Main definitions of smack in English

: smack1smack2smack3smack4smack5

smack1

noun

  • 1A sharp slap or blow, typically one given with the palm of the hand.

    ‘she gave Mark a smack across the face’
    • ‘She was snapped out of her wandering daze as Meghan gave her a sharp smack to the back of the head.’
    • ‘With a little force and a good aim, she succeeded in squishing the scream - inspiring creature with a sharp smack.’
    • ‘It was like getting two smacks with a single slap across the face, the first one was the physical slap and the second was the emotional one.’
    • ‘Lydia tried to stop him and was rewarded with a sharp smack to the leg.’
    • ‘First I realised that there are situations in which a smack on the bottom or a slap on the fingers was the only way to get a message across.’
    • ‘He caught her with ease and gave her a sharp smack on her rump.’
    • ‘I heard a thump and repetitive smacks and screams.’
    • ‘She pushed her way from the table and passed her previous customer, who gave her a sharp smack on the rear as she passed.’
    • ‘He got a smack in the head and a smack in the throat so he won't practise today.’
    • ‘‘Man, you're easier than I thought,’ he snickered, earning him a sharp smack on the head with another pillow.’
    • ‘I agree, back then, even when I was a kid, it was seen as the norm to discipline children with a smack or a belt with a stick, but yet they didn't grow up to be muggers or binge drinking fighters.’
    • ‘Smack after smack, punch after punch, slap after slap; it was all heard.’
    • ‘With one farmer acting as go-between, eventually you would hear the smack of spittle-wetted palms signifying a satisfactory result all round.’
    • ‘This got him a light smack on the head from Anna's palm.’
    • ‘Melanie's hand slapped the table with a smack, and she, too, got hold of one.’
    • ‘He straightened in surprise and was met with a sharp smack from the small girl before him.’
    • ‘Bully boys kowtow to only two things: a large smack or abject ridicule.’
    • ‘David walked up and coolly punched the man smack in his mouth.’
    • ‘He wasted no time in raining down a series of sharp smacks to his target.’
    • ‘Well now, I don't like to sound judgmental but, if any of them turned up on the doorstep asking if my daughter wanted to come out to play, I'd send them packing with a smack over the ear.’
    slap, blow, spank, cuff, clout, thump, punch, rap, swat, thwack, crack
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A loud, sharp sound made by a slap or similar action.
      ‘she closed the ledger with a smack’
      • ‘There was a smack, then the sound of a door closing and locking.’
      • ‘Mychael spun around, her hand connecting with Caleb's face with a loud smack.’
      • ‘After Amber's palm made contact with Jackie's face, sounding off a loud smack through the area, Jackie fell to the ground from the force.’
      • ‘They hurried along, the smack of their feet the only sound that echoed in the dank cavern.’
      • ‘Throwing his sheets back, he swung his legs over the side of his bed, his feet hitting his hard wood floor with a loud smack.’
      • ‘After a few second, he heard a resounding smack and a thud as Valshar obviously hit the wall.’
      • ‘Sadly it was soon followed by a whistle as the sword cut through the air, which prompted a loud smack as it hit its target and a groan.’
      • ‘I heard a very loud smack and my eyes went directly to the front of the room.’
      • ‘Properly done, you will spill you drink, face-plant and make a loud smack when you hit.’
      • ‘He tries the pipe out and ends up flying out and landing with a great loud smack.’
      • ‘The bodies hit the cemented pavement with a loud smack and they begin to roll across the floor.’
      • ‘When the teen reached the doorstep to the house, she heard a loud smack, and a child crying.’
      • ‘There was a loud smack, and one of the shelves detached and plenty of magazines spilled onto the floor.’
      • ‘Just then, Kat's hand made contact with that stupid grin with a loud smack that made the whole hallway pay attention.’
      • ‘A loud smack of something hard meeting with something soft was heard before Trinity spoke up.’
      • ‘Her hand flew up and a loud smack was heard throughout the large room before Nora knew what she was doing.’
      • ‘Suddenly he dropped me without warning and I hit the ground with a loud smack.’
      • ‘A loud smack was heard and the sound of flesh on flesh reverberated in the now silent gym.’
      • ‘My landing was uneventful, which is to say there wasn't a loud smack on the wall at the bottom of the stairs.’
      • ‘Rosa smiled and tossed Alli aside; she hit a tree with a loud smack.’
      bang, crash, thud, thump, wham
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 A loud kiss.
      ‘I was saluted with two hearty smacks on my cheeks’
      • ‘I slowly exhaled and lifted my soles off the ground and planted a light kiss on Dexter's lips, not a smack.’
      • ‘Partly because his kiss was a solid one, not a smack or whatever other types they are, also because this was Kenny!’
      • ‘He smiled at me, took my cheeks in his hands, and kissed my forehead with an over-dramatic smack.’
      • ‘She kissed the scratch on my forehead with a loud, wet smack and then hurled herself onto Rafe's twitching lips.’
      • ‘I heard a bunch of sucking noises, smacks, and giggles below.’
      • ‘He winced when Kala delivered a loud smack to her father's cheek.’
      • ‘I leaned in and gave her a quick smack on the cheek as she shoved me away.’
      • ‘They started groping viciously and kissing savagely with loud, desperate smacks resonating into the dizzy evening air.’
      kiss, peck
      View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Strike (someone or something), typically with the palm of the hand and as a punishment.

