Definition of slow-moving in English:

slow-moving

adjective

  • Slow in movement or action.

    ‘the slow-moving hands of a clock’
    ‘the early part of the movie is slow-moving, with very little action’
    • ‘At more than nine minutes in length, the track is an ambient impasse, a slow-moving mass of nothing much.’
    • ‘However, structural problems and a slow-moving government leave doubts about a turnaround.’
    • ‘In fact, the change in demographics is a slow-moving process that can easily be overcome by decent productivity gains.’
    • ‘"As it turns out, the fish are mostly feeding on aquatic invertebrates found in the slow-moving drainages near fields," he said.’
    • ‘It begins in a low key and slow-moving fashion as a middle-aged couple discusses something that's not at all clear to us but certainly sounds ominous.’
    • ‘As we crossed the New York state line, we passed a slow-moving combine in a field of soybeans, kicking up sprays of mud from ruts that bore an odd resemblance to chocolate pudding.’
    • ‘The sculpture balances over a large, shallow, black granite reflecting pool of slow-moving water.’
    • ‘The first few hours are rather dull and slow-moving, and the show never really gets itself motivated past this point.’
    • ‘Scout remembers that Maycomb was a tired, slow-moving town when she first knew it as a child years ago.’
    • ‘Even those ordered deported by the slow-moving immigration appeals system often simply disappear.’

Pronunciation:

slow-moving

/ˌslōˈmo͞oviNG/