Definition of slugfest in English:

slugfest

noun

North American
informal
  • A tough and challenging contest, especially in sports such as boxing and baseball.

    • ‘Every night, it's gladiatorial slugfests and verbal duels to the death.’
    • ‘Bloodshed, even death, are overt objectives as extended Andean families, called ayllus, square off in slugfests that can last from a few minutes to nearly a week.’
    • ‘And they didn't disappoint the crowd of just over 3,000, posting two unanswered second-half tries in a spirited display as the weather deteriorated, reducing the match to a slugfest.’
    • ‘In this way, players have to be much more deliberate about the punch that's thrown, because trying to turn the match into a slugfest will only tire your boxer out and make him susceptible to a quick knockout from your rival.’
    • ‘If Cleveland needs slugfests, Oakland needs pitching duels.’
    • ‘The games, the drama of a pitching duel, the back and forth of a slugfest, a pennant race between good teams (before the wild card made that just about defunct), the history and so much more.’
    • ‘Covering these slugfests blends sports reporting and instant history.’
    • ‘And a slugfest is just what the '04 race could become, especially if Dean's insurgency continues to pick up steam.’
    • ‘The top four points earners in the final Challenge standings each won their first-round race, setting up a slugfest in the semi-finals.’
    • ‘When I got on board - as a fan, if not a true believer - the group was entrenched in a slugfest with the flourishing occult business.’
    • ‘By now the match had settled into a slugfest for possession and territory.’
    • ‘I told him I often had to replace an online (in-my-mind) persona with the real world personality and the two entities often had a bit of a slugfest battling out who would be dominant.’
    • ‘Not only did Denmark win the verbal slugfest, it dominated the 1-0 match.’
    • ‘The 1884 slugfest also serves as a reminder that a single ill-advised sentence from a warm-up speaker or a campaign surrogate can easily explode into a full-scale flap when time and partisan tempers are short.’
    • ‘Our four services practice variations of it, and our doctrine emphasizes the need to strike the enemy where he is weak instead of fighting toe-to-toe slugfests.’
    • ‘As the opposite sides in the mayoral race draw their lines and gear up for the all-island slugfest, the detritus of local obsolete municipal councils are getting themselves ready to make their now-squelched voices heard.’
    • ‘Clarke's performance poisoned the public hearings, leading to weeks of a partisan slugfest.’
    • ‘Rather than fight toe-to-toe slugfests, American military officers prefer to back off, pound the enemy with precision airpower and artillery, and ‘set the conditions’ for a ground assault.’
    • ‘This is basically an even matchup, a toe-to-toe slugfest of a heavyweight championship battle in the making.’
    • ‘Both were settling into the fight, which was establishing itself as a boxing match and not a slugfest at all.’

Origin

Early 20th century: from slug + -fest.

Pronunciation:

slugfest

/ˈsləɡˌfest/