Definition of side in English:

side

noun

  • 1A position to the left or right of an object, place, or central point.

    ‘a town on the other side of the river’
    ‘on either side of the entrance was a garden’
    ‘Rachel tilted her head to one side’
    • ‘She slowly tipped her head to the side as she positioned her mouth over his bottom lip.’
    • ‘Your arms should be directly in front of your body or slightly out to the sides in the start position.’
    • ‘The interior of the tower is now dry and a vast and fully lit undercroft spreads out on both sides of the early river gateway to the fortress.’
    • ‘I have been told that some people on the other side of the river complain about noise and anti-social habits.’
    • ‘The policemen had taken up battle positions on the other side of the gate.’
    • ‘The Dutch built military facilities and trade offices on both sides of the river.’
    • ‘The streets were more deserted than ever but a few Iraqis were queuing on both sides of the Tigris River waiting for buses.’
    • ‘There was only one guard positioned on the other side of the doors, and he was walking away from her.’
    • ‘What is missed by non-Londoners is that Waterloo and St Pancras may be only a few miles apart, but they are on different sides of the river.’
    • ‘The estimates meeting takes place before Christmas but that is also a time when young people gather in the pubs and clubs on both sides of the river.’
    • ‘From the French windows of my room on the 14th floor, both sides of the river were clearly in view.’
    • ‘Cultivated fields stretch for kilometres along both sides of the river.’
    • ‘As he is well aware, ambushes most always occurred from both sides of a river or canal simultaneously.’
    • ‘The man then sat down across the table from him and folded his arms on the desk as the guards took up positions at the sides of the door.’
    • ‘He said it would have been difficult if not impossible for the deceased to tie the knot in the position found at the side of the beam.’
    • ‘Adam parked on the other side of the driveway near the barn and shut off the engine.’
    • ‘The study is looking at where the ends of the bridge would be put on both sides of the river.’
    • ‘We were walking along the Thames Path, on the other side of the river.’
    • ‘The purpose, as I see it, is to trap garbage which will flow to the side naturally as the river flows to the sea.’
    • ‘To see how radically that has changed, just look at both sides of the river today.’
    1. 1.1 Either of the two halves of an object, surface, or place regarded as divided by an imaginary central line.
      ‘she lay on her side of the bed’
      ‘the left side of the brain’
      • ‘Cut off the arms and neck hole and divide the two sides in two to make four dusters: dampen them slightly and they work a treat without the use of polish.’
      • ‘The heart is a muscular pump divided into two sides.’
      • ‘The headache then usually spreads up the back of the neck typically affecting one side of the head.’
      • ‘Well a syrinx has two passages, divided into two sides, so birds can make two sounds at once.’
      • ‘This is an opening in the central wall of the heart that divides the right side from the left.’
      half, part
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 The right or the left part of a person's or animal's body, especially of the human torso.
      ‘he has been paralyzed on his right side since birth’
      • ‘Lukas has a condition called Hemiplegia, a form of cerebral palsy that only affects the right side of his body.’
      • ‘A stroke had left him partially paralysed down one side and had affected his speech.’
      • ‘Nurses turned my body slowly on its side, so I could sleep and get feeling back in my legs.’
      • ‘Position them on their sides to prevent them from choking on vomitus.’
      • ‘They keep me even on both sides of my body, and I can stand up without falling backwards or tipping too far forwards.’
      • ‘I was lying on my side on two sheets of newspaper spread on the cement floor.’
      • ‘The freak accident, which the family maintains was an act of God, left her unable to speak and paralysed down one side.’
      • ‘He shifted his position to his side while focusing on the silent sleeper next to him.’
      • ‘The first man received nine stab wounds to his chest and the left-hand side of his body.’
      • ‘The stroke badly affected Mr Scantlebury's right side and ability to read and stand.’
      • ‘Her mind went blank but the next thing she could remember was the man standing over her, putting a knife into the right side of her body.’
    3. 1.3[in singular] A place or position closely adjacent to someone.
      ‘his wife stood at his side’
      • ‘She frowned at her creation as it faded from the glass then returned to her mother's side.’
      • ‘He slipped away from my mother's side, tiptoed across the room and made himself a cup of tea.’
      • ‘Pen smiled as her mother rushed to her side and gave her a light but intense hug.’
      • ‘Police are hunting a man who tried to snatch a three-year-old boy as he walked by his mother's side.’
      • ‘At his side were the remains of his parents, the King and Queen of Novena.’
      • ‘They come in all shapes and sizes, they stand alert by one's side when not required and they have to be carried on escalators.’
      • ‘Julie walked up to her mother's side and brushed a piece of hair out of her face.’
      • ‘It was always a pleasure to have Raj by one's side when major neck surgery was required.’
      • ‘I flushed at the childish nickname, but crossed the room quickly to my mother's side.’
      • ‘His father, closest to him, grabbed the child while his mother raced to his side.’
      • ‘I turned to see one of my neighbors had came to my side.’
      • ‘At my side was another sick kid, a little boy who was sort of the poster child for the hospital.’
      • ‘Tenderly lifting her, he carried her back to the cave and placed her by her mother's side.’
    4. 1.4 Either of the lateral halves of the body of a butchered animal, or an animal prepared for eating.
      ‘a side of beef’
      • ‘A side of pork or beef was cooked slowly in it, with new stones added throughout the cooking.’
      • ‘Murdoch arrived just a little bit later driving a wagon laden with sides of beef and pork for the barbecue.’
      • ‘Mounds of oysters, long sides of smoked salmon and busy chefs cooking right in front of you are assurance enough of simple stuff done well.’
      • ‘Preserved pork, including sides salted to make bacon, held a place of primary importance in the British diet in past centuries.’
  • 2An upright or sloping surface of a structure or object that is not the top or bottom and generally not the front or back.

