Definition of since in US English:

since

conjunction, adverb, & preposition

  • 1In the intervening period between (the time mentioned) and the time under consideration, typically the present.

    as preposition ‘she has suffered from depression since she was sixteen’
    ‘the worst property slump since the war’
    as conjunction ‘I've felt better since I've been here’
    as adverb ‘she ran away on Friday and we haven't seen her since’
    • ‘Too much has happened in the period since.’
    • ‘My focus since then has been on removing this sort of conditioning from everyone.’
    • ‘That was a few months ago and I've put a lot of work in since then so it should be stronger.’
    • ‘Workers say since then managers have been asking them to go home during quieter periods.’
    • ‘For that reason clarinets have been built since their early days in different keys.’
    • ‘I want to get back in the ring because it feels such a long time since the last fight.’
    • ‘All the things that have happened to me since that depressing period of my life!’
    • ‘It has been some time since anyone had to fight their way into a London saleroom.’
    • ‘Things may have picked up for Celtic since then but I see no reason to change my advice.’
    • ‘It meant that no party had overall control for the first time since the Second World War.’
    • ‘It is now one year since Douglas died and for some reason it still feels like there's a hole in the world.’
    • ‘The property had been empty since last July but a couple of weeks ago his daughter moved in.’
    • ‘I booked him for an exhibition immediately and he has been here regularly since then.’
    • ‘It could quite literally be the biggest thing to hit the resort since the war itself.’
    • ‘Well, maybe not entirely, but life has been in a slump since I tied the knot this summer.’
    • ‘It is hard to believe that a year has passed since then and it is a significant milestone in her fight for life.’
    • ‘So I put on makeup for the first time since that fight at lunch that started all this.’
    • ‘It was the British who suffered the worst single incident since the end of the war.’
    • ‘It is the first rise since property prices began spiralling in York in the last two to three years.’
    • ‘They are on a mission, a task that they have been training for since they entered the Army.’
    because, since, seeing that, seeing as, considering that, on account of the fact that, in view of the fact that, owing to the fact that
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  • 2conjunction For the reason that; because.

    ‘delegates were delighted, since better protection of rhino reserves will help protect other rare species’
    • ‘They certainly knew that their task was hard since two previous attempts had failed.’
    • ‘Many more elsewhere are struggling since visitors found a reason to stay at home.’
    • ‘I was brought in the same room as Raine, since the doctors had mentioned this was the only room left.’
    • ‘She was right to ditch the passage since it would have jarred with the spirit of reasoned debate.’
    since, as, for the reason that, in view of the fact that, owing to the fact that, seeing as, seeing that
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  • 3adverb Ago.

    ‘the settlement had vanished long since’
    • ‘The government has long since given up trying to reduce the propensity to commit crime.’
    • ‘Other cabins and superstructure have long since rotted and crumpled to the seabed.’
    • ‘That fabric has long since been sundered and social anarchy has been the consequence.’
    • ‘Many features shown are long since gone, but the maps aim to ensure they are not forgotten.’
    • ‘Wales had long since been conquered, but it was still very much alive as a country.’
    • ‘The sun had long since risen, not that you could tell it from the ominous clouds outside.’
    • ‘The lights had long since gone out, leaving the room darkened enough that he could hide.’
    • ‘Presumably it's a joke, but taken to such an extent that it's long since ceased to be one.’
    • ‘Mitchell had matured and quieted much by then and had long since left her flapper days behind.’
    • ‘Her cards were face up in front of her and she had long since lost count of whose turn it was.’
    • ‘The banks will reclaim the funds from the retailer, but the goods have long since gone.’
    • ‘Practice has long since taken its leave of policy, and speaks to it about once a year, on a bad line.’
    • ‘The sun had long since faded by this time and the sky was growing darker by the minute.’
    • ‘I am sure there would have been mad ones then, too, but they are long since forgotten.’
    • ‘The romance has long since expired like the first red rose he bought you to proclaim his love.’
    • ‘The guards behind her had long since left and Ashley stared at the entrance with longing.’
    • ‘My father who started the business has long since given up trying to make me like him.’
    • ‘Tunisia put the ball in Spain's net, but the whistle had long since gone for offside.’
    • ‘The club's long since gone but the memories of those starry nights have never faded.’
    • ‘They have long since ceased to be amazed at the number of shopping trolleys they find.’
    in the past, before the present, before, earlier, back, in time gone by, since, formerly, previously
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Usage

When using since as a causal conjunction to mean ‘because’ or ‘given that,’ be aware that in some contexts or constructions the word may be construed as referring to time. For example, in the sentence, Since Mrs. Jefferson moved to Baltimore in the 1990s, she was not aware of the underlying complexities, it is not clear, especially at the beginning, whether since means ‘because’ or ‘from the time when.’ It is often better to simply say ‘because,’ if that is the intended meaning

Origin

Late Middle English: contraction of obsolete sithence, or from dialect sin (both from dialect sithen ‘thereupon, afterward, ever since’).

Pronunciation

since

/sɪns//sins/