Definition of skid in US English:

skid

verb

  • 1no object (of a vehicle) slide, typically sideways or obliquely, on slippery ground or as a result of stopping or turning too quickly.

    ‘the taxicab skidded to a halt’
    • ‘Naturally, the car was hit by the bus and the car skidded onto the pavement.’
    • ‘Your Honour, it is objective evidence that whilst the vehicle was skidding, it was on its correct side of the road.’
    • ‘Through blurred eyes he watched helplessly as the bike skidded across the ground towards the tanker, sending a shower of sparks shooting up into the cold air as it scraped along the surface of the road.’
    • ‘The car skidded to a halt, and the suited policemen stepped out, hands touching their guns lightly.’
    • ‘Brown, who is based at Battlesbury Barracks in Warminster, identified himself as the driver and said his vehicle skidded on the wet road.’
    • ‘Subsequently, the vehicle skidded off the road and fell into the deep gorge.’
    • ‘Drivers compete by taking sharp turns on oval tracks that leave their cars skidding sideways.’
    • ‘Seven other accidents were also reported on the A59 in the Hessay area, with vehicles skidding into ditches.’
    • ‘The car skidded to a halt on the currently empty street.’
    • ‘The vehicle started skidding and pulled off a u-turn.’
    • ‘Everybody on board was hurt when the vehicle skidded across a two-lane highway 30 miles west of Tonopah, Nevada.’
    • ‘Traffic came to a standstill for around 22 minutes near Ulsoor Lake after a truck skidded and collided with a tourist bus on the slippery stretch.’
    • ‘Behind him, a car skidded to a halt and seconds later someone ran up behind him.’
    • ‘Theo slammed on the brakes, and the car skidded sideways into the road.’
    • ‘The vehicle skidded off to the side of the road, and Aruna saw a chance.’
    • ‘The bike was skidding sideways, and it slammed into the branch.’
    • ‘It is understood that the vehicle skidded after avoiding a car involved in another accident, mounted the verge and became impaled on a pole projecting from a crash barrier.’
    • ‘His bike skidded sideways and hit the road divider.’
    • ‘The vehicle skidded and collided with the interstate guard rail.’
    • ‘When the car skidded to a halt in front of the High School, her mother grabbed her wrist.’
    glide, move lightly, slide, sail, plane, scud, skate, float, coast
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    1. 1.1 Slip; slide.
      ‘Barbara's foot skidded and she fell to the floor’
      • ‘The runners slipped and skidded across the ice, screeching vociferously.’
      • ‘They all tried to halt quickly with their hands raised when they slipped and skidded on the floor.’
      • ‘Four steps from the bottom, my left foot skidded out from under me, and before I knew it, I was face down on the dressing room floor.’
      • ‘Begin your powder turn and then instead of hitting your edges hard to carve a turn, stand up on two feet and let your skis slide or skid diagonally across the fall line.’
      • ‘I lost my sword, and I fell over backwards, skidding on my shoulders.’
      • ‘One of the Cooper girls, Claire, goes skidding past us and slips.’
      • ‘His left foot skidded, and then he was tumbling.’
      • ‘Russ skidded as he fell again and slammed into a wall.’
      • ‘His expression then changed to one of surprise as his feet skidded out from under him and he landed next to her, flat on his face.’
      • ‘Her bare feet skidded and slid over the dirt, sandals long since broken in the fight.’
      • ‘As I went to fetch the ball, I slipped and went skidding on my hands and knees.’
      • ‘I skidded, slipped, cursed, crashed, and generally regressed one full level in ability.’
      • ‘Her feet skidded slightly as she tried to change her direction, nearly knocking her onto her back.’
      • ‘Realising that she had to get to the hospital she dashed across the muddy grass, her feet skidding on the dampness.’
      • ‘Jack's feet nearly skidded out from under him on the heavily polished wood floor.’
      • ‘His legs scraped against the brick wall of the house, shoes slipping and skidding as he scampered his way up and out.’
      • ‘The raider's feet skidded in mud as he tried to brake, but it was far too late.’
      • ‘I slipped and skidded as I made my way to my compartment.’
      • ‘I slip and slide and skid and bump into things even in the best of weather.’
      slide, skid, slither, glide
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    2. 1.2with object Cause to skid.
      ‘he skidded his car’
      • ‘Just two days after buying his car he skidded it on black ice on a major road and wrote it off.’
      • ‘Just as I began to think that Harvey would only stop when his car ran out of gas, the man skidded his car to a halt at the base of a building under construction.’
      • ‘Upon reaching the door Zeo skidded the car to a stop.’
      • ‘He skidded the car to a stop at her last words, and she flung herself out of the car and started making her way towards the brush.’
    3. 1.3North American with object Move a heavy object on skids.
      ‘they skidded the logs down the hill to the waterfront’
      • ‘When skidding logs back to roadside, Heisler is looking behind him about 90% of the time.’
      • ‘The horses also pull the farm's ‘truck,’ an antique box wagon, and skid logs for firewood out of the woods.’
      • ‘We would skid the logs to roadside with horses, and then they were hauled to the lake where they were boomed, and a tugboat would take them to the mill.’
  • 2with object Fasten a skid to (a wheel) as a brake.