    ‘a car crashed into the side of the house’
    ‘line the sides of the cake pan’
    [as modifier] ‘a side entrance’
    • ‘There is a side entrance from the front of the house into the kitchen pantry area.’
    • ‘Turn it over and look at the top, front, back, sides and bottom.’
    • ‘One resident said that it felt like a lorry had crashed into the side of his house.’
    • ‘Pour enough chocolate gelée to come half way up the sides of the prepared mold.’
    • ‘The attic was musty, wooden, with a low ceiling that reached its peak at the center and sloped gently toward the sides.’
    • ‘It was around twenty feet long and ten feet wide, with the sides sloping down to a little clear ground in the middle.’
    • ‘Sometimes they are built along the sides of steep slopes with varying amounts of exposure.’
    • ‘The side windows in the front come down far enough so I can see my dozer and what is in front of my front wheels.’
    • ‘Customer logos can be embroidered on the front, sides, or rear of the cap.’
    • ‘Officers clad in body amour burst in through its front and side entrances and held all customers and staff inside.’
    • ‘The house has a side entrance, large garden to the rear and off street parking.’
    • ‘The lights are positioned on the sides and back of the black box and periodically shone directly into my eyes.’
    • ‘Unless the tin has a non-stick surface, lightly grease the sides and line the bottom with baking paper.’
    • ‘Pour enough hot water into the pan to come half way up the sides of the ramekins.’
    • ‘It is spacious and bright, with windows looking onto the front and the side of the house.’
    • ‘Grease the sides and line the bottom of a 20 cm square cake tin.’
    • ‘It is located within a cluster of houses and has a side entrance and an extensive rear garden.’
    • ‘Something came right across my front windscreen and my side window was also hit.’
    • ‘The side needs to be positioned so that the other end of the angle bracket is on the stud.’
    • ‘They riddled it from the front and on both sides with more than 100 bullets, killing the driver.’
    1. 2.1 Each of the flat surfaces of a solid object.
      • ‘The album cover can only have been designed, and approved, by someone who owns dice with more than six sides.’
      • ‘Cuboid cores are prepared blocky-like cubes of chert, with blades often produced on six sides.’
      • ‘However, some have pointed out that many crystals have six sides rather than four.’
    2. 2.2 Either of the two surfaces of something flat and thin, such as paper or cloth.
      • ‘Dip one side of the rice paper into the water and hold it for five seconds.’
      • ‘Depending on the paper, some people have it on both sides of the comb.’
      • ‘Use both sides of printer paper, whether it is to run through the printer again, or other purposes.’
      • ‘Fusco even used both sides of the paper, turning the sheet as he was drawing.’
      • ‘Encouraged, though shy, Moon started using both sides of the paper.’
      • ‘Reasons must be given in writing for the nomination on no more than one side of A4 paper.’
      • ‘Fifteen minutes elapse before he finishes reading both sides of the letter-sized paper.’
      • ‘Duplex simply means printing on both sides of the paper and it is recommended both for environmental and cost reasons.’
      • ‘I suppose they must have extra copies for when different articles of interest appear on both sides of a page.’
      • ‘Michelangelo also traced the figure of Tityus on the other side of the paper.’
      • ‘That means the printer is able to print on both sides of the paper.’
      • ‘Staff and children alike reused paper, photocopied on both sides and shredded waste paper.’
      • ‘It seems incredible that it took so long for printers to be built with the capacity to print on both sides of paper.’
      • ‘The newspaper press has a number of printing units which are able to print on both sides of the paper at the same time, some in colour.’
      • ‘Most campus printers are way cheaper when you use both sides of the paper.’
      • ‘The waxed side of the paper made it hard to keep the folds, but we got a lot of enjoyment out of trying to make the things fly.’
      surface, face, plane, part, facet, aspect, facade
      View synonyms
    3. 2.3 The amount of writing needed to fill one side of a sheet of paper.
      ‘she told us not to write more than three sides’
      • ‘I usually end up with at least 3 sides of A4 paper.’
      • ‘Remember also that all this may take some time, and involve reading several sides of A4 paper.’
      • ‘As a result, a typical Saturday ‘would result in thirty sides of notes handwritten on A4 paper’.’
      • ‘Neither is much longer than two sides of a single sheet of paper.’
      • ‘The wine list is two sides of an A4 sheet with no room for showing off, and seems very intelligently chosen.’
      • ‘If the contrary science were reported in such a way, the resultant report would be less than a side of A4 paper.’
    4. 2.4 Either of the two faces of a record or of the two separate tracks on a length of recording tape.
      • ‘You requested three or four numbers, so I have filled up one side of a cassette tape.’
      • ‘Reliably, however, she woke up each time it was time to change sides on the tape.’
      • ‘It just happened to be on the other side of the tape that had a Brian May album on.’
      • ‘There are six tracks split over two sides of vinyl, featuring daytime recording on one side and night-time workouts on the flip.’
  • 3A part or region near the edge and away from the middle of something.

