Main definitions of snook in English

: snook1snook2

snook1

noun

  • A large edible game fish of the Caribbean which is sometimes found in brackish water.

    • ‘Crucial traits all, when your reel is screeching and a 20-pound snook is towing your skiff into deep water.’
    • ‘Any anchorage with a mangrove shoreline is likely to produce mangrove snapper and, if you are in the Greater Antilles or along the South American coast, snook.’
    • ‘On calmer mornings, walking the beach and casting diagonally across the surf line can produce a mixed bag of trout, reds, jacks, snook and mackerel.’
    • ‘Small snook were caught from Freeport's Surfside Jetty.’
    • ‘Perhaps they could be made to live on wartime rations tins of snook, dried eggs, carrot pudding until they return to normal size, and are ready to rejoin the rest of us again.’
    • ‘But once out there, it's not unusual to see spotted rays or even nurse sharks cruising along a 2,000-foot wall, or for anglers to hook bonefish, tarpon, or snook.’
    • ‘The saltwater river harbors prized snook, trout, largemouth bass, redfish, and even tarpon.’
    • ‘Redfish, snook, cobia and ladyfish are the main targets at this time of the year and we also took a couple of plaice and ‘sea-trout’.’
    • ‘Perhaps it had just polished off a fat snapper or snook and had no appetite for a couple of scrawny teenagers.’
    • ‘I also planned to fish the Indian / Banana river and Mosquito lagoon for redfish, snook, sea trout and ladyfish.’
    • ‘It's a fast growing branch of angling today and I suppose it can be likened to fishing for redfish, snook or tarpon except it's done in freshwater.’
    • ‘At least two snook, one of which was within the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department's 24-to 28-inch legal slot length, were caught this past summer from the Surfside jetty.’
    • ‘She is a serious angler, the holder of a record 49-pound snook, and understands the priorities at Parismina.’
    • ‘Yeah, problem was, there literally wasn't anybody to paddle out with, and I could see all the mullet, and the snook, tarpon and sharks feeding on them out there.’
    • ‘Big pods of roosterfish and Jacks, joined by snook from the lagoons where the crocodiles live, all join forces to slay the vast schools of anchovies which gather here at this time.’
    • ‘We would spend a few days in Maryland then take a flight down to Titusville on the east coast of Florida where we would fish for snook, redfish, sea trout and perhaps get the chance of catching some cobia.’
    • ‘Huge schools of black and silver mullet migrate southwards along the coast in the autumn, almost always within casting distance, accompanied by an army of predators including tarpon, sharks, jacks, barracudas and snook.’
    • ‘On slack tide just off the mouth of Florida's Indian River, for example, even live threadfins on 6 feet of fluorocarbon leader sometimes cannot get a snook's attention.’

Origin

Late 17th century: from Dutch snoek (see snoek).

Pronunciation

snook

/sno͝ok//snʊk/

Main definitions of snook in English

: snook1snook2

snook2

noun

in phrase cock a snook
British
informal
  • 1Place one's hand so that the thumb touches one's nose and the fingers are spread out, in order to express contempt.

    ‘you wouldn't be so quick to cock a snook if she were actually looking at you’
    1. 1.1 Openly show contempt or a lack of respect for someone or something; thumb one's nose.
      ‘he spent a lifetime cocking a snook at the art world’
      • ‘And the newcomers, conscious of the part the Americans played in their escape from the Soviet bloc, have no desire to cock a snook at Washington.’
      • ‘Having lived his prime years a free man, when he should have been in custody, and cocking a snook at the British criminal justice system at every opportunity, I have no sympathy for him whatsoever.’
      • ‘One thing is certain - the man can't continue failing fully to comply with UN resolutions and cocking a snook at the international community.’
      • ‘Sadly for other road users he is not the only driver who thinks he can cock a snook at the law.’
      • ‘It just means that he cocks a snook at it and gets no further penalty for it.’
      • ‘Rather than making money, criminals may simply want to display their prowess - cocking a snook at the establishment and earning the respect of their peers in the underworld.’
      • ‘He cocked a snook at the special task force of both the states.’
      • ‘Root up hedges, build a settlement off a derestricted road, flout all sorts of regulations and cock a snook at authority.’
      • ‘He added: ‘It really is cocking a snook at authority.’’
      • ‘He said some people were cocking a snook at the criminal justices system while others had no confidence in it because they saw criminals appearing to escape punishment.’
      • ‘A third of churchgoers in their early 20s and 30s say they would be happy ‘living in sin’ before marriage - thus cocking a snook at traditional biblical teaching - according to new research.’
      • ‘The south is mobilising Italy's top division and enjoying cocking a snook at the game's governors.’
      • ‘It has cocked a snook at Europe and won the necessary domestic plaudits.’
      • ‘It does not mind cocking a snook at conventional codes in the process.’
      • ‘They are cocking a snook at the council and just open the floodgates for similar situations.’
      • ‘The Pavilion's design is more window-dressing than architecture; its furniture is not gentlemanly; its decoration cocks a snook at good taste.’
      • ‘He was a bit of a maverick who was inclined to cock a snook at authority.’
      • ‘Football has always cocked a snook at the laws of economics.’
      • ‘Sadly, while cocking a snook at the health police is irresistible, the effects on the figure are likely to be anything but.’
      • ‘Proper in his manner, he was still not beyond cocking a snook at authority.’

Origin

Late 18th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

snook

/sno͝ok//snʊk/