noun

  • 1An act of skidding or sliding.

    ‘the Volvo went into a skid’
    • ‘Steer control induces a resistance in the steering, encouraging the driver to steer away from the resistance and so, out of the skid or slide.’
    • ‘The noise startled him, and he slid into a side skid.’
    • ‘We had some skids and accidents, but thankfully no injuries.’
    • ‘There will be skids and tumbles, but it is all part of the fun.’
    • ‘Substances such as diesel and liquid soap are poured on the road to facilitate skids, wheelspins, and other manoeuvres.’
    • ‘This feature enables the car to react in potentially dangerous situations more effectively and avoid skids.’
    • ‘He believed Mrs Letch probably tried to correct the skid but in doing so steered squarely into the path of the oncoming car.’
    • ‘The average skid resistance results are given in Figure 4.’
    • ‘All Crash's renowned moves have returned, including the spin attack, the body slam and the slide skid.’
    • ‘Previous to the traffic work, we'd occasionally hear a skid once a week or so, and now it's nearly a daily occurrence.’
    • ‘Similar studies to those in Holland were carried out in the United Kingdom and the results were used to develop a skid resistance specification based on investigatory levels.’
    • ‘The skid steering allows for on-the-spot-turning.’
    • ‘He cascaded down the hall, sliding on the damp ground and coming to a skid in front of a door.’
    • ‘Tasks during the series include reversing trailers, parallel parking, handling skids and reacting to people and objects on the road.’
    • ‘An undignified skid and a few slides later found him at the entrance to the parlor, where the voices had retreated to.’
    • ‘But when I tried to steer into the skid I oversteered and started going round the other way.’
    • ‘If you start to hydroplane, don't brake suddenly or turn the wheel, or you might spin into a skid.’
    • ‘You would think a couple of skids and spins would teach him, but no!’
    • ‘Ouellette and his team specialize in teaching drivers advanced techniques for handling such things as skids, blowouts, unusual weather and collision avoidance.’
    fit of rage, rage, fury, fit of bad temper, fit of ill temper, bad temper, tantrum, passion, paroxysm
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  • 2A runner attached to the underside of an aircraft for use when landing on snow or grass.

    • ‘I gently fed power to the hover coils and, as the SAP eased off the ground, retracted the landing skids.’
    • ‘A metre below the skids of the aircraft was the ledge onto which we were to leap, and below that was a sheer 100-metre drop into what from the air looked like an otherwise inaccessible canyon.’
    • ‘They reached the surface and extended their landing skids.’
    • ‘The shuttle's hatches slammed open before the landing skids even touched the ground.’
    • ‘Hovering only inches above the water, Sergeant Chip Sunier clambered out to the chopper's landing skids and plucked baby Alias to safety.’
    • ‘We taxied up to the head of the lake, turned around and roared back, but had to abort when we were three-quarters down the lake and our skids hadn't left the water.’
    • ‘The skids once again left the runway, allowing the tiny aircraft to bounce its way higher and higher into sustained forward flight.’
    1. 2.1North American Each of a set of wooden rollers used for moving a log or other heavy object.
      • ‘He constructed very long, rough wooden skids which he assembled into semi-geometric structures.’
      • ‘I put skids under it for ease of movement.’
      • ‘The lumber coming off the saw is bundled and tagged and stacked on a skid.’
      • ‘Unmarked crates, heavy machinery, and piles upon piles of empty skids filled the most of it.’
      • ‘Skid steer loaders are used to dig and move landscaping and building materials.’
  • 3A braking device consisting of a wooden or metal shoe preventing a wheel from revolving.