    ‘a minivan was parked at the side of the road’
    ‘cabins on the south side of the clearing’
    • ‘The coach had been parked at the side of the road by the driver who was planning to collect it the next morning.’
    • ‘Instead, Mowat was forced to lie at the side of the river in agony until the emergency services arrived.’
    • ‘We parked at the side of the road and crossed over to look out from the, ahem, vista point.’
    • ‘There is enough room for a person to tiptoe through but not enough for more than one foot at a time on the sides near the railings.’
    • ‘She looked up at her surroundings, surprised to note that she was near the side of a road.’
    • ‘The Audi saloon was parked at the side of the road when it was hit by the Toyota.’
    • ‘I saw a crowd of about 40 shocked and terrified people along the south side of the car park, trying to get away.’
    • ‘The Evening Press reported how a van driver had come across the woman slumped in an armchair at the side of the road near shops.’
    • ‘Panca added that there was also two other men on another motorcycle parked at the side of the road.’
    • ‘Perks did the same to every member of the team before taking his position at the side of the track.’
    • ‘Freeman drives a Jaguar with a personalised number plate and has a flat in a plush area in the south side of Glasgow.’
    • ‘The two cars, a Volvo and a Metro, had been parked safely at the side of the road outside his home in Foxwood Lane, York.’
    edge, border, verge, boundary, margin, fringe, fringes, flank, brink, bank, brim, rim, lip, perimeter, circumference, extremity, periphery, limit, outer limit, limits, bound, bounds
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1[as modifier] Subsidiary to or less important than something.
      ‘a side dish of fresh vegetables’
      • ‘The side dish had enough to feed two, let alone garnish a single plate.’
      • ‘The Rib Tickler is a pork or beef rib dinner for four, complete with side dishes.’
      • ‘Generally, side dishes serve to add flavor to the rice rather than provide nutrients.’
      • ‘You could serve it as a side dish, on its own with a salad, or as part of buffet spread.’
      • ‘Flat bread is a great side dish for dipping in and soaking up those sauces.’
      • ‘There is a good choice of soups, salads, side dishes and fine vegetarian dishes.’
      • ‘We also chose a side dish of beancurd and vegetables in a sweet and sour sauce.’
      • ‘You don't really need these side dishes, though, especially if you get an appetizer.’
      • ‘I suppose only working for 24 hours out of a year leaves him a lot time to run side businesses.’
      • ‘The Big Top, thankfully, is up already: but a host of side tents are still being assembled.’
      • ‘After just the right wait, they arrived, each accompanied by a side dish of steamed vegetables.’
      • ‘Our meat fondue came with our choice of side dish, Caesar salad, rice pilaf and a baguette.’
      • ‘There are plenty of side quests that don't feel tacked on or completely irrelevant to the main goal.’
      • ‘You can even boil the greens just as you would spinach and serve as a side dish with ham.’
      • ‘This is a simple recipe which goes down well as a crunchy starter or as a side dish.’
      • ‘There are also numerous side events for both the children and adults to add to the enjoyment.’
      • ‘The chefs had 60 minutes to prepare and cook one main curry dish and one side dish with rice or bread.’
      • ‘The meals are typically served with salads, rice and other side orders.’
      • ‘You should now be in possession of the revised amendment of the conditions and side letter following our meeting.’
      • ‘I found the large salad a bit small for a meal, but it's the perfect size for two to share as a side dish.’
      subordinate, lesser, lower, lower-level, secondary, minor, peripheral, incidental, tangential, marginal, ancillary, subsidiary, subservient, non-essential, inessential, immaterial, borderline, irrelevant, beside the point, of little account, extraneous, unimportant, less important
      View synonyms
    2. 3.2North American A dish served as subsidiary to the main one.
      ‘sides of German potato salad and red cabbage’
      • ‘This would make a great side with fish for instance, or can be served as a main dish.’
      • ‘The potatoes and shallots were excellent sides, sweet and soft and flavorful.’
    3. 3.3 Each of the lines forming the boundary of a plane rectilinear figure.
      ‘the farm buildings formed three sides of a square’
      • ‘The word ‘scalene’ is used to describe a triangle with sides of unequal lengths.’
      • ‘The first day of school, she told me that I must be pretty stupid if I didn't know a hexagon had six sides.’
      • ‘For purposes of clarification: a hexagon is a polygon with six sides and six angles.’
      • ‘As the number of a polygon's sides increases, these catenary segments get shorter and flatter.’
      • ‘One way to draw this is to start with an equilateral triangle, which has three sides of equal length.’
      • ‘In plan the house is a long thin strip around three sides of an octagon.’
      • ‘For example he showed that among polygons with equal perimeter and an equal number of sides, the regular polygon has the greatest area.’
      • ‘All the squares and all the rectangles have sides which are Fibonacci numbers in length.’
      • ‘He gives the example of the exercise of trying to draw a seven-sided figure with equal sides, using only a ruler and compass.’
      • ‘This describes the special relationship between the lengths of the sides of right-angle triangles.’
      • ‘How much more sacred than our triangle would be a square, a pentagon, a decagon, a figure with a hundred sides?’
      • ‘A Pythagoras tiling covers the plane with periodic copies of the squares on the sides of the right triangle.’
      • ‘The lines midway between parallel sides of the hexagon also form a triangle.’
      • ‘The cathedral stands on one side of a historic square with government buildings lining the other sides.’
      • ‘Several inns lined the south side of the square and large residences covered the east and west sides.’
      • ‘Albert Square E15 isn't so much a square as two sides of a rectangle.’
  • 4A person or group opposing another or others in a dispute, contest, or debate.

