Definition of snob in English:

snob

noun

  • 1A person with an exaggerated respect for high social position or wealth who seeks to associate with social superiors and dislikes people or activities regarded as lower-class.

    • ‘She's a rich snob who thinks she can get whoever and whatever she wants.’
    • ‘Why should she care if it was governed by arrogant snobs like Veronica?’
    • ‘People who were not snobs, and would have been shocked to be described as such, nonetheless took a quiet satisfaction from the romance of two old and grand families coming together.’
    • ‘The most common criticism is that they are snobs who criticise ordinary members of the public about their clothes and humiliate them on television.’
    • ‘She was a stuck up little snob who thought the world revolved around her.’
    • ‘It points out how primitively produced goods are preferred by snobs because they are different and more expensive rather than because they are better in any way.’
    • ‘Where do you get off calling my friends snobs?’
    • ‘My mother had drilled it into me that they were snobs.’
    • ‘They were all rich snobs that thought people like myself lower than dirt.’
    • ‘He's a snob, a social climber and a misogynist, really a very unpleasant man.’
    • ‘The nice thing about your mother is that she doesn't really care what you do, ideally, because some mothers are snobs, and that causes great problems.’
    • ‘He was from Barker, she learnt, forced to go to the private school much like she was, sharing her hatred for the snobs of their area.’
    • ‘He suffered neither fools nor snobs gladly and lost millions creating prototypes of aeroplanes that other companies would benefit from afterwards.’
    • ‘It's a lot easier to believe someone is a selfish snob when they aren't so self sacrificial to their friends.’
    • ‘We called them stuck-up snobs, and they called us lowdown hicks.’
    • ‘I run a business, if it flops I'm accountable and suffer the consequences, so why not have the same rule for the snobs who run the biggest companies?’
    • ‘She was mercilessly teased by boys and other girls about her physical appearance and called a snob because her father was wealthy.’
    • ‘She has come to realizations that no other popular snob has ever come to before.’
    • ‘She was considered by most to be a quiet, stuck-up snob.’
    • ‘I think they are snobs and do not want to be associated with Swindon.’
    1. 1.1with adjective or noun modifier A person who believes that their tastes in a particular area are superior to those of other people.
      ‘a musical snob’
      • ‘But I'd argue that among rock snobs of all ages, quiet is the new loud.’
      • ‘A common complaint issued by food snobs is that supermarket fruit and veggies is all standardised - the stores won't stock lopsided peppers or mean-looking garlic, and it is all a bit chilled and insipid.’
      • ‘Now the travel snob is not a new phenomenon, he has been around for years.’
      • ‘In short, I really became quite the superior rock snob.’
      • ‘I'm going to write about comic book snobs later.’
      • ‘What is it with music snobs only being able to appreciate good throwaway pop ten years later?’
      • ‘Broadsheet snobs can dismiss me all they like, but I'm selling papers and they're not.’
      • ‘When the people who get ‘celebrated’ are chefs, models, celebrity real estate agents and wine snobs, we're in trouble.’
      • ‘How many food snobs would still be raving about white truffles if they were ubiquitous?’
      • ‘But food snobs have some more tricks up their sleeves.’
      • ‘There have always been classical and opera snobs who look down on the inferior world of pop and rock.’
      • ‘Unfortunately you've had it: you are in the company of a travel snob.’
      • ‘They plug into portable devices and laptops, and will impress even insufferable music snobs.’
      • ‘The range of drinks available, and the local approach to them, makes Italy the most sophisticated drinking culture in Europe, and there are hardly any wine snobs.’
      • ‘These kiddies are young and you won't be finding too much to appeal to the music snobs, but that there's some potential.’
      • ‘There is obvious pleasure in exposing wine snobs, even more than Literature snobs.’
      • ‘Like geeky music snobs sneering as their favourite indie band climbs the charts, they view success as a sign of impurity, popularity as poison.’

Origin

Late 18th century (originally dialect in the sense ‘cobbler’): of unknown origin; early senses conveyed a notion of ‘lower status or rank’, later denoting a person seeking to imitate those of superior social standing or wealth. Folk etymology connects the word with Latin sine nobilitate ‘without nobility’ but the first recorded sense has no connection with this.

Pronunciation

snob

/snäb//snɑb/