Definition of sincere in English:

sincere

adjective

  • 1Free from pretense or deceit; proceeding from genuine feelings.

    ‘they offer their sincere thanks to Paul’
    • ‘Although it was sincere, such a policy is not sustainable in the end.’
    • ‘The truth was more that the agenda didn't fit with her sincere and earnest style, so why should she change in order to fit it?’
    • ‘Your feeling for this person would therefore be very real and very sincere.’
    • ‘Suddenly you're not even trying to paint on a smile that's not sincere.’
    • ‘The way he captured Donald's sincere love, admiration, and envy for his brother was remarkable.’
    • ‘The committee wishes to express sincere thanks to all those who supported it and donated prizes.’
    • ‘Let's have a real, sincere dialogue on that issue and then try to move forward together.’
    • ‘As far as this is concerned, there was no distortion of facts, but only a sincere statement of their observations.’
    • ‘The club has extended a sincere thanks to all that support the weekly lotto.’
    • ‘No political entity should object to the sincere efforts to improve the city in even the smallest way.’
    • ‘Wouldn't a prayer or period of quiet reflection be more genuine and sincere?’
    • ‘I would like to offer my sincere apologies to you if you have wrongly received a reminder about your council tax in the last week.’
    • ‘To all the family and relations deepest and sincere sympathy is extended on this very sad occasion.’
    • ‘He created an absurd and funny universe that, though ridiculous, always seemed real and sincere.’
    • ‘Hence, we try to make our supplication sincere, free of any thoughts that may not please God.’
    • ‘What has he got to show us for all his well-hidden, but undoubtedly sincere, concern?’
    • ‘The painting also feels achingly sincere, while also appearing a little awkward.’
    • ‘The sincere and succinct work has won a multitude of readers and gained the applause of local critics.’
    • ‘Our apologies that this letter is of a general nature, but the gratitude and thanks are nonetheless just as sincere.’
    • ‘They have a sincere and deep conviction about the license of free speech.’
    honest, genuine, truthful, unhypocritical, meaning what one says, straightforward, direct, frank, candid
    heartfelt, wholehearted, profound, deep, from the heart
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of a person) saying what they genuinely feel or believe; not dishonest or hypocritical.
      • ‘Be sincere and careful not to make it sound as if you are moaning.’
      • ‘We respect your willingness to debate with us, and we believe that you are sincere in your arguments.’
      • ‘The German political elite was sincere in renouncing German nationalism.’
      • ‘Saved by Mary and taken under her wing, they benefited from the love and education of a sincere and intelligent woman.’
      • ‘If they were sincere they would open the entire process of the city budget allocation to the public.’
      • ‘If teachers are sincere, they sometimes request their relatives to chip in and take a class or two.’
      • ‘He is being sincere, even if he's not always completely honest with his intentions.’
      • ‘What made it worse was that I couldn't even be sure he was sincere in suggesting we stood out as a nation of bookkeepers.’
      • ‘I mean a more subtle form which is displayed by even the most well meaning and sincere people.’
      • ‘Even when converts appear genuine and sincere, it's still a difficult concept to take seriously.’
      • ‘I cannot discern anything tricksy in his demeanour, I really do believe that he is sincere.’
      • ‘In his contact with people he was sincere and forthright, and always generous and ready to help in a practical way.’
      • ‘If the parents are honest and sincere, the teenager will feel obligated to adhere to such values.’
      • ‘Many are run by sincere people who genuinely believe what they teach.’
      • ‘Whilst most of these champions are articulate and sincere, they are also human, and therefore flawed.’
      • ‘A sincere man, he says integrity makes sense from a business point of view.’
      • ‘Denis was one of nature's true gentlemen, quiet and sincere and a wonderful family man.’
      • ‘I've no doubt they were sincere and am sure they don't want mass starvation.’
      • ‘Karen had promised, and her palpable disappointment had given him reason to believe she was sincere.’
      • ‘This suggests to us that journalists are indeed sincere in their belief that they are free and independent.’

Origin

Mid 16th century (also in the sense not falsified, unadulterated): from Latin sincerus clean, pure.

Pronunciation

sincere

/sinˈsir/