    ‘the two sides agreed to resume border trade’
    ‘whose side are you on?’
    • ‘In this debate the opposing sides rarely address the other's best arguments.’
    • ‘Delegates from two African countries fighting on opposing sides of a bloody war are this week expected to attend an arms fair hosted by the Government.’
    • ‘I think that both sides have enunciated their positions clearly.’
    • ‘By day five of the uprising, both sides had stabilised their positions.’
    • ‘By the time of the return trip, the two sides may be in position to make further progress.’
    • ‘This decision has annoyed people from both sides of the debate.’
    • ‘In this particular exercise we see lawyers from both sides arguing mutually exclusive positions.’
    • ‘Both sides took extreme positions, leaving plenty of room for negotiations in the weeks to come.’
    • ‘The two sides clashed at opposing protests in London Tuesday as the British parliament was in session.’
    • ‘There is virtually no common ground between the two opposing sides in the debate over the Constitutional Reform Bill.’
    • ‘The investigating committee was struck by the entrenchment of both sides in their positions over time.’
    • ‘Yesterday, factions involved with both sides in the dispute became embroiled in violent scuffles outside the court.’
    • ‘We will talk to two congressmen on opposing sides of this issue next.’
    • ‘In genuine dialogue both sides have positions at risk.’
    • ‘It is generally agreed, by all sides of the debate on this matter, that the legislation itself is out of date and needs reform.’
    • ‘All we did in that discussion was to reaffirm the positions that both sides took at the six-party talks last week.’
    • ‘What actually happened that night is disputed by both sides.’
    • ‘However, it was agreed by both sides that the position of the wife is dependent on that of the applicant.’
    • ‘There was concern that the opposing sides in the funeral dispute might travel to the hospital for the remains.’
    • ‘Indeed, what is most troubling is that both sides to the dispute have cynically resorted to the rule of law only when it suited them.’
    faction, camp, bloc, clique, caucus, entente, axis, ring, party, wing, splinter group, sect, clan, set
    View synonyms
    1. 4.1British A sports team.
      • ‘His hunger to get on the ball, to take on his old team, kept his side going and the goal then changed the balance.’
      • ‘In Mediterranean conditions players of both sides contributed to a thrilling encounter.’
      • ‘Credit must go to all the players from both sides for a competitive game that never boiled over the limits.’
      • ‘This should be one of the closest and most professional games of the round as the two sides try to position themselves for a home semi final.’
      • ‘Colin Hendry's side are hoping to erase memories of a tame defeat at Torquay last weekend.’
      • ‘I know many sides in the Premier league would be happy to be in seventh place, but we should be higher.’
      • ‘The win was particularly sweet as it was achieved without two of the side's leading players.’
      • ‘Jol shaped a good side from a young squad last season and started to get results.’
      • ‘To be honest, they were our preferred opponents out of the four sides in the play-offs.’
      • ‘Both the Australia rugby league and rugby union sides are thinking of cancelling tours to this country.’
      • ‘Previous England rugby sides, and England teams in many other sports, would have crumbled under the weight of such errors.’
      • ‘Both sides had pressure positions late on but the Scots held on for a 13-11 win.’
      • ‘Each side exchanged scores with only two points dividing the sides at half time.’
      • ‘They'll face better sides than this Monaco team, but you can only beat what's put in front of you.’
      • ‘Take any of these players out of the side and they are a different proposition.’
      • ‘This was a good game to watch with the players on both sides taking credit.’
      • ‘Given his side's position in the relative comfort zone of fifth place, this appeared almost paranoid.’
      • ‘Players on both sides insist they played hard even when nothing was at stake.’
      • ‘Overall it was a battling team performance from both sides with the man of the match award going to Liam Chipman.’
      • ‘It was quite upsetting for the rest of the players, from both sides, and very stressful.’
      team, squad, line-up, crew
      View synonyms
    2. 4.2 The position, interests, or attitude of one person or group, especially when regarded as being in opposition to another or others.
      ‘Mrs. Burt hasn't kept her side of the bargain’
      ‘the conservationists are on the city's side of the case’
      • ‘I have heard both sides of the argument about money and Pagan spirituality.’
      • ‘Similarities also exist between the left and the interests on the other side of the issue.’
      • ‘Here, the Daily Echo presents views from both sides of the argument.’
      • ‘It is a coincidence that we should now be hearing their side of the argument, but it is highly relevant.’
      • ‘On Monday a planning inspector heard both sides of the argument before visiting the site.’
      • ‘Their aim is to provide a neutral space to enable people to hear all sides of the argument on Europe and to have their say, in their own areas.’
      • ‘Well even though I was brought up in the city for part of my life I moved to the country at a fairly young age so I have heard both sides of the arguments to this topic!’
      • ‘I am in the unenviable position of understanding both sides of the issue perfectly.’
      • ‘The public deserve to hear both sides of the argument because this is the single most important decision to face this country.’
      • ‘She is a much needed conservative voice in an often liberal media, and will fight to have both sides of every argument heard.’
      • ‘Councils should be challenged to pay for tenants to attend so they can hear both sides of this argument.’
      • ‘We have worked alongside local tenant groups to make sure that people hear both sides of the argument, and to encourage them to vote no.’
      • ‘He was also critical of the police, alleging they were not interested in investigating his side of the story.’
      • ‘It is interesting that the opposition to the bill fell on both sides of that argument.’
      • ‘I put it up there out of respect for his place in blogging and in the interests of having both sides of the political spectrum represented.’
      • ‘I was in disbelief at how these public officials weren't interested in hearing the other side.’
      • ‘I quite like listening to him because I like to hear both sides of an argument.’
      point of view, viewpoint, view, perspective, opinion, way of thinking, mind, standpoint, stance, stand, position, attitude, posture, outlook, frame of reference, slant, aspect, angle, facet
      View synonyms
    3. 4.3 A particular aspect of something, especially a situation or a person's character.
      ‘her ability to put up with his disagreeable side’
      • ‘The negative side of this aspect is that self-indulgence may cause physical problems.’
      • ‘His delivery and facial expressions expose the many sides of his character and even hint at his own hypocrisy.’
      • ‘It's the closest we get to seeing the more vulnerable side of her.’
      • ‘There are some rather unexpected sides to Freer's character.’
      • ‘So we've focused on the humour and the human side of politicians themselves.’
      • ‘His newly-found sensitive side is winning him lots of affection from both the housemates and the public.’
      • ‘It is easy to say that your job isn't you and that you've got other sides to your character.’
      • ‘You can only see the funny side in a situation like this; both he and Louise certainly did.’
      • ‘As with every debate, a moment arrived when the two men were given an opportunity to show their human sides.’
      • ‘Colly still has a mad side to his character that he did as a player.’
      • ‘Those criticisms have provided an opportunity for a critique of some aspects of the operational side of the scheme.’
      • ‘They represent the dark side and undesirable aspect of the modern and civilised world.’
      • ‘He was always the first to see the funny side of any situation and his smile lit up any room he entered.’
      • ‘Yet he was also an awkward companion, with a cranky side to his character.’
      • ‘I've seen an ugly, petty side of people that I'd rather not have known about.’
      • ‘Other characters also show darker sides to their personalities.’
      • ‘Inspector Miles has even tried to inject a bit of humour into the letter and said the police were trying to show their human side.’
      • ‘It was never overly political but always attached to the human side of events.’
      • ‘According to the young bride, her wedding was the bringing together of the emotional and business sides of her character.’
      • ‘That is one of the less pleasant sides of our character and it strongly suggests a lack of backbone.’
    4. 4.4 A person's kinship or line of descent as traced through either their father or mother.
      ‘Richard was of French descent on his mother's side’
      • ‘Her father was an engineer and her relations on her mother's side were miners.’
      • ‘Mrs Marx was a Campbell on her mother's side and was a cousin of the then Duke of Argyll.’
      • ‘It started with a message from my sister, notifying me that my eldest cousin on my father's side was getting married.’
      • ‘His mother's side of the family owned a farm where he spent most of his summers.’
      • ‘Lynne and her sister went off to live with an aunt on her mother's side.’
      • ‘He took the side of his mother, whose royalist background in the west of France he subsequently mythologized.’
      • ‘In fact, on his mother's side he was descended from fur traders and native Indians.’
      • ‘He was a military man, a colonel, who came from a long line of military men on my mother's side of the family.’
      • ‘On his mother's side of the family, Ian found a further rich seam of history.’
      • ‘His mother's side of the family were farming in Upper Wharfedale in the 14th century.’
      • ‘I come from a family which is steeped in the law, on both my mother's and father's sides.’
      • ‘Many relatives on my mother's side experienced the Nazis at first hand during the Second World War.’
      • ‘It is there from either side, but stronger on just one side of my lineage, my mother's side.’
      • ‘All my ancestors on both my father's and mother's sides were employed in the mining and steel industries.’
      • ‘My forebears on my mother's side were farmers and fishermen at Marshside near Southport.’
      • ‘Partly Spanish by ancestry, he claimed descent on his father's side from the Scottish monarchy.’
      • ‘The two figures you see down here beside the roots are actually my grandparents on my mother's side.’
      • ‘With his patrician ancestry, going back to the Puritans on his mother's side, he acts as though he is born to rule.’
      • ‘A mechanic's son, he is descended on his mother's side from a line of griots.’
      • ‘He wanted to know more about his grandfather on his mother's side.’
  • 5Horizontal spinning motion given to a ball.

