Definition of skin in US English:

skin

noun

  • 1The thin layer of tissue forming the natural outer covering of the body of a person or animal.

    ‘I use body lotion to keep my skin soft’
    ‘a flap of skin’
    • ‘Sarah felt the warmth in her cheeks and the soft carpet caressing the sensitive skin between her bare toes.’
    • ‘Every inch of exposed skin was tanned from the sun, but not to an extreme.’
    • ‘In simple terms, these products won't block pores or irritate sensitive skin.’
    • ‘Every time his hands touched the bare skin of her neck, it sent shivers throughout her whole body.’
    • ‘Typical teen problems like zits had not touched his flawless pale skin.’
    • ‘Her exposed skin tingled against the cold, and she was so fervently trembling she was certain she would faint.’
    • ‘A tuberculin skin test result is positive in less than 50 percent of patients.’
    • ‘His lightly muscled tanned bare skin glistened in the sun and he felt very much like an article on display.’
    • ‘The light never touched his soft, tan skin.’
    • ‘She paused, looking up so Yuko was looking at the creamy pale skin of her throat.’
    • ‘"In the past lasers couldn't safely penetrate darker pigmented skin, " Dr Weiss said.’
    • ‘The woman turns around, her dark brown skin glowing with the warmth of her smile.’
    • ‘His caramel colored skin glowed when he was happy.’
    • ‘His fair skin was burned on his cheeks because they were very rosy.’
    • ‘An assortment of bruises in varying shade of purple and blue speckled my usually smooth, olive colored skin.’
    • ‘Robert tried to fight the creature with his gun, but the bullets couldn't penetrate its thick skin.’
    • ‘Her smooth ivory skin glistened with passion induced perspiration.’
    • ‘Long thin scars and old bite marks were scattered over the dark leathery skin of the demons' bodies.’
    • ‘He leaned in towards her, caressing her exposed creamy skin with uncharacteristic gentleness.’
    • ‘If moisturizer doesn't cure your itchy dry skin, schedule an appointment with your doctor.’
    epidermis, dermis
    complexion, colouring, skin colour, skin tone, pigmentation
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The skin of a dead animal with or without the fur, used as material for clothing or other items.
      ‘is this real crocodile skin?’
      • ‘The Sun Dance ceremony practised by Plains Indians required the skins of dead animals in order to glorify the spirit of the wolf.’
      • ‘It had fresco brick wall sides peaking upward as if inside a tent, there were tanned pelts of animal skins as tapestries on the wall.’
      • ‘Leopard skins, neo-traditionalist insignia, made frequent appearances at the installation of chiefs.’
      • ‘Handbags and clothing are crafted from animal skins.’
      • ‘But does this change of heart over furry fashions mean that real fur and skins are here to stay?’
      • ‘The wearing of skins as normal clothing was unknown for both the Saxons and the Vikings.’
      • ‘When Galster happened upon a stall with three adult clouded leopard skins on display, he knew he was on to something.’
      • ‘It is no coincidence that the process of turning animal skins into leather is called tanning.’
      • ‘In many places in India the traditional Coracle is made by blowing up the skin of a dead buffalo, stitching it together and sitting on it like using a large float.’
      • ‘At first Pryce thought they were wearing furs or skins of a striped animal, but then determined that their bodies were painted.’
      • ‘The ambitious divorcee noted how he made the skins of these dead animals so soft and supple.’
      • ‘Tanning, the process that converts raw hides or skins into leather, utilizes hazardous substances such as chromium and phenol.’
      • ‘In Masume he sold chamois skins to tanneries and there began his interest in leather.’
      • ‘The Inuit made all their clothing from various animal skins and hides.’
      • ‘They attempt to kill the bigger crocodiles for their skins, but this is a dangerous profession; it's difficult to bag a full grown male.’
      • ‘Millions of us manage to make a living every day without wearing the skins of dead minks.’
      • ‘Equally important this season are textures, so there are generous lashings of exotic skins, suedes, leathers and horsehair.’
      • ‘He doffed his cap, also made from the skin of a dead animal - I later learned it was a raccoon.’
      • ‘The court martial comes quickly and my newly sewed on stripes are ripped from my sleeve like the skin of a dead catfish.’
      • ‘Here's one that's really important because we've got a lot of sports fans in this town: touching the skin of a dead pig makes one unclean.’
      hide, pelt, fleece
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 A container made from the skin of an animal such as a goat, used for holding liquids.
      • ‘At about noon we found another stream and refilled our water skins.’
      • ‘He had finished washing his knife and had started filling up their water skins for the night.’
      • ‘Amarice refilled the water skins while a few others went off exploring.’
      • ‘A deep, clear lake centered the oasis, and the first thing both riders did when they arrived was fill their skins full of the life-giving water.’
      • ‘By then, help had arrived in the form of an annoyed looking healer, Julan and Wethin trailing him and holding water skins awkwardly.’
      • ‘She then filled the skins with it and hurried back to the campsite.’
      • ‘The water skin filled, quickly, and out of the top a stream of water burst out.’
      • ‘The three were given water skins and enough food for a week.’
      • ‘He shakes his wine skin and hops off of the branch in which he was sitting and walks to a small stream and fills his skin.’
      • ‘The food supplies are gone and their water skins are empty.’
      • ‘After Larken had refilled their water skins in the nearby creek, she began to build a fire.’
      • ‘It contained food for three lunches as well as some small water skins.’
      • ‘She found the vial, and poured it into one of the almost-empty water skins.’
      • ‘The company watered the horses and filled the water skins on the wagon with water, and everything was tied down and given a last check.’
      • ‘He instead took the job of filling their water skins.’
      • ‘They reached the food store, and Lydia immediately grabbed a few skins of water.’
      • ‘Lin appeared with the skins used for canteens, two filled with water and two with ale.’
      • ‘Three days passed, and the water skins were quite empty, the meager provisions long finished.’
  • 2The peel or outer layer of certain fruits or vegetables.

