Definition of shrewd in English:

shrewd

adjective

  • 1Having or showing sharp powers of judgment; astute.

    ‘she was shrewd enough to guess the motive behind his gesture’
    ‘a shrewd career move’
    • ‘Her observations of people quickly gave her a shrewd idea of people's personalities and hence she could, for example, give friends advice on what to expect when associate with certain others.’
    • ‘Pitt made his way to power more by shrewd political judgement and sheer luck than by public acclaim.’
    • ‘Talking of money, the reporters were shrewd enough to know that there was an emergency allowance set aside for those deprived of their means of livelihood.’
    • ‘A shrewd businessman, he raised his fees to unprecedented heights - and his envious rivals followed his example.’
    • ‘He was a very shrewd, very sharp head of the Securities and Exchange Commission.’
    • ‘However, he worked hard and his shrewd diplomatic judgement enabled him to help forge an alliance with France in 1717-18.’
    • ‘Whether Gandhi made her move out of shrewd calculation or simple magnanimity, it was a political master stroke.’
    • ‘In a press conference held in Melksham, the extent of his ill-gotten gains was revealed giving an insight into a man who the police describe as manipulative and a shrewd businessman.’
    • ‘The sisters have already adopted a shrewd business move to allow children and their parents to learn together at the same time.’
    • ‘The case cannot be literally proved, of course, but we have a shrewd idea of what can happen when such regimes are left to choose the initiative.’
    • ‘The great Democratic presidents were not merely shrewd enough to balance their domestic programmes with a proficiency at fighting wars.’
    • ‘Shumba was a fast fellow though and with a shrewd, sharp glance at Shanza he sat back for a moment.’
    • ‘General manager Danny Ferry made a shrewd move in signing the 32-year-old power forward.’
    • ‘Businessmen will hire shrewd youngsters, who will help boost business.’
    • ‘This acts as another check on presidential power and a shrewd president will realise this.’
    • ‘Aside from sponsoring motor races, Gordon was shrewd enough to recognise the potential of the infant motor industry.’
    • ‘Your admirers and detractors alike have used these terms - an astute politician, shrewd, cunning - to characterise you.’
    • ‘Miller's round body and comeback saga make him a fan favorite, but he's neither quick nor shrewd enough to play quality defense.’
    • ‘Slaveowners claimed that their practices, unlike sharp and shrewd Yankee treatment of factory workers, were unprofitable.’
    • ‘So it apparently represents what he enjoys, but it may also reflect a very shrewd choice of career path in the future.’
    astute, sharp-witted, sharp, acute, intelligent, clever, alert, canny, media-savvy, perceptive, perspicacious, observant, discriminating, sagacious, sage, wise, far-seeing, far-sighted
    cunning, artful, crafty, wily, calculating, disingenuous
    on the ball, smart, savvy
    suss
    pawky
    heads-up
    long-headed, sapient, argute
    have all one's wits about one
    View synonyms
  • 2archaic (especially of weather) piercingly cold.

    ‘a shrewd east wind’
    1. 2.1(of a blow) severe.
      ‘a bayonet's shrewd thrust’
    2. 2.2Mischievous; malicious.

Origin

Middle English (in the sense evil in nature or character): from shrew in the sense evil person or thing or as the past participle of obsolete shrew to curse. The word developed the sense cunning and gradually gained a favorable connotation during the 17th century.

Pronunciation:

shrewd

/SHro͞od/