    ‘Jessica smacked his face quite hard’
    • ‘‘When a parent smacks a child, they are to some extent losing control,’ said Lord Lester.’
    • ‘You smack your forehead as punishment for saying that.’
    • ‘If I ever did something like that, my mother would have smacked me into next week.’
    • ‘We all sat and watched an out-of-control mother repeatedly smack her toddler at a major shopping centre this afternoon.’
    • ‘I never smacked him or chastised him or punished him.’
    • ‘Brandon sped down the highway, smacking the steering wheel with the palm of his hand.’
    • ‘Suppose you're a believer in not smacking children to discipline them.’
    • ‘I remember my mother smacking me because when a little cousin was staying with us I talked to him when he was in the lavatory.’
    • ‘‘We don't even believe in smacking the kids,’ she said.’
    • ‘At primary school we had an elderly teacher who smacked us so hard across the palms, he would snap his yard-long ruler in two.’
    • ‘For example, I believe you have the right to smack the person in front of you with a grocery divider if they're taking too long going through their change purse at the cash.’
    • ‘If smacking children becomes illegal those people who really want to change or become better parents will not speak out for fear of consequences.’
    • ‘His mother had tried to smack Jeff for eating the leftover food and instead Jeff ended up hitting her.’
    • ‘He looked shocked and hurt that his mother had so openly smacked him as if he were a street urchin.’
    • ‘The campaign to make smacking a crime will do more harm than good.’
    • ‘Despite my professional training, I had always thought that I would smack my children if they needed punishing.’
    • ‘I get offended, and upset, by children running around, out of control, by their mothers shouting at them, smacking them or swearing at them, should I call for a ban on that too?’
    • ‘If you smacked any other person than a child then you would be charged with a level of assault, so why is it legal for a parent to assault a child?’
    • ‘Parents will now be the only people legally allowed to smack children, and childcare organisations say they hope the law will eventually be extended to parents as well.’
    • ‘Yet, when Lydia grew up to be fourteen years old, she smacked her mother one day.’
    slap, hit, strike, spank, cuff, clout, thump, punch, rap, swat, thwack, crack
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Smash, drive, or put forcefully into or onto something.
      ‘he smacked a fist into the palm of a black-gloved hand’
      • ‘One clasped her wrists together, one smacked her arms to her body, one slammed her legs tight and the other wrapped around her ankles.’
      • ‘She clenched her fists and smacked Muketsu hard with her knuckles.’
      • ‘I remember the police smacking people with batons near’
      • ‘The door had smacked right into Amy, knocking her off her feet, her nose bleeding.’
      • ‘Scott jackets the entire shaft in impact-resistant fiberglass so it won't splinter when a rogue wave has you smacking it against the gunwale.’
      • ‘Whenever I am driving, I can barely avoid being smacked by some or the other road-user for no fault of mine.’
      • ‘She let out a small cry of surprise and then smacked her palm against the surface of the water in the bucket, causing it to splash all over Will's chest.’
      • ‘He hit the ground hard and fast, jostling every bone in his body and smacking his head against the back wall of the pod, immediately losing consciousness.’
      • ‘Her hand flew up and smacked Kim forcefully around the face.’
      • ‘Jacob leaped again, then darted downward from midair, smacking right into Steve's chest and knocking them both down.’
      • ‘The victim said he felt a huge blow, was smacked on the lips, ended up crouched and fell to his knees on the ground.’
      • ‘Scientists may have discovered the impact site of one big space rock that smacked into the South Pacific just a few hundred years ago.’
      • ‘His fist smacked into her chest and she grunted in pain but held fast, despite her lacerated hands.’
      • ‘I opened my eyes and realized Paul's meaty hands were around my throat and he was smacking the back of my head on the floor.’
      • ‘I ask, but he just starts crying loudly as Babsy smacks me with small clutch purse.’
      • ‘As she crossed the road, some fool driving at 70 mph smacked into her, and she was thrown into the air and hit the road at the other side of the car.’
      • ‘The intruder shot across the floor in a straight horizontal line to smack against a pillar in a bone-crushing impact.’
      • ‘The recoil brought the barrel upwards and it smacked into her face, leaving a livid bruise.’
      • ‘He kept running and smacked into him, knocking both of them down in the muck on the ground.’
      • ‘She elbowed the back of Bashir's head, smacking his face against the ground and leaving him unconscious, and that was that.’
      • ‘I inhaled a lungful of salt water, jerked my head up to choke and gasp for air, then smacked my face back into the water so I could monitor the shark.’
      bang, slam, crash, thump, sling, fling
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Part (one's lips) noisily in eager anticipation or enjoyment of food, drink, or other pleasures.
      • ‘Kaafk pushed another large piece of bird into his mouth, lips smacking, a sincere effort, then chased the swallow with wine.’
      • ‘Comparisons were made, lips were smacked, tongues were rolled and more thoughts were offered on the flavours and subtleties.’
      • ‘Kalvyn was steps ahead as he smacked noisily on the delicious bird.’
      • ‘The sound of someone else's smacking lips and clonking teeth makes the stomach scream in protest.’
      • ‘Her frizzy auburn hair was held back by a pencil and a clip, and she smacked her lips loudly as she set four beers and a shot of whiskey in on the table in front of them.’
      • ‘He smacked his choppy lips, his moist skin dark olive green in the candlelight.’
      • ‘This may seem like something very minor to some people, but the sight and sound of chewed food and smacking lips at the table make me lose my appetite.’
      • ‘They include: making strange faces and noises, chewing, swallowing and smacking the lips, plucking at the clothes.’
      • ‘He slowly opened his eyes and smacked his tongue against his lips.’
    3. 1.3archaic Crack (a whip)

