn't seem to notice.’
    • ‘I was pulled out of my trance as she let out a derisive snort.’
    • ‘Angela stifled a snort as she and Sara examined my fluffy pink bunny slippers.’
    • ‘A slight snort came from the Japanese boy.’
    • ‘After blinking in surprise, Tyler recovers with a snort of disbelief.’
    • ‘I heard what sounded like a faint snort of disgust from Dad.’
    • ‘With a disgusted snort, Jack stormed out of the dining room.’
    • ‘On the other end of the line, I heard him suppress a snort.’
    • ‘A disbelieving snort escaped me and I shook him again.’
    • ‘Now it was my turn to make the snort of disbelief.’
    • ‘Her eyes came to rest back on her own partner, and she suppressed a snort.’
    • ‘To this I expect to hear snorts of derision.’
    • ‘Conner didn't even try to suppress the snort that erupted.’
    • ‘The acknowledgment was merely a snort and some derisive laughter.’
    • ‘They both burst out laughing and were doing so with so much energy and force that everyone came running in to see them just sitting there, holding there stomachs and gasping for breath between snorts and laughs.’
    • ‘An incredulous snort came from Chris, and I gave him dirty look that silenced him up.’
    • ‘His father had made a lot of disgusted snorts in response to it.’
    • ‘I muffled a snort into the back of my hand.’
    • ‘But instead, she had not even a disdainful snort to give.’
    1. 1.1 A snorting sound made by an animal, typically when excited or frightened.
      • ‘The closest thing I ever heard to the sound was a deer snort, but it wasn't the same.’
      • ‘Adam gave a soft whistle as he entered the barn and was pleased to hear an answering snort from Sport.’
      • ‘For a long time, all that could be heard were the snorts of the horses and the cattle's shouts from the darkness.’
      • ‘He made the trees, then turned to his left as he heard the snort of a horse.’
      • ‘It trembles even more, and gives a frightened snort.’
      • ‘Behind her, I hear a soft snort and look to see a second horse - this one a shaggy-coated white pony, a male.’
      • ‘The mare, having heard the same noise, gave a nervous snort, stamping her hooves anxiously.’
      • ‘The only sounds he heard were the crickets chirping, the manes and tails being swished about and the occasional grunts and snorts from the animals that occupy the stables.’
      • ‘There was an awkward silence where it was only broken by the horse's occasional snorts.’
      • ‘They are quiet animals but may exchange snorts, snarls, burps and grunts.’
      • ‘Just then, I heard the snort of a horse, and someone dismounting onto the gravel.’
      • ‘He could play for her any musical instrument, knew all music by heart, all birdsong, the purr, growl, snort, or whine of each and every animal.’
      • ‘Its snorts and whinnies were frantic; its eyes rolling white.’
      • ‘Her fears were put to rest though, when instead the white mare continued to pace up and down her now worn out stall floor, giving the occasional snort of what seemed to be frustration.’
      • ‘Neighs, whinnies, and snorts, along with the clip-clop of hooves as the horses tore through the camp, made it all but impossible to hear.’
      • ‘Parking my truck in the lane, I went through the gate and made it about half way across the pasture, thermal jump suit, deer rifle and all, when I heard a snort and the sound of hooves.’
    2. 1.2informal A quantity of an illegal drug, especially cocaine, inhaled in powdered form through the nose.
      ‘they were high on a few snorts’
      • ‘A single snort of cocaine triggers a week-long surge of activity in the brain's addiction centre, scientists said yesterday.’
      • ‘Maybe after a jigger of scotch and a snort of ecstasy, you'll be more inclined to eat and enjoy these pretzels.’
      • ‘Eddie starts every moment with two snorts up each nostril.’
    3. 1.3informal A measure of an alcoholic drink.
      ‘a bottle of rum was opened and they took a good long snort’
      • ‘Marvin lifts a bottle of vodka and takes several snorts without setting the camera down.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1Make a sudden sound through one's nose, especially to express indignation or derision.

