Definition of skeptic in English:

skeptic

(British sceptic)

noun

  • 1A person inclined to question or doubt all accepted opinions.

    • ‘Even the sceptics who had questioned the wisdom of spending 800 million euros to build and upgrade stadia, joined the party mood.’
    • ‘Once again, the people proved all the skeptics, all the doubters, all the detractors, wrong, that democracy can work in this part of the world.’
    • ‘He is rather like me, a true skeptic whose passion for questioning emotionally held beliefs and outspokenness makes him many dangerous enemies.’
    • ‘Nevertheless, the first woman literary critic of Malayalam proved her critics and sceptics wrong.’
    • ‘Good journalists should be outsiders, questioners, sceptics, empathisers.’
    • ‘He was different from the other skeptic that had questioned her before.’
    • ‘Indeed, all progress depends on the sceptic, the questioner, the person who does not wholly conform.’
    • ‘Little said skeptics have questioned the science of the project since the beginning.’
    • ‘Mack continued to write about his meetings with abductees and also to endure bitter criticism and abuse from full-time UFO sceptics..’
    • ‘How does he gain by fortressing himself and his administration away from critics, skeptics, and questioners?’
    • ‘Already skeptics are questioning whether the initial budget for the space plan is sufficient.’
    • ‘The couple announced their romance in Italy earlier this month, prompting sceptics to question the validity of the match.’
    • ‘He accepts there remain sceptics and doubters concerning the present Dublin side.’
    • ‘And among the administration's critics and war skeptics, this Senator is front and center.’
    • ‘I'm not giving in to the sceptics and critics.’
    • ‘Lieberman has drawn so much praise, in fact, that some skeptics are questioning whether the media are getting carried away.’
    • ‘I have no doubt that there are many sceptics who will describe this vision as a pipe-dream.’
    • ‘Cynics and sceptics raised uncomfortable questions, and found serious flaws with the script.’
    • ‘Some sceptics even question the statistical findings of the Central Statistics Office.’
    • ‘At first, the idea of bringing the Internet to print received much criticism from skeptics.’
    cynic, doubter, questioner, scoffer
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A person who doubts the truth of Christianity and other religions; an atheist or agnostic.
      • ‘The most die-hard atheist or skeptic may suddenly find God when faced with an extreme suffering or danger.’
      • ‘The sceptic's caricature that Noah had fish tanks on the ark is wrong.’
      • ‘It is not aimed at the total sceptic, but rather the serious seeker.’
      • ‘We all know that the film is being turned into a movie, to satisfy all the religious sceptics who can't actually read.’
      • ‘The inevitable convergence of such findings with religion makes it impossible for a sceptic, atheist and man of science to swallow such phenomena.’
      • ‘Some of the food laws have been attacked by sceptics as ‘proof’ that the Bible makes mistakes, meaning it could not be God's written word.’
      • ‘On the contrary, he bracketed sceptics with atheists and free thinkers as the adversaries whom his system was meant to frustrate.’
      • ‘A skeptic might say that you're just asking them to package their positions into more religious language.’
      • ‘But, I was not a sceptic but rather a true believer in God.’
      • ‘Some skeptics also tend to lump all forms of religion in with irrationalism and superstition.’
      • ‘Rather than continually confront the skeptics and critics, he chose to withdraw periodically to spend time in prayer with his Father.’
      • ‘The main reason skeptics reject the Biblical account is the work of British archaeologist Kathleen Kenyon, who excavated the area in the 1950s.’
      • ‘Ordinary skeptics may be atheists and be completely unaware of the arguments of theological skepticism.’
      • ‘He is now an atheist and skeptic - although I fear he'll fall back into faith someday, given how sad he seems to find the idea of no afterlife.’
      • ‘Plimer has made something of a career out of baiting Christians, though his antics have proved an embarrassment even to some of his fellow sceptics.’
      • ‘But in general, I think we do ourselves a disservice as skeptics if we try to maintain that the only ‘pure’ skeptic is an atheist skeptic.’
      • ‘Most people do not attend church, but they do not call themselves atheists or skeptics.’
      • ‘A religious sceptic, and by nature a conciliator, Orléans sought a compromise.’
      • ‘Merchants, far from being sceptics, were often the agents of religious fervour and proselytism on the shifting trade routes between civilisations.’
      • ‘That conclusion is fine by me, because I'm a religious skeptic.’
  • 2Philosophy
    An ancient or modern philosopher who denies the possibility of knowledge, or even rational belief, in some sphere.

    • ‘Such a skeptic denies we could know most of the things we take ourselves to know, because we cannot rule out the logical possibility that we are massively deceived about the world.’
    • ‘In antiquity, sceptics attacked the possibility of knowledge, but still needed to give some account of how they regulated their lives and opinions.’
    • ‘Xenophanes was a sceptic who denied that knowledge could be obtained by us humans; at best we merely have beliefs, the truth or falsity of which will remain largely unknown to us.’
    • ‘Ancient sceptics are uninterested in carving out a position within philosophy; they think that philosophical reason will always undermine itself.’
    • ‘Rather they had never been skeptics because they had never meant to deny the possibility of knowledge.’

adjective

Origin

Late 16th century ( skeptic): from French sceptique, or via Latin from Greek skeptikos, from skepsis inquiry, doubt.

Pronunciation:

skeptic

/ˈskeptik/