adverb

informal
  • 1In a sudden and violent way.

    ‘I ran smack into the back of a parked truck’
    • ‘The new Opposition leader has had a dream ride, but this week he's landed smack bang into political reality.’
    • ‘They brought with them the philosophies, values and attitudes of the counter-culture, and ran smack bang into those of the conservative, small town communities into which they moved.’
    • ‘I bumped smack bang into Kelley as he emerged from the family room carrying a coffee table.’
    • ‘These are big punchers and Diaz will fight right smack within their power range.’
    • ‘The ball hit her smack against the side of her head, sending the cell phone flying to slide along the floor and under a bleacher, a broken fake nail not far behind it.’
    • ‘As Titta watches impassively through the window of his hotel room, a suited man in the traffic island below, distracted by the sight of a passing woman, walks smack bang into a lamppost.’
    • ‘She sailed across the room, landing smack in the unsuspecting dark-haired boy's arms.’
    • ‘It was when cheap sound cards and computers hit Australia, and collided smack bang with a dance music industry on the upswing, that the revolution really began.’
    • ‘Five kids were stacked in one corner, one had run smack bang into the goal post, two were clinging to her brother's legs and three had climbed onto James’ back.’
    • ‘Actually, he had sent it flying through the air, and smack bang into the maître d's left eye, but that's just a minor detail.’
    • ‘He plonked smack bang on the green green grass of Lismore Lake.’
    • ‘So I had my first dove before I'd had my first period - before I'd even had my first kiss - and when it took hold of me I fell smack bang in love.’
    • ‘But just as I turned away from my locker, I bumped smack into someone's shoulder.’
    • ‘They were walking sidelong the lockers to their own when a locker opened up out of nowhere and hit Mae smack in the face.’
    • ‘After she'd stopped screaming she turns to run out of the rood, smack bang into the door.’
    • ‘I turned around to see what he was yelling about when I ran smack into a locker door.’
    • ‘And as I hurtled round the corner, I ran smack bang into them and fell.’
    • ‘Hurriedly turning a corner, Tielle ran smack bang into a large figure heading in her direction.’
    • ‘If you were, you'd be smack bang in the firing line of his new book.’
    straight, right, directly, squarely, headlong, dead, plumb, point-blank
    exactly, precisely
    slap, bang, slap bang, smack bang
    spang, smack dab
    View synonyms
  • 2Exactly; precisely.