    ‘she snorted with laughter’
    with direct speech ‘“How perfectly ridiculous!” he snorted’
    • ‘I snorted in amusement, and picked up the coffee mug I'd abandoned earlier.’
    • ‘One of the soldiers, a tall man with blonde hair, snorted derisively at her.’
    • ‘Drake snorted with laughter again as I hung up on him, feeling nervous.’
    • ‘Adam snorted derisively and stepped away and up the slope from Joe.’
    • ‘His best friend just snorted in reply but mumbled a thanks.’
    • ‘Isabelle scanned the letter, raised her eyebrows and passed it off to Ash, who snorted with laughter.’
    • ‘Snorting in annoyance, he dropped the thoughts from his mind.’
    • ‘The man gave him a snide look as he snorted in contempt.’
    • ‘The man snorted in disgust and superior amusement.’
    • ‘Derek snorted indignantly, and returned to his own amusements.’
    • ‘She snorts slightly with laughter, burying her head into Shane's neck, her eyebrows arched.’
    • ‘I snorted out loud, and then immediately realized what I'd done.’
    • ‘I just read one of his posts about smoking in the rain and I snorted out loud at work.’
    • ‘And the temptation here is to snort in derision and ask: not difficult enough?’
    • ‘I snorted derisively from my spot in the darkest corner of the large room.’
    • ‘She snorted in disbelief when she noticed his books were even in alphabetical order.’
    • ‘He stared at her, then curled his lip upward and snorted derisively.’
    • ‘The camera rocked as Daisy first snorted then burst with laughter.’
    • ‘Lydia snorted in derision and yanked her arm out of his grasp.’
    • ‘I stared at her, then snorted with laughter.’
    1. 1.1 (of an animal) make a sudden explosive sound through the nose, especially when excited or frightened.
      • ‘The dark grey stallion snorted in reply and picked up speed, galloping through the lush, wet morning grass onwards away from the camp.’
      • ‘The beast snorted angrily at the cloaked men, and Tim had a hard job of keeping it from lunging.’
      • ‘Isaac pulled on the leather reins and the dappled horse snorted and came to a halt.’
      • ‘The mare snorted and pawed the ground, wanting to run again.’
      • ‘The beast snorted irritably and kicked its hooves through the unfortunate goblin's abdomen.’
      • ‘The great beast snorted again and shook her head.’
      • ‘She froze in her sleeping bag as a very large creature snorted outside the tent.’
      • ‘The horse snorted as she looked at her prey and waited for praise.’
      • ‘The Unicorn snorted loudly and pawed the ground, throwing up clods of dirt and grass.’
      • ‘A white horse snorted loudly as it disappeared around a corner.’
      • ‘A few frazzled minutes later, Val was mounting up, the grey mare snorting, but keeping a curious eye on her surroundings, as though she couldn't believe she was finally outside.’
      • ‘His mare was already snorting at being held from the wrong side.’
      • ‘The mare snorted again and then took off into the trees, a beacon of pearly white in the gray.’
      • ‘The excitement is palpable as we queue up, as is the strong scent of ammonia from the horses and bulls snorting eagerly in the paddocks.’
      • ‘The large mammal snorted, as a voice spoke suddenly from atop the beast.’
      • ‘The stallion snorted and continued to paw, but as she stared, he slowed, then stopped.’
      • ‘As his horse snorted at the many figures surrounding them the hunter realized there were too few people there.’
      • ‘The beasts snorted in their annoyance, looking at her with huge eyes and shifting a bit.’
      • ‘The snow tiger snorted, growled, and then opened his eyes to a world of purple.’
    2. 1.2informal with object Inhale (the powdered form of an illegal drug, especially cocaine) through the nose.
      • ‘Just think of the people that would roll them up and snort drugs with a $20 bill.’
      • ‘A camera whirls around a hedonistic fancy dress party where people snort drugs off heaving bosoms.’
      • ‘Losing his battle with sobriety, the fictional Ellis drinks vodka like a fish and snorts cocaine.’
      • ‘Five days earlier, the patient had similarly become breathless after snorting heroin, but she improved after inhaling albuterol and did not seek medical care.’
      • ‘He was hopelessly addicted to coffee, cigarettes, and other drugs: he would snort heroin and then pray for the courage to resist its temptation.’
      • ‘He said those who snorted the drug often suffered nosebleeds because blood vessels in the nostrils were inflamed by the powder.’
      • ‘He snorted the drug or smoked crack cocaine three to five times a week.’
      • ‘She then returns home to yell at her Ecuadorian nanny, ignore her kids and snort hard drugs until she falls asleep and has to do it all over again.’
      • ‘He just snorted too much cocaine, and things got out of hand.’
      • ‘Everyone is sucked in and sells out and snorts coke.’
      • ‘He'd seen him the other day snorting cocaine or some other drug in an alley on his way back from school.’
      • ‘I was so naive that I didn't know you could snort heroin.’
      • ‘Christine reverts back to her old habits - snorting cocaine and popping pills - in an effort to assuage her horrible tragedy.’
      • ‘If your performance is being impaired by snorting cocaine or drinking too much you could be subject to disciplinary procedures anyway.’
      • ‘She realized how absurd it was to be pleased someone was complimenting the way she snorted drugs, but it didn't stop the glow that she felt.’
      • ‘I think that's a large part of the reason he snorts coke.’
      • ‘For some reason I think maybe he was snorting heroin.’
      • ‘Did anyone think that rather than snort coke she would sip cocoa?’
      • ‘If it gets out that she snorts cocaine, teenage girls will think it's cool to snort cocaine.’
      • ‘I became an alcoholic and began to deal in drugs, even snorting cocaine and crack.’

Origin

Late Middle English (as a verb, also in the sense ‘snore’): probably imitative; compare with snore. The noun dates from the early 19th century.

Pronunciation

snort

/snôrt//snɔrt/