    • ‘Fruit skins were prepared fresh without eliminating physiological stress reactions prior to testing.’
    • ‘However, wine yeast occurs in honey and the skins of sugar-rich fruits, and fermentation would have set in quickly in the hot climate.’
    • ‘Peel the skin from the roast pepper halves and cut the stem off the aubergine halves.’
    • ‘The skins were peeled from frozen berries to avoid mixing with pulp.’
    • ‘Making their way through the fruit skins and the heaps of garbage they start out towards the bus stand.’
    • ‘The skin itself contains more tannin and, in black grapes, a colouring pigment.’
    • ‘Remove the tomatoes with a slotted spoon, and peel off the skins while still warm.’
    • ‘The fruit is eaten as a vegetable, the inner skin is ground into meal, and oil is extracted from the seeds.’
    • ‘Then, using a swivel vegetable peeler, peel off the skin.’
    • ‘Kitchen garbage, like the parts of vegetables that are not eaten and discarded fruit skins, may be utilized as compost.’
    • ‘I bit into the peach and the fragile skin broke, filling my mouth with juice and peach meats.’
    • ‘Wheat bran and the skins of fruits and vegetables are sources of insoluble fiber.’
    • ‘If you dried out banana skins, and smoked them, you would hallucinate immediately.’
    • ‘The next day I began taking hardcore drugs - dried banana skins.’
    • ‘The fruit is shaped like but smaller than a pear, and has a shiny brown scaly skin.’
    • ‘Pull out the stems and peel the skins off the peppers.’
    • ‘Simply peel away the outer skin of the kiwi and place in a hard-cooked egg slicer.’
    • ‘The skins and zest were peeled and the clementines were sectioned.’
    • ‘The skins provide red wine with its colour and contain the highest concentration of polyphenols, potent antioxidants.’
    • ‘The dried fruit skins are ground and provide a cheap alternative to coffee.’
    peel, rind, outside
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 The thin outer covering of a sausage.
      • ‘Peel the skins from the sausages - this is easiest if you slit the skin with the point of a knife then pull off the skins.’
      • ‘In developing countries gut skins dominate the sausage market.’
      • ‘Then, I imagine, it is pumped into sausage skins and served in a bun smothered in ketchup and mustard.’
      • ‘Nicknamed bangers because of their tendency to explode if the skins are not pierced before frying, sausages have come a long way.’
      • ‘It is a pudding in the old sense of something enclosed in a sausage skin.’
      • ‘After less than a minute, the mixture was ready for the sausage machine, where skins (sheep and pig casing) are filled and the links twisted by hand.’
      • ‘Squeeze the sausage meat out of the sausages and discard the skins.’
      • ‘In another casserole, put the luganica sausage, free of skin and reduced to crumbs, and a little oil and fry until it starts to brown.’
    2. 2.2 A thin layer forming on the surface of certain hot liquids, such as milk, as they cool.
      • ‘Air must be excluded from the can by a tight-fitting lid, or a skin can form in the can.’
      • ‘It is chilly enough that where the water is calm a skin of ice has formed.’
      • ‘To make matters worse, spinach was often on the menu and there was a skin on the milk they served for breakfast.’
      film, coating, coat, layer, overlay
      View synonyms
    3. 2.3 The outermost layer of a structure such as a building or aircraft.
      • ‘Check for wrinkles in the fuselage skin where the main gear leg goes into the fuselage.’