    ‘our mother's house was smack in the middle of the city’
    • ‘RTD and the other writers have done a fantastic job bringing Dr Who smack bang up to date.’
    • ‘Then, smack bang in the middle of Anderson's foray into investigative journalism came September 11.’
    • ‘Wet and Wild is a relatively new water park, smack bang next to Movie World.’
    • ‘A sort of Spanish Rye, smack bang in South America.’
    • ‘However, they also put you smack bang in with all your competitors making it easier for the browser to comparison shop.’
    • ‘On my way back to the camp I nearly ran smack into the blonde girlfriend of the Range Rover pilot as she delicately stepped from the women's porto-can.’
    • ‘Landing smack bang in the midst of all these misfits is Vlad, a seemingly normal guy who appears to have everything, including looks, talent and confidence.’
    • ‘This month's flat of the month is right smack bang in the middle of town located beside ‘Beef Eaters’.’
    • ‘There's a clear warning sign planted smack bang next to her photo on the Wimbledon poster.’
    • ‘I work pretty much smack bang in the middle of it all in Farringdon, right next to the unmarked Reuters building, which is Fort Knox by the way.’
    • ‘The garden of No 10 is a delightful oasis smack bang in the centre of town.’
    • ‘‘The other thing,’ Abby chips in, ‘because it's a joint project with the library and we're smack bang in the middle of Central Library, we're going to have access to all their resources.’’
    • ‘Well, unless you've been living under a rock you'll know that we are smack bang in the middle of NZ Music month.’
    • ‘Asia's largest slum lies smack bang between a high-tech business district with gleaming glass skyscrapers and a tiny Mumbai suburb dotted with grand Art Deco mansions.’
    • ‘I've no aspirations-I'm living smack bang in the middle of my aspiration and it's a great place to be.’
    • ‘Last year on holiday in Florida we were right smack bang in the path of Hurricane Charley, itself a Cat 5 storm although nowhere near as big as Katrina and Rita.’
    • ‘I worked out that at default, its set dead smack bang in the middle.’
    • ‘We had booked into a guesthouse smack bang in the centre of the shopping district on Hong Kong Island.’
    • ‘These shops are placed smack bang in the middle of a walkway, in an apparent effort to squeeze as much rent money as possible from the shopping centre.’
    • ‘Apart from Evan, who's sitting smack bang in the centre of the room, the place is empty.’
    • ‘Right smack bang in the middle of the chart were Virginia and Wisconsin, each bearing an average IQ of 100.’
    straight, right, directly, squarely, headlong, dead, plumb, point-blank
    exactly, precisely
    slap, bang, slap bang, smack bang
    spang, smack dab
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 16th century (in the sense part (one's lips) noisily): from Middle Dutch smacken, of imitative origin; compare with German schmatzen eat or kiss noisily.

Pronunciation:

smack

/smak/

Main definitions of smack in English

: smack1smack2smack3smack4smack5

smack2

verb

[NO OBJECT]smack of
  • 1 Have a flavor of; taste of.