    • ‘The ancillary action of the cue ball, when using side spin to compensate for throw, is an entirely different subject that can not be covered here.’
    • ‘But the value of side spin is only apparent when rail shots come into play.’
    • ‘However, if one attempts side spin, and accidentally puts vertical spin on the ball as well, the spin axis is changed and the ball can curve off the intended path.’
    • ‘You can add side spin and/or backspin/topspin.’
    • ‘As in the console versions, you're also able to add top and side spin to the ball while it's airborne, which may seem a little unrealistic, but it makes the game more enjoyable.’
    1. 5.1Billiards
      another term for English
      • ‘He put a lot of left hand side on the cue ball, sending it round the table.’

verb

  • 1side with/against[no object] Support or oppose in a conflict, dispute, or debate.

    ‘he felt that Max had betrayed him by siding with Beatrice’
    • ‘I believe she made this statement in an attempt to encourage me to side with her.’
    • ‘Let's hope the courts side with the consumers, and gut this stupid law of its potency.’
    • ‘So clearly they would side with the husband in the case, at least based on how we look at it.’
    • ‘The difference is, of course, that in the classroom the other kids don't side with the bully.’
    • ‘He protests, but when Pickering sides with his mother he accepts the criticism.’
    • ‘So we are inclined to side with the powerless rather than the powerful.’
    • ‘Now I don't know whether clients can get this bad, but I'm sure someone can side with me on this.’
    • ‘Her mother always sided with Jerry these days, so arguing would be to no avail.’
    • ‘Why do they even bother to wear uniforms if they are only going to side with the powerful and the rich?’
    • ‘I appreciate that there are cogent reasons to side with the respondent on this issue.’
    • ‘I'm close to my Mum so I sided with her and started supporting Liverpool too.’
    • ‘Let the councillors side with local people rather than the interests of big business.’
    • ‘Rob can also side with enemies of his country without fear of consequences.’
    • ‘I overheard father say once that some of the other kingdoms are starting to side with him.’
    • ‘To side with big business against environmental regulation does these countries no credit.’
    • ‘An arbitrator was called in to settle the dispute and sided with the Flyers.’
    • ‘Marie was disappointed that Ben had chosen to side with the management.’
    • ‘A layman studying Ferguson's chaotic, violent past might also choose to side with the police.’
    • ‘If New Labour prefers to side with big business, maybe it's time for a genuine socialist alternative?’
    • ‘Most people would have been upset with their lack of faith but he had to side with them.’
    support, give one's support to, take the part of, side with, be on the side of, stand by, stand up for, stick up for, be supportive of, encourage, back, back up, give one's backing to, uphold, take to one's heart, be loyal to, defend, come to the defence of, champion, ally with, ally oneself with, associate oneself with, sympathize with, favour, prefer, abet, aid and abet
    View synonyms
  • 2[with object] Provide with a side or sides; form the side of.

    ‘the hills that side a long valley’
    • ‘We left the farmlands now, and the road was sided by hills and long grass waves glittering in the wind.’

Phrases

  • by (or at) someone's side

    • Close to someone, especially so as to give them comfort or moral support.

      ‘a stepson who stayed by your side when your own son deserted you’
      • ‘But, now that I have returned, I would like to take this opportunity to promise to stay by your side forever.’
      • ‘I wanted to make sure these people were going to stay by my side and they were going to love me until I left.’
      • ‘She stayed by my side, and defended me when someone decided to say something negative to me.’
      • ‘My guide was brilliant, he stayed by my side and kept me going all the time.’
      • ‘But, my dear lady, I wish to remain with you, to stay by your side and protect you in times of danger, and to assist you as you live out your destiny.’
      • ‘She has told police that she is prepared to stay by his side for as long as it takes.’
      • ‘I long to be by your side to comfort you in your time of pain.’
      • ‘I cannot see what Roy thinks of me, but he is the only person that I know who will stay by my side, no matter what.’
      • ‘And all she could do was sit and feel quite helpless, wishing she was at Anna's side to comfort her and hold her hand.’
      • ‘It is beneficial to reassure your child that you will be staying by their side, and promote the idea that the hospital is a safe place to be.’
  • by the side of

    • Close to.

      ‘a house by the side of the road’
      • ‘Rubbish is often dumped by the side of country lanes where the offenders can empty out their cars or vans without being seen.’
      • ‘A second permanent rink will be placed by the side of the main building.’
      • ‘The other night we saw a poor, abandoned, unwanted, unloved creature by the side of the road.’
      • ‘As the altitude decreases, wild flowers and birds emerge by the side of the trail.’
      • ‘Nigel lives in Majorca and showed me a photo of his house, by the side of a mountain, overlooking the sea.’
  • from side to side

    • 1Alternately left and right from a central point.

      ‘I shook my head frantically from side to side’
      • ‘Looking from side to side, he slipped quickly through the kitchen into the hallway.’
      • ‘Alex pushed the joystick forward and from side to side, and rolled his little thumbs over the buttons.’
      • ‘The road was really wet and my car started bouncing from side to side and going towards the central reservation.’
      • ‘Her eyes dart frantically from side to side and she shoots me a petrified stare.’
      • ‘Work your way out from the center, alternating from side to side and top to bottom.’
      • ‘You can complete all reps for one side before going to the other or alternate from side to side.’
      • ‘She stretched her neck from side to side and made her way over.’
      • ‘Her eyes flick from side to side as if she is avoiding tears.’
      • ‘By the age of nine, he was not able to walk or stand, or even turn his head from side to side.’
      • ‘On the odd occasion I managed to look down, I could see the float out of the water rushing frantically from side to side.’
    • 2Across the entire width; right across.

      ‘the fleet stretched four miles from side to side’
      • ‘Both sets of defences were on high alert as play swung from side to side.’
      • ‘The ball had been switched from side to side before finally Stark was given the scoring pass wide on the right.’
      • ‘With only five of us in the basket there was plenty of space to go from side to side.’
      in breadth, in width, from side to side, wide, across, thick
      View synonyms
  • have something on one's side (or something is on one's side)

    • Something is operating to one's advantage.

      ‘now that he had time on his side, Tom relaxed a little’
      • ‘If you choose not to work over that limit, the law is on your side and makes clear that you must not be discriminated against in any way.’
      • ‘All they know is that God is on their side, naturally.’
      • ‘She thinks the law is on her side and she has power.’
      • ‘Every issue, from genetic engineering to urban planning, sparks divisive debates about morality, with all sides claiming that right is on their side.’
      • ‘They're 100 percent convinced that justice is on their side.’
      • ‘Readers need to know that the ombudsman is on their side.’
      • ‘He argues that the administering of swift punishment for an offence not only makes the criminal think twice, but reassures law-abiding members of society that the justice system is on their side.’
      • ‘The self-styled forces of ‘progress’ believe that justice is on their side.’
      • ‘And on that, I'm not sure I would say categorically that time is on our side.’
      • ‘We are very confident that the momentum is on our side.’
  • on (or to) one side

    • 1Out of one's way; aside.

      • ‘Throughout the long march which followed, she had remained to one side, parallel but alone.’
      • ‘I should put it to one side and if I need to pay the taxman anything, I can use that.’
      • ‘The cast put their wellies to one side and donned the glad rags to perform songs from the musical High Society.’
      • ‘We stopped doing this after we found some rather large bugs in some rice that had been put off to one side.’
      • ‘Now she was sitting comfortably, her back was straight and her bag had been abandoned to one side.’
      • ‘When you're ready to make the sauce, remove the onion, bay leaf and peppercorns and keep them on one side.’
      • ‘The rest of the deck is put to one side to be dealt when the first six cards have been played.’
      • ‘Meanwhile, a jar of peppers had been drained, with the vinegar being kept to one side.’
      • ‘As soon as it comes to the boil, remove it from the heat and put it to one side.’
      • ‘If the wrong rubbish is in the grey bin, will it be taken out and left to one side, or will it be put back into the bin, after it has been emptied?’
      to one side, to the side
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1To be dealt with or considered later, especially because tending to distract one from something more important.
        ‘before the kickoff a player has to set his disappointments and frustrations to one side’
        • ‘If only he could have put his bruised ego to one side and managed something similar.’
        • ‘If we can put sentimental interests to one side then all can benefit.’
        • ‘Since I had children, that part of me has been put to one side temporarily.’
        • ‘The subject is not closed, but it is put to one side, for private thought.’
        • ‘I've now pushed all my doubts to one side and have made the leap.’
        • ‘Leaving the architectural taste of other colleges to one side, the front quad is one of the great Oxford vistas.’
        • ‘You have to put the law to one side and turn to face what you think is the right decision for you.’
  • on the —— side

    • Tending toward being ——; rather —— (used to qualify an adjective)

      ‘these shoes are a bit on the tight side’
      • ‘It was just a touch on the rude side but it made me laugh until my toes curled.’
      • ‘If there was a downside, you could argue that the bill was a little on the hefty side.’
      • ‘Only a handful of cod were caught and those landed were a little on the small side.’
      • ‘Now they just give him three months every three months, just to be on the safe side.’
      • ‘The meat was tender, but just a little too much on the fatty side to enjoy as a cold dish.’
      • ‘I got only a few steps along the lane for my walk today before realizing it was a bit on the cold side for me.’
      • ‘In fact the whole place was a bit on the quiet side, but maybe I arrived a bit early in the day.’
      • ‘All three are on the light side, but they make the most of their resources and more.’
      • ‘There was a tiny amount of a temperature, and his usually cold and damp nose was a tad on the dry side.’
      • ‘The slices of duck were too small and a little on the tough side, and the pear chutney was bland.’
  • on the side

    • 1In addition to one's regular job or as a subsidiary source of income.

      ‘no one lived in the property, but the caretaker made a little on the side by renting rooms out’
      • ‘Was the chief earning a little extra income on the side to make ends meet?’
      • ‘They are renting those rooms out to boarders and making quite a tidy income on the side.’
      • ‘Not only are consultants well paid by the state, they are also allowed to perform private work on the side.’
      • ‘Traditional puppeteers supplement their income by selling craft on the side.’
    • 2Secretly, especially with regard to a relationship in addition to one's legal or regular partner.

      ‘Brian had a mistress on the side’
      • ‘So there's a good chance she could be dating a young guy on the side.’
      • ‘Being parents and having a secret lifestyle on the side was hard for both of them.’
      • ‘He has affairs on the side and says there is a pool of other South Asian men doing just that.’
      • ‘We both had a few little flings on the side, but nothing too major, or at least not on my part.’
      • ‘It's just a cover story so the pair of you can have something on the side.’
      • ‘This girl has spent her life reading books and being a scholar, while I read on the side.’
      • ‘I have seen a number of women on the side and always justified it by my wife's lack of interest.’
      covertly, without anyone knowing, in secret, in private, privately, in confidence, confidentially, behind closed doors, behind the scenes, behind someone's back, under cover, under the counter, discreetly, unobserved, quietly, furtively, stealthily, on the sly, on the quiet, privily, conspiratorially, clandestinely, on the side
      View synonyms
    • 3Served separately from the main dish.

      ‘a club sandwich with french fries on the side’
      • ‘Although the fish makes its own light sauce during baking you may want to serve a fruity salsa on the side.’
      • ‘To make the sauce, simply mix the mayonnaise, garlic and dill together and serve on the side.’
      • ‘If picnicking, serve it at room temperature with a cucumber salad on the side.’
      • ‘It is difficult to know exactly what to serve on the side with something you eat in this manner.’
      • ‘The breaded meat, fried to crispness, is served with mashed potatoes and a simple salad on the side.’
      • ‘Coffee still seems to be the main staple with a small sandwich or salad on the side.’
      • ‘It was chicken and dumpling soup with a slice of bread on the side and a glass of water.’
      • ‘You can serve this with whipped cream on the side, or add in a few chopped dates before baking.’
      • ‘My favourite dish is grilled tuna with steamed spinach on the side.’
      • ‘I asked for salsa rather than sour cream on the side and this added a fiery edge.’
  • side by side

    • 1(of two or more people or things) close together and facing the same way.

      ‘on we jogged, side by side, for a mile’
      • ‘The vehicles park side by side, the brides are hastily exchanged, and the cars head home to the waiting grooms.’
      • ‘The canyon was too narrow for the horses to turn around, or even stand side by side.’
      • ‘As we walked side by side through the park Jacob reached out and clasped my hand in his.’
      • ‘Soon, the boys were at the park, walking side by side in silence.’
      • ‘We walked side by side until we got to the park, not saying a word to each other.’
      • ‘Adrian walked closer to Damien and stood side by side next to him.’
      • ‘Sara clasped her hands around his and leaned in closer so that they were walking side by side, both smiling and blushing.’
      • ‘Blake joined her in the chant, and the two laid down on the grass, side by side, closing their eyes.’
      • ‘The next time Will comes to the office, Sean greets him at the door and they head off to a park where they sit side by side on a bench looking forward.’
      • ‘After a short walk through the trees, they arrived at two tan jeeps parked side by side in a small dirt clearing.’
      beside each other, abreast, level, shoulder to shoulder, cheek by jowl, together, close together
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Together.
        ‘we have been using both systems, side by side, for two years’
        • ‘Then we'll edit each other's copy and make the changes side by side at the computer.’
        • ‘The two prophecies sit side by side, but sound discordant when heard together.’
        • ‘For these words, I may just give two definitions side by side.’
        • ‘It may be difficult to manage, but it cannot be impossible to run the two programmes either side by side or together.’
        at the same time, at one and the same time, at the same instant, at the same moment, simultaneously, contemporaneously
        View synonyms
      2. 1.2(of people or groups) supporting each other; in cooperation.
        ‘the two institutions worked side by side in complete harmony’
        • ‘I think there is plenty of room for them to work side by side, helping each other.’
        • ‘Where else do people of such varying ethnic origins, ages and walks of life work side by side in such (on the whole) perfect harmony?’
        • ‘Heron and Dawson fought side by side, protecting each other and protecting Neela.’
        • ‘It's a cooperative effort, and the Portuguese and Americans work side by side to carry out the mission.’
        • ‘It is good to celebrate living and working side by side in the spirit of multi-cultural harmony.’
        • ‘The licensing laws were not too strict in those days and both sides did business side by side.’
        • ‘The police around the country, man and woman, side by side, support the bill.’
        • ‘So he taught us how to value each other, how to be side by side with each other.’
        • ‘Instead of opposing each other, men and woman now work side by side.’
  • side of the fence

    • Either of the opposing positions involved in a conflict.