      • ‘The hole in the floor was covered with a sliding panel flush with the aircraft's skin.’
      • ‘Oddly enough, he could see sparks fly as the bullets impacted the skin of the aircraft.’
      • ‘With the wing structure complete, the wings were then covered with aircraft grade mahogany skin.’
      • ‘The stair and theatre foyers are complex folded volumes that reiterate the language of the building skin.’
      • ‘Herzog & de Meuron's abiding interest in building skins is aggressively advanced at the Walker.’
      • ‘Obviously, there's some damage to the exterior skin; a couple of panels that have come off.’
      • ‘It was going up to the 27th floor, so they had to peel the skin off of the building and peel the windows out.’
      • ‘The men swung axes and hammers into the aluminum skin on the tapering wings and fuselages.’
      • ‘Originally, the aluminum skin of the building was not supposed to have color accents, says Stern.’
      • ‘The building skin has been constructed, conceptually, from a melding of the two.’
      • ‘The wing has been detached from the fuselage to facilitate repairs to portions of the wing skin.’
      • ‘It takes only a few hours to apply the skin to the structures and to close the village off from the elements.’
      • ‘Along the fuselage belly, the skin exhibited extreme bulging typical of corrosion damage.’
      • ‘If your home has cavity walls (two separate skins of brick), filling the gap with insulating foam halves the energy loss.’
      • ‘Lux Studios preserved its exterior skin and opted for all new interiors.’
      • ‘Airlines including El Al are developing guns which will disable hijackers but not pierce the skin of an aircraft.’
      • ‘The longerons were good and did not need replacement but we did replace some skins on the lower fuselage.’
      • ‘This suggests that the explosive was placed directly on the aircraft's skin.’
      • ‘It took four months to model the skin, a curvilinear structure and the auditorium interior and ceiling.’
      casing, cover, covering, exterior, pod
      View synonyms
    4. 2.4usually skins A strip of sealskin or other material attached to the underside of a ski to prevent a skier from slipping backward while climbing.
      • ‘This package includes learning the art of climbing with skins, off-piste skiing and mountain navigation with a qualified instructor.’
      • ‘Climbing skins stick to the bottom of your skis or snowboard and let you motor uphill.’
      • ‘The route got steeper and we put climbing skins (strips of special fur) on our ski bottoms.’
      • ‘We huddle together to fit skins to our skis, fingers instantly numbed to frozen sausages.’
      • ‘Attach climbing skins to your skis and up you go.’
      • ‘My climbing skins grip slushy snow for a moment, then slip back with an exhausting lurch.’
      • ‘We stripped off the synthetic climbing skins from our skis.’
      • ‘If you're a skier, slap a pair of climbing skins on your skis and you've got an impressively efficient way to get uphill.’
      • ‘What's more, split-board skins are considerably wider, and therefore have more traction, than a skier's skins.’
      • ‘Ascending with climbing skins is easier than kicking steps, and skis let you make a fast exit when bad weather rolls in.’
      • ‘I put the skins on one more time in the timber to gain a little more vertical on the last section into Schofeild Park.’
      • ‘I understand that the skins were probably 50 years old.’
      • ‘Snap on your ski crampons if the going gets icy or your skins are slipping.’
  • 3Computing
    A customized graphic user interface for an application or operating system.