    ‘the tea smacked of peppermint’
    • ‘It offers the drinker not an overpowering smack of peat, but a delicious honeyed, floral sweetness.’
    taste of, have the flavour of, have the savour of
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Suggest the presence or effects of (something wrong or unpleasant)
      ‘the whole thing smacks of a cover-up’
      • ‘This whole episode smacks of a serious dereliction of duty, certainly by the Fire Service for which the chief must be held accountable, but perhaps by other departments as well.’
      • ‘This smacks of electioneering gone wrong to me, and further erodes the health minister's reputation.’
      • ‘The tightrope walk between self-promotion for the sake of viability and distaste for anything that smacks of selling-out has presented Stanley with a dilemma.’
      • ‘This whole proposal smacks of a level of control that this city - that no city in Canada - should give to the police.’
      • ‘Some suggest this smacks of rural mail delivery funding the federal government.’
      • ‘By sticking to the line that the air marshals alone are right and everyone else is wrong they betray a mindset which smacks of cover-up and hints at lack of tangible evidence.’
      • ‘Well, does it not smack of some kind of deal gone wrong?’
      • ‘But the whole book smacks of self righteous mockery and I hardly think this is the way a responsible, caring parent would wish to raise their children.’
      • ‘But some officiants I spoke to sternly discourage inclusion of anything which might smack of religion - even a fondly remembered hymn.’
      • ‘The whole exercise smacks of the new political class.’
      • ‘If that is really what happened, it is wrong of McCarthy and smacks of a lack of discipline on the part of the player which must be condemned with contempt.’
      • ‘The whole situation smacks of a double standard.’
      • ‘It would all smack of politicians appointing a Speaker to suit themselves.’
      • ‘But at least one protester said revelations that others were paid makes the whole demonstration smack of political opportunism.’
      • ‘Anything else smacks of ‘elitism’, the paternalist attempt by some to dictate to others what they ought to want.’
      • ‘With a history of con artists using small companies as a base to defraud the public, anything that smacks of looser controls makes regulators squeamish.’
      • ‘The whole episode smacks of expediency and cowardice.’
      • ‘Some people remain surprised that in this modern age we should still be ruled over by any sort of royalty, as the whole bejewelled charade smacks of musty old deference.’
      • ‘Critics have always maintained the present system smacks of cronyism and cover-up.’
      • ‘To suggest any changes in that respect would be deemed politically incorrect and would smack of extremism.’
      suggest, hint at, have overtones of, have a suggestion of, have the air of, give the impression of, have the hallmark of, have the stamp of, resemble, seem like
      View synonyms

noun

a smack of
  • 1A flavor or taste of.

    ‘anything with even a modest smack of hops dries the palate’
    taste, flavour, savour
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A trace or suggestion of.
      ‘I hear the smack of collusion between them’
      • ‘I usually prefer my words in neat parcels, bare little things that are scratched onto the page with a smack of impressionism.’
      trace, tinge, touch, suggestion, hint, scintilla, impression, overtone, air, suspicion, whisper, whiff
      View synonyms

Origin

Old English smæc flavor, smell of Germanic origin; related to Dutch smaak and German Geschmack.

Pronunciation:

smack

/smak/

Main definitions of smack in English

: smack1smack2smack3smack4smack5

smack3

noun

US
  • 1A fishing boat, often one equipped with a well for keeping the caught fish alive.

    • ‘After 1750 some of the immature fish, known as grille, were carried alive by means of wells built into the hulls of the smacks.’
    • ‘The smack is amplified by the posture of the falling fish, which typically flops sideways so that its flank hits the water.’
    • ‘The carriage of salmon was central to the profitability of the smacks, and increased amounts were shipped to London in ice as fresh fish.’
    1. 1.1British A single-masted sailboat used for fishing or coastal commerce.
      • ‘During the early years these were sailing smacks, but the yard was at the forefront of the development of steam trawlers and came to specialise in long-range trawlers for the Hull distant water fleet.’
      • ‘He gives us a wonderful tale of hitch-hiking aboard a motley assortment of craft - freights, dhows, yachts and fishing smacks and meeting interesting and colourful men and women on the way.’
      • ‘We are then brought to the consideration of the question whether, upon the facts appearing in these records, the fishing smacks were subject to capture by the armed vessels of the United States during the recent war with Spain.’
      • ‘Pirates of the Caribbean smacks its comedy up against bone-shuddering battles and, like even the worst pirate capers, has ships of great beauty.’
      • ‘The Berwick evidence also indicates the high degree of competition and control exerted over road haulage by the two shipping companies operating smacks.’
      • ‘Berwick smacks were sloops with a single tall mainmast.’
      • ‘The trade to London remained profitable for the fewer smacks engaged in it but other vessels owned by the company struggled to find regular employment.’
      • ‘He brought along press cuttings of the rescue of crew from the smack Argo by Clacton lifeboatmen in 1936.’
      • ‘Britannia, the oldest surviving smack belonging to the company, 71 carried a cargo of salt to Riga in 1823 but was employed intermittently after that.’

Origin

Early 17th century: from Dutch smak, of unknown ultimate origin.

Pronunciation:

smack

/smak/

Main definitions of smack in English

: smack1smack2smack3smack4smack5

smack4

noun

informal
  • Heroin.