  • 4A beam or plank used to support a ship under construction or repair.

    • ‘It had a shorter hinged shoulder support plate and a skid type bipod.’
    • ‘Contrast that with a gas turbine, which is shipped on a skid and essentially needs only to be hooked up.’

Phrases

  • hit the skids

    • informal Begin a rapid decline or deterioration.

      • ‘I have been compulsively reading since the economy started hitting the skids 2 years ago.’
      • ‘The quality of your life really hits the skids.’
      • ‘Australian political history is littered with parties who've hit the skids once they're lost their charismatic leader.’
      • ‘Forgive me, readers; I don't know what sort of sound an acting career makes when it hits the skids.’
      • ‘She hits the skids and sees the folly in denying her love for an unsuitably poor lawyer.’
      • ‘Few pitchers have hit the skids as quickly as did Lima after great success.’
      • ‘His career was hitting the skids when he was commissioned to write a film of Edward Lear's life.’
      • ‘Workers will pay with their homes as well as their jobs when the economy hits the skids.’
      • ‘Private Eye has had a really interesting correspondence - telling a tale of an album released over a decade ago; it's a concept album about a rockstar whose career - forged in writing rock operas - hits the skids.’
      • ‘The last time they formed a government, Montreal hit the skids.’
      • ‘They are signs of the Japanese economy hitting the skids.’
      • ‘Some of the luster came off when the club hit the skids in December.’
      deteriorate, degenerate, decay, crumble, collapse, fail, fall, sink, slump, slip, slide, go downhill, worsen, get worse, go to rack and ruin, stagnate, atrophy, wither, weaken, fade, fade away, wane, ebb
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  • on the skids

    • informal (of a person or their career) in a bad state; failing.

      • ‘Dennis Hope, a formerly unemployed ventriloquist, was on the skids in 1980.’
      • ‘As Beck suggests, getting a chance is usually the most difficult hurdle on the path toward coming back for a player whose career has been on the skids.’
      • ‘It is not just newspaper circulation and fixed line phone calls which are on the skids in Australia, snail mail is also starting to contract at gathering speed.’
      • ‘Within 10 months, the internet firm was on the skids.’
      • ‘In the cartoon, Death goes on a mini-adventure that leads him to alcohol and love, ending with our poor skeleton friend living life on the skids.’
      • ‘So, one would assume that her international career is well and truly on the skids, Miles.’
      • ‘Why is our economic and emotional health on the skids?’
      • ‘Well you don't sense you're on the skids obviously.’
      • ‘By 1924, though, his career was long since on the skids, confined mostly to supervision of films.’
      • ‘If there is enough opposition, and if that opposition is sufficiently vociferous, then he is going to fear that his career is on the skids.’
  • put the skids under

    • informal Hasten the decline or failure of.

      • ‘Failure to reinvest or recapitalise ultimately put the skids under the whole thing.’
      • ‘Id urge swift action on this issue before local people put the skids under the authorities in the courts.’
      • ‘Alan Curbishley today called on his players to stand up and be counted after last week's humiliating defeat against Leeds United has put the skids under their European aspirations.’
      • ‘Council officials have put the skids under plans for a skateboard area because its location is on the wrong side of a line by 100 feet.’
      • ‘US scientists are working on a high-tech solution to crowd control which will literally put the skids under enemy forces and disorderly civilians.’
      • ‘Harrogate will be looking to put the skids under National League Two leaders Sedgeley Park at Claro Road tomorrow.’
      • ‘The win was all the more laudable considering Kiltaine had been hitherto unbeaten but the Sarsfields put the skids under them with a gutsy super display.’
      destroy, ruin, wreck, put an end to, be the ruin of, be the ruination of, wreak havoc on, demolish, devastate, blast, blight, smash, shatter, dash, torpedo, scotch, sabotage
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Origin

Late 17th century (as a noun in the sense ‘supporting beam’): perhaps related to Old Norse skíth (see ski).

Pronunciation

skid

/skɪd//skid/