      ‘whatever side of the fence you are on, the issue is here to stay’
      • ‘But he wanted me to stop as a player and go on that side of the fence.’
      • ‘Join me as we look at these issues from the other side of the fence.’
      • ‘There were some people on the other side of the fence, may I say, who reached out and suggested it.’
      • ‘Now, we're on the opposite side of the fence - we're selling the little house we've grown to love.’
      • ‘You were a media planner, and handled the media campaigns of other models, so what did you learn from the other side of the fence?’
      • ‘I'm just here to let people know what was really going down on my side of the fence.’
      • ‘I hope to understand where people who sit on the other side of the fence from me are coming from.’
      • ‘As a fan, I'm looking forward to being on the other side of the fence.’
      • ‘I used the term odd, because the same electoral trend was not apparent on the nationalist side of the fence.’
      • ‘In 1994 they had been on the other side of the fence, yet, today they all sit next to each other peacefully in church.’
  • take sides

    • Support one person or cause against another or others in a dispute, conflict, or contest.

      ‘I do not want to take sides in this matter’
      • ‘The Labour MP, who called the meeting, told union members he could not take sides in an industrial dispute.’
      • ‘Parents can help their children through a breakup by being supportive without taking sides.’
      • ‘She hated watching us fight, but never took sides and could only muster up a whimper for a truce.’
      • ‘Instead, it essentially took sides in the long-running Afghan civil war, linking up with any faction that opposed the Taliban.’
      • ‘Some parents took sides with the government policy and supported the plan in force.’
      • ‘Some people are already taking sides, and the boss is looking for support from the people in your department.’
      • ‘Nevertheless, with the exception of France, countries took sides and stayed there.’
      • ‘In any event, while ever aware of these differences, we have chosen not to be drawn into the dispute since as historians we can't afford the luxury of taking sides.’
      • ‘Today it seems as if there is no need to be ashamed when taking sides.’
      • ‘That councilors took sides is not only ludicrous, it is illogical.’
      support, give one's support to, take the part of, side with, be on the side of, stand by, stand up for, stick up for, be supportive of, encourage, back, back up, give one's backing to, uphold, take to one's heart, be loyal to, defend, come to the defence of, champion, ally with, ally oneself with, associate oneself with, sympathize with, favour, prefer, abet, aid and abet
      View synonyms
  • take (or draw) someone to one side

    • Speak to someone in private, especially so as to advise or warn them about something.

      • ‘As midnight struck, Eddie took Tracey to one side and slipped the ring they had chosen together on to her finger.’
      • ‘On the basis that real friends should point out the error of their ways to save their friends from trouble, Bertie should take George to one side and tell him.’
      • ‘When you were in a bad mood he would take you to one side and help make a joke out of it.’
      • ‘He respects my age and quite often takes me to one side and speaks to me about players.’
      • ‘It was as though he had been taken to one side and told to keep his mouth shut.’
      • ‘He quickly took Tania to one side and spoke to her.’
      • ‘Before they embarrass themselves further, take them to one side and explain.’
      • ‘They took me to one side, sat me down and said it was cancer, but it was treatable.’
      • ‘However members of staff did take her to one side and request she get rid of the red streaks.’
      • ‘My father took me to one side and told me I had to save the family honour.’
  • this side of

    • 1Before (a particular time, date, or event)

      ‘this side of midnight’
      • ‘They owe nothing to the new leader and see little prospect of a Tory election victory this side of 2009.’
      • ‘If everyone reading this downloads just three tracks each, we can prevent her from releasing anything this side of 2015.’
      • ‘He has sabotaged any chance of Australia becoming a Republic this side of the millennium but we will become a Republic some time in the next ten years.’
      • ‘Half of the next album is written and parts of it are already in demo form, so expect new material sometime this side of 2005.’
      • ‘She reckons she has another three novels in her, so anyone who expects another this side of 2010 should probably lay off the codeine.’
      • ‘They have tough questions for him on his proposals and farmers are entitled to have his answers this side of the referendum.’
      • ‘Unfortunately I don't think we will see him play again this side of Christmas.’
      1. 1.1Yet to reach (a particular age)
        ‘I'm this side of forty-five’
        • ‘It was nice to see that all the former students have aged well and while now everyone has a good idea of our ages, we are all pleased that at least we are still on this side of the half-century mark.’
        • ‘The journey of our life is hopefully towards perfection, and we don't reach it this side of death of course, but the quest is there.’
        • ‘I am not the first person this side of thirty to work here, nor do I expect to be the last.’
        • ‘An obscure Sri Lankan had shoved aside three of the greatest batsmen in cricket history, the wonder carried in the voice of an Indian just this side of 70.’
        • ‘Let's face it, she must be one of the most glamorous women supposed to be this side of forty on the planet.’
    • 2Used in superlative expressions to denote that something is comparable with a paragon or model of its kind.

      ‘the finest coffee this side of Brazil’
      • ‘The sell-out success of last year's event saw some of the most fashionable hats this side of Royal Ascot.’
      • ‘I remember one time I stole a kiss in the back orchard - they've got the largest plot of land this side of anywhere.’
      • ‘The days were warm and comfortable, he thought absently, but the nights were just this side of bitterly cold.’
      • ‘The leaflet shows photos of a palace the size of Corsica, immaculate formal gardens and a belle époque tearoom with one of the most beautiful sea views this side of the Seychelles.’
      • ‘Of course, there's tourist buses galore, and some of the biggest camera lenses this side of sporting events and paparazzi.’
      • ‘It was Mathias' voice, deep and undulating, a hair's breadth this side of under control.’
      • ‘You won't find a better dance ensemble this side of that imaginary line that separates the US from the wild and beautiful lands to its south.’
      • ‘This place has the best coffee, tea, hot chocolate and pastries this side of the Rocky Mountains.’
      • ‘It serves the other best coffee I have ever had this side of the Mediterranean.’
      • ‘Just a couple of years ago, the vegetable patches yielded some of the sweetest spinach this side of the Yangtze River.’

Origin

Old English sīde left or right part of the body of Germanic origin; related to Dutch zijde and German Seite, probably from a base meaning extending lengthwise.

Pronunciation:

side

/sīd/