    ‘music, reviews, and attitude all wrapped up in the skin of a catalog’
    • ‘Do you have any plans to offer support for the mod community that likes to create original skins and custom levels?’
    • ‘For example, will it be possible to use custom skins or will you release tools to allow users to build custom levels?’
    • ‘The white console is customisable too, with the ability to swap everything from the console's faceplate to the skins on the software interface.’
    • ‘Not only can you download skins, but GQradio comes with a built-in skin editor so you can unleash your creative spirit.’
    • ‘They swapped modding techniques and hundreds of custom skins over the website message board.’
  • 4British informal A skinhead.

    • ‘They were surrounded by a devoted crowd of aging skins, punks & Goths worshipping at the church of Sioux.’
    • ‘Mostly it's a mixture of punks and skins but we have also played on specific skinhead-gigs.’
    • ‘From my experiences, punks & skins generally get along OK.’
    • ‘As for punks 'n' skins in Derby, there's hardly any.’
    • ‘Thanks for the interview, and thanks to all the psychos, punks and skins who've supported us in the UK.’
  • 5usually skinsinformal (especially in jazz) a drum or drum head.

    • ‘Weiss pulverizes the skins, and the guitars of Brownstein and Tucker play off of one another with furious intensity.’
    • ‘Diaz deploys at least five congas to create his dense patter, their skins tuned for maximum musicality.’
    • ‘Drummer Ste Barrow is frantically searching for a replacement having just split the skin on his bass drum.’
    • ‘These boys don't need any chemical assistance to do some very nice things to your brain; just a few strings, pedals, sticks and, er, skins.’
    • ‘Jordan, in particular, was a sight to behold as he unleashed his relentless fury on the skins.’
    • ‘The guy hits the skins as if he's trying to nail them to the floor.’
    • ‘Volunteer your band for the show, and be sure to tear up the skins with a drum solo.’
    • ‘At one point, the drummer switched instruments with the lead Live Girl - who absolutely sucked on the skins.’
    • ‘That is, the bass pounds a little heavier, the skins hit a little cleaner, and the guitars are a bit more direct, and all in the most unobtrusive way possible.’
    • ‘There's a whole list of guests on Love & Respect with Robert Palmer showing up and ex-Band drummer Levon Helm hitting the skins.’
    • ‘He created original sounds from his cymbals and skins using sticks, brushes, and even his hands.’
    • ‘With Hawkins' long, blond hair covering his goatee and Grohl wailing on the skins, it almost felt like 1993.’
    • ‘While this chaos all unfolded up front, drummer Damon Richardson beat the skins with reckless abandon.’
    • ‘Carved from tweneboa, a Ghanaian cedar tree, the drums have fragile skins and tuning pegs.’
    • ‘And last time I checked, Mr. Carlos did not pound skins for Metallica.’
    • ‘A dull aching head-ache drummed through her head like finger pads on a drum skin.’
    • ‘Steve Albini would be so proud of the heavy metallic rumblings produced by Gar Wood's bass guitar, and Jason Kourkounis simply shreds his skins.’
  • 6informal as modifier Relating to or denoting pornographic literature or films.

    ‘the skin trade’
    • ‘This is undoubtedly one of the best, most bedazzling films of his skin show career.’

verb

  • 1with object Remove the skin from (an animal or a fruit or vegetable).

