Definition of shoyu in English:

shoyu

noun

  • A type of Japanese soy sauce.

    • ‘For Healthy People Not Sensitive to Soy: Enjoying old-fashioned soy products such as miso, tempeