Main definitions of slub in English

: slub1slub2

slub1

noun

  • 1A lump or thick place in yarn or thread.

    • ‘I have no complaints with the yarn, except for the occasional gigantic slub or break that's been tied up.’
    • ‘While bright color and multicolored nubs and slubs enlivened the tweeds, the houndstooth wovens were often found in black and white.’
    • ‘After twenty years in New York she began to notice odd alterations in the texture of the city, ‘little slubs in the weave’, sightings here and there of foxes and coyotes and wild turkeys, even wild deer.’
    • ‘Natural fiber color variation, slubs and knots are an intricate part of each textile design and are used to enhance the beauty and texture of each pattern.’
    • ‘Donegal now describes the wool tweed that has colorful thick slubs woven into the fabric.’
    • ‘Silk doupioni is a type of silk fabric that is riddled with irregularly spaced slubs, which give it a certain charm.’
    1. 1.1Fabric woven from yarn or thread containing lumps or thick spots.
      • ‘The shirt range consists of solids in twills, poplins, structures, linens and checks, as well as slubs, dobbies and indigos in pleasing colours of the season.’
      • ‘I believe the texture in the fabric was called slub and they may be an acetate rayon blend.’

adjective

  • [attributive] (of fabric) having an irregular appearance caused by uneven thickness of the warp.

    • ‘These fabrics had a linen weave with slub accents, and came in deep earthy colors as well as soft blues, greens, khakis and peach.’
    • ‘These fabrics range from 7 1/2-ounce and 8-ounce ring shirtings to 11 1/2-ounce slub fabrics.’

Origin

Early 19th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

slub

/sləb/

Main definitions of slub in English

: slub1slub2

slub2

noun

  • Wool that has been slightly twisted in preparation for spinning.

    • ‘The fleece or slubbing thus is wound around the filaments while the latter are twisted with the fleece between them, about a common axis.’
    • ‘The swagged curtains were beige slub silk, the sofas brown and cream, the walls aqua.’
    • ‘The rectangle bell shade is a reddish-brown textile with black edged trim and natural black slubbing.’
    • ‘The slubbing is guided in the clamping gap of the delivery rolls which are arranged downstream from the drafting system and at a distance therefrom.’
    • ‘A machine which reduces slubbing to a finer thread or roving, making it more regular and even puts more twists in and winds it onto a smaller tube.’
    • ‘During winding a bar holds the slubbing down so that the spindle rotation causes the twisted yarn to be wound onto the cop.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Twist (wool) in preparation for spinning.

    • ‘The slubbing billy came into use by the 1790s and looked very similar to an early spinning jenny.’
    • ‘When the slubbing is attenuated during yarn manufacture, a very even blend of dyed and undyed fibre is produced and by this means, if black has been used, a grey yarn results.’
    • ‘It removes empty cans from drawing and slubbing machines and places them in position for reuse at carding machines.’
    • ‘The slubbing machine took the raw wool and combed it into long ropes of yarn that could easily be spun in the spinning machines.’
    • ‘Spinning frames draw these slubbing or condensing out to the required fineness of yarn and insert twist to form the yarn.’
    • ‘All the advantage in technology the slubbing and roving process is climinated and the material in processed through only the passage of fly frames, viz. the canfed incer frames.’

Origin

Late 18th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

slub

/sləb/