    • ‘During his journey he had used the knives to skin rabbits caught by his dogs.’
    • ‘They had a sofa bed, but it looked as if they'd skinned the dog from Blues' Clues to make it.’
    • ‘Ellie sighed, said, ‘Okay, you're forgiven,’ and skinned the rabbit very carefully.’
    • ‘Then, when he had finished, he got Zi to help him skin the deer and preserve the meat, in case they ever ran out of food.’
    • ‘The first thing I ever cooked was rabbit pie - she skinned the rabbit and I did the rest.’
    • ‘Cows are still skinned and dismembered alive, and pigs are still scalded to death, just like chickens are.’
    • ‘She immediately began skinning the rabbits and cutting them into chunks of edible meat, omitting the organs.’
    • ‘He might have added that if you do try to skin a tiger one paw at a time, it will get very, very cross.’
    • ‘We even forgave him for skinning a monkey and wearing it as a coat.’
    • ‘Gutting and skinning the rabbits wouldn't take too long - Father had also taught me how to do that.’
    • ‘He skinned the large creature and tossed the large pieces of skin and fur in a pile to the side.’
    • ‘They can surf the waves, skin a rabbit and dazzle a television audience.’
    • ‘He is shown feeding the sheep and skinning a rabbit.’
    • ‘After a brisk trot back to his make shift camp, Hawk began to skin the rabbits.’
    • ‘I quickly ran over and skinned the large beast that had caused these wounds on him.’
    • ‘It is a malicious lie that the Dalits were found skinning a live cow.’
    • ‘Trudy sat squatted down, skinning a rabbit she'd caught.’
    • ‘And unless we want to be skinning some Realmshirian rabbit down the road, we do need more food.’
    • ‘She laid the logs down, started a little fire, and began skinning the deer with her sword.’
    • ‘Remove from the oven, skin the tomatoes then place everything, including any juices, in the blender.’
    peel, pare, hull
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Scratch or scrape the skin off (a part of one's body)
      ‘he scrambled down from the tree with such haste that he skinned his knees’
      • ‘Your red hair which you tied into a French braid that morning was still perfectly fine, your knee was skinned.’
      • ‘Another thing is when I skin my knee or fall, they make a big deal about it.’
      • ‘I just star fished on the ground and skinned all my knees.’
      • ‘The stairs were hard on my elbows and knees, and I skinned them all badly.’
      • ‘One particular time she remembered was when Vicki had skinned her knee on the way over to her friend Wil's house.’
      • ‘The fact I can jump into a half-pipe and never skin my knee or break a bone - the escapism is one huge appeal.’
      • ‘I'm thinking about skinning my knee, getting rug burns or ‘Indian’ burns, things like that.’
      • ‘One of Matt's friends had tripped and skinned his knee earlier that evening.’
      • ‘August was not August unless it was coloured by the few incidents of skinned knees, cuts and bruises.’
      • ‘I was lying on the ground, and I had skinned my knees and my elbows on the asphalt.’
      • ‘I, however, did seriously skin both my knees and so completely stuff myself it took about 2 hours to recover.’
      • ‘We hadn't been this close since I last skinned my knee when I was eleven.’
      • ‘She lives for the adrenaline rush of attending to ‘little angels’ who skinned their knees.’
      • ‘It's like skinning your knee when you're a little kid.’
      • ‘If you fell and skinned your knee or caught a cold, it was because God had seen you do something wrong.’
      • ‘I had skinned my knee so I sat down and Jennifer said that you could see everything from here.’
      • ‘And you'll remember stuff like a tone of voice or your knee burning because you skinned it real bad.’
      • ‘Miraculously, the victim was merely treated for skinned knees, while Simon was arrested and fined for violent conduct.’
      • ‘When I was little and I had skinned my knees or elbows or something, I'd come home crying.’
      • ‘It's right up there with having cavities drilled and skinning my knees!’
      graze, scrape, abrade, bark, cut, rub something raw, chafe
      View synonyms
  • 2informal Take money from or swindle (someone).

    • ‘The gimmick has generated so much publicity, Mercury is trying to devise an equivalent design - without skinning the author - for the planned 5,000 book run.’
    • ‘Inevitably then, it can only financially top up local authorities by skinning you and I to an even deeper extent than it is already doing.’
    swindle, defraud, cheat, fleece, exploit
    View synonyms
  • 3no object (of a wound) form new skin.

    ‘the hole in his skull skinned over’
    • ‘My guess is that the stain is too thickly applied and has skinned over.’
    1. 3.1archaic with object Cover with skin.
      ‘the wound was skinned, but the strength of his leg was not restored’

Phrases

  • be skin and bones

    • 1(of a person or animal) be very thin.