    • ‘I've been in and out of jail and round in circles for years - desperately wanting to get off drugs but finding no way to get off the merry-go-round of smack, stealing and the nick.’
    • ‘She graduates to heroin - her boyfriend is on smack too - and her addiction takes its toll on her family.’
    • ‘As I walked out with my suitcase, other residents and some of the counsellors said I would be back on smack within days of me leaving.’
    • ‘Which got me to thinking that a true addict wouldn't label their skunk, smack or horse with the petite and clinical summation of ‘hard drugs’.’
    • ‘Forget smack, skag and crack - this is the future.’
    • ‘I am tempted to spend a thousand quid on smack, shag a back-street-slapper and spend the rest of my life in a cardboard box - but I do not.’
    • ‘If you go to a dealer to buy it, they will most likely also have other drugs, therefore anyone who wants a smoke will get pills, coke, possibly smack or crack offered to them.’
    • ‘They take drugs, they take ecstasy, speed and smack because, to be honest, they're good fun.’
    • ‘By this time, his tolerance to smack was way down.’
    • ‘I'm assuming that the reason Mia Wallace overdosed was because she mistook Vincent's smack for coke, and the former isn't snortable.’
    • ‘He got into debt buying smack from prison dealers.’
    • ‘Something he has never done: Hard drugs like smack or cocaine.’
    • ‘Alas, a fish cannot live without water, a heroin junkie cannot survive without smack, and I just can't function without my dancing.’
    • ‘Our footballers are too stupid to tell the difference between smack and steroids and haven't a clue where to score either.’
    • ‘Long term it is more addictive than smack; also you need lots of it.’
    • ‘Sympathy is due for a brief moment when one of these girls pukes on him after snorting smack in his bathroom, but quickly evaporates when he wonders if he might still get her to sleep with him.’
    • ‘Jerry also works the streets, pimping his old lady Stella to raise the cash to buy smack from the repellent drug lord, Fats.’
    • ‘He was so much stronger than cocaine, wasn't it supposed to be as dangerous as smack?’
    • ‘But I could see from her eyes she was away with the fairies, courtesy of smack, methadone, or maybe some indiscriminate bottle of tranquillizers.’
    • ‘When her little sister gets shot up with some bad smack by a greedy dope pusher, Coffy decides to exact her revenge all the way up the food chain.’

Origin

1940s: probably an alteration of Yiddish schmeck a sniff.

Pronunciation:

smack

/smak/

Main definitions of smack in English

: smack1smack2smack3smack4smack5

smack5

noun

in phrase talk smack
informal
  • Speak insultingly of someone, especially to intentionally rankle them.

    • ‘I'm the one who gets to talk smack about other moms, not her!’
    • ‘Talking smack about a larger rival is, of course, a time-honored business tactic.’
    • ‘Well, he's probably not going to remember because of the state he was in, but he was talking smack about you.’
    • ‘Of course, others prefer to talk smack.’
    • ‘Does it detract from the game not hearing the banter of defensive players talking smack?’
    • ‘Of course, when you talk smack, sometimes you get smacked back.’
    • ‘So before you continue to talk smack on me, why don't you clarify it with me first.’
    • ‘However, it seems to me that XFL players are more concerned with poor attempts at talking smack than they are about actually playing.’
    • ‘And, of course, I don't talk any smack about other Canadian schools here in the Imprint pages.’
    • ‘I love the Yankee fans talking smack, only to see their team collapse once again.’
    • ‘After the game Garnett said that all of the Clips were talking mad smack the entire game, "even their coach."’
    • ‘I wanted to be so close to the action that I could hear these guys hit and talk smack.’
    • ‘Either way, Walker is in total beach bum mode, spending most of the film lounging in his board shorts and flip flops and talking smack to Scott Caan.’
    • ‘Why do so many of your interviews feature you talking smack about some celebrity or rock star?’
    • ‘Bruce works his pupils hard, but there is a great atmosphere in his gym, and between yelling at us to try harder, he finds plenty of time to talk smack to everyone.’
    • ‘And, as all of us recall from our schoolyard days, big guys like Thompson don't need to run around picking fights, talking smack, and constantly reminding us of how tough they are because, well, look at them.’
    • ‘If somebody's talking smack about me, I'm just glad to be mentioned in that article.’
    • ‘When it comes to talking smack, Robinson simply doesn't.’
    • ‘If you ever talk smack online about your job and you think it's OK because you're at home in a private chat area, get ready for a rude wake-up call.’

Pronunciation:

smack

/smak/