      ‘she was nothing but skin and bone’
      • ‘I treated people with unrelenting diarrhea, emaciated to skin and bone, crippled with nerve pain, and lost in dementia.’
      • ‘He was skin and bone, too weak to hold his head up.’
      • ‘One day she saw this gardener - skin and bone - working very slowly and coughing all the time.’
      • ‘If I'd lost another ten I'd have been skin and bone.’
      • ‘She was the thinnest fox he had ever seen, practically skin and bone.’
      • ‘She was only skin and bone and obviously very ill.’
      • ‘She was just skin and bone when she was rescued from the knacker's yard.’
      • ‘Posh Spice isn't all that - she's all skin and bone and she's got horrible spots.’
      • ‘She was tiny at a weight of 4lb 11 oz and she was skin and bone then… now she's a great baby to play with and she's nine months old.’
      • ‘I couldn't even tell what it was because it was skin and bone.’
    • 2(of a person or animal) be very thin.

      • ‘She was only skin and bone and obviously very ill.’
      • ‘She was the thinnest fox he had ever seen, practically skin and bone.’
      • ‘He was skin and bone, too weak to hold his head up.’
      • ‘I treated people with unrelenting diarrhea, emaciated to skin and bone, crippled with nerve pain, and lost in dementia.’
      • ‘Posh Spice isn't all that - she's all skin and bone and she's got horrible spots.’
      • ‘She was tiny at a weight of 4lb 11 oz and she was skin and bone then… now she's a great baby to play with and she's nine months old.’
      • ‘She was just skin and bone when she was rescued from the knacker's yard.’
      • ‘I couldn't even tell what it was because it was skin and bone.’
      • ‘If I'd lost another ten I'd have been skin and bone.’
      • ‘One day she saw this gardener - skin and bone - working very slowly and coughing all the time.’
  • by the skin of one's teeth

    • By a very narrow margin; barely.

      ‘I only got away by the skin of my teeth’
      • ‘A Hampshire firefighter based at Redbridge Fire Station said: ‘They only got out by the skin of their teeth.’’
      • ‘On the other end of the spectrum are cases in which a conviction is sustained, but in some ways almost by the skin of their teeth.’
      • ‘‘You have escaped prison by the skin of your teeth,’ the judge told him.’
      • ‘You have escaped from going to prison by the skin of your teeth.’
      • ‘At Pennypit, meanwhile, Berwick held on to third spot by the skin of their teeth with a one-point 26-25 win over Preston Lodge.’
      • ‘In the earlier game the Eagles got home by the skin of their teeth.’
      • ‘Well, I think they got out of this by the skin of their teeth from their point of view.’
      • ‘Shepherd ‘B’ won by the skin of their teeth to go second.’
      • ‘As the ball was kicked out referee Pet Moran blew the full time whistle with Portlaoise holding out by the skin of their teeth.’
      • ‘The Oxford University Pool Team has not lost to Cambridge since 1999, when the ‘rascal Tabs’ managed to grind out a 46-44 victory by the skin of their teeth.’
      only just, just, narrowly, by a hair's breadth, by a very small margin, by the narrowest of margins, barely, by a nose
      View synonyms
  • get under someone's skin

    • 1informal Annoy or irritate someone intensely.

      ‘it was the sheer effrontery of them that got under my skin’
      • ‘What's most annoying is that it seems to get under your skin - not irritating like a rash, more like an itch that needs to be scratched.’
      • ‘She would never let them manage to anger her or get under her skin.’
      • ‘Casey tries not to let such negativity bother him, but it gets under his skin nonetheless.’
      • ‘Ugh, someone here is getting under my skin, really starting to annoy me, and I can't put my figure on why/how exactly.’
      • ‘What gets under our skin, aggravates, infuriates, frustrates and makes us hate is of the same seed that also begets love and divine revelation.’
      • ‘This rich kid was getting under my skin, but the free ride out of town in a jiffy was what I was after.’
      irritate, annoy, gall, irk, get someone's back up, put someone's back up, pique, rankle with, nettle, needle, bother, vex, provoke, displease, upset, offend, affront, anger, exasperate, disgruntle, ruffle, get on someone's nerves, ruffle someone's feathers, make someone's hackles rise, raise someone's hackles, rub up the wrong way
      View synonyms
    • 2informal Fill someone's mind in a compelling and persistent way.

      • ‘Some songs get under your skin and refuse to move.’
      • ‘We didn't know what it was, but it got under your skin; it was a very hip, gospel, Latin sound.’
      • ‘Then I did a little play and quite liked that and it got under my skin.’
      • ‘I've never warmed to Bowie, which is the same as saying: Bowie never really chilled me, got under my skin, possessed me…’
      • ‘We wanted to make a movie that slowly got under your skin, that was about building, inescapable dread.’
      • ‘Albert's Sam is a study in understatement, slowly but surely getting under Izzy 's skin.’
      • ‘Who were the other writers who got under your skin?’
      • ‘It gets under your skin and opens up a space that is filled by sadness and silence.’
      • ‘In twice finding myself in the thick of efforts to save it from closure, the club has really got under my skin.’
      • ‘His intensely intimate music gets under your skin rather than grabbing you by the lapels.’
      obsess, intrigue, captivate, interest greatly, charm
      View synonyms
    • 3informal Reach or display a deep understanding of someone.

      ‘movies that get under the skin of our national character’
      • ‘I know it's a cliche but I thought the author really managed to get under Clara 's skin in a way which made us empathise with her.’
      • ‘And yes, you guys did manage to get under my skin.’
      • ‘He changed his ways many years ago because a good, decent woman got under his skin and made him understand what love was all about.’
      • ‘Then he comes in contact with a woman who gets under his skin.’
  • give someone (some) skin

    • informal Shake or slap hands together as a gesture or friendship or solidarity.

      • ‘I gave him some skin, and his mother gave him a hug.’
      • ‘Remember the time he went to give me skin and I shook his hand!’
      • ‘He raised up his hand, palm side down. "Give me some skin, brother." I stuck out my hand and smiled.’
      • ‘'Give me some skin on that one,' said Spencer, thrusting his palm toward Winston.’
  • have skin in the game

    • informal Have a personal investment in an organization or undertaking, and therefore a vested interest in its success.

      • ‘You have sweat on your brow, but your partner has skin in the game.’
      • ‘"You want them to have skin in the game and this is a good way to get that," he says.’
      • ‘It is for people who have skin in the game.’
      • ‘He said on "This Week" yesterday, everybody has got to have skin in the game.’
      • ‘"I never get involved in a company unless I have skin in the game," he said.’
      • ‘Sure, he had skin in the game.’
      • ‘Having skin in the game kept everyone motivated and honest, essential in an operation that trusted players to walk around with thousands of dollars in their pockets.’
      • ‘But all politics are local and it's very personal when you feel you have skin in the game.’
      • ‘A consultant may have skin in the game if you buy from a certain vendor.’
      • ‘When you share bad news and try to reassure people, they're likely not to believe you unless they feel you have skin in the game.’
  • have a thick (or thin) skin

    • Be insensitive (or oversensitive) to criticism or insults.

      • ‘I don't have a thick skin naturally, but I've had to at times.’
      • ‘I have a thick skin, but when your family members get affected by it, it's time to leave.’
      • ‘There's no point in having a thin skin in this game.’
      • ‘‘I realise that I will not be on the Christmas card list in Badenoch and Strathspey this year but I have a thick skin,’ he said.’
      • ‘Let me begin by stating that I am a human being although I have a thick skin.’
      • ‘It's a good job I have a thick skin is all I can say, the abuse was substantial and relentless.’
      • ‘The Olympic association and other officials seem to have a thick skin.’
      • ‘I have a thick skin, but I constantly ‘feel’ like I'm offending everyone.’
      • ‘Chairmen and chief executives need to have a thick skin and take justified criticism of their companies in the way it is intended.’
      • ‘Del Ponte dismissed the criticism: ‘He who does not have a thick skin should choose another field of work,’ she said.’
  • it's no skin off my nose

    • informal Used to indicate that one is not offended or adversely affected by something.

      ‘it's no skin off my nose if you don't want dessert’
      • ‘I probably shouldn't comment because it's no skin off my nose if you undergrads want to gut your services in order to get $30 more beer money a term.’
      • ‘I mean, it's no skin off my nose if Greenwald and screenwriter Ernest Thompson (On Golden Pond) wanted to go with such a formalist framework.’
      • ‘Half-joking, she notes ‘it's no skin off my nose’ if the film fails, as she's the support.’
      • ‘Look, it's no skin off my nose - he's not after me, so I couldn't care less.’
      • ‘When I say ‘it's no skin off my nose ‘, there is an immediate context that gives the expression more meaning.’
      • ‘But, finally, a word for the guys at the Met office - if your forecast does happen to be part of a conspiracy, it's no skin off my nose.’
      • ‘I assumed the position of ‘I'll go look at it, cos it's no skin off my nose’ and went along early evening.’
      i don't care, i don't mind, i'm not bothered, it doesn't bother me, it doesn't matter to me, it's of no concern to me, it's of no importance to me
      View synonyms
  • keep (or sleep in) a whole skin

    • archaic Escape being wounded or injured.

      • ‘For if he wanted to be safe, and considered it his first object to sleep in a whole skin, it had been his best way not to have stirred from home.’
      • ‘It is agreeable to keep a whole skin; but the skin still remains an organ sensitive to the atmosphere.’
      • ‘But were concerned rather in keeping a whole skin by parlaying or by spilling cowardly tears to excite pity.’
      • ‘There is defeat, even in the rest he wins, to the man who, that he may keep a whole skin, turns and runs from the battle.’
  • make someone's skin crawl (or creep)

    • Cause someone to feel fear, horror, or disgust.

      ‘a person dying in a fire—doesn't it make your skin crawl?’
      • ‘She hadn't even said anything to this girl, but she could make Hannah 's skin crawl.’
      • ‘The very idea of being around magic made Karl 's skin crawl.’
      • ‘A clerk innocently used a word to describe a section of books that made Cisneros 's skin crawl.’
      • ‘Justin was, well, Justin, and the thought of him doing that with Rebecca was enough to make Michael 's skin crawl.’
      • ‘It wasn't about all those things Francis did that made Van Gundy 's skin crawl and the hair on the back of his neck stand on end.’
      • ‘There was something about Lazar's matter-of-fact tone that made Carl 's skin crawl.’
      • ‘This assistant had the stomach for torture, bloodshed, and all of the things that made Tyrell 's skin crawl.’
      • ‘It was one of sadistic smugness that made Analise 's skin crawl.’
      • ‘His smile was silk - a malicious caress that made Joe 's skin crawl.’
      • ‘The mere knowledge that I talked to you makes Greg 's skin crawl, and I'm not going to hurt him by meeting you.’
  • there's more than one way to skin a cat

    • proverb There's more than one way of achieving one's aim.

      • ‘However, there's more than one way to skin a cat.’
      • ‘Harry Briggs, City of York councillor for Haxby, said: ‘Maybe people in Haxby have got more brains, after all there's more than one way to skin a cat.’’
      • ‘I don't necessarily see the two interpretations as mutually exclusive, because we're in the melty melty realms of myth here where there's more than one way to skin a cat.’
      • ‘You learn as you get older there's more than one way to skin a cat.’
      • ‘There is more than one way to skin a cat, or protect your assets.’
      • ‘There's innumerable ways to skin a metallic cat so why cling to an outdated formula?’
      • ‘Or more prosaically, there's more than one way to skin a cat.’
      • ‘Maybe those dummies in their corporate towers have finally gotten the message and realised that there's more than one way to skin a cat.’
      • ‘‘It is an option open to the club but there are loads of ways to skin a cat,’ he said.’
  • under the skin

    • In reality, as opposed to superficial appearances.

      ‘he still believes that all women are goddesses under the skin’
      • ‘However, under the skin, there are more significant additions and upgrades.’
      • ‘This well-crafted documentary probes under the skin of taxidermy and finds much more than glass eyes and straw.’
      • ‘And suddenly I think the tattooed man has got it wrong, and that we're not all the same under the skin.’
      • ‘We're in the tradition of journalists going out and trying to get under the skin of the country.’
      • ‘Air vents in the bonnet have also gone, another clue that things are different under the skin.’
      • ‘There is something chilling in the will for violence latent under the skin of our society - and it is not an appetite which should be fed.’
      • ‘Those more important things are easing under the skin of her characters and making sure she finds the right fit.’

Origin

Late Old English scinn, from Old Norse skinn; related to Dutch schinden ‘flay, peel’ and German schinden.

Pronunciation

skin

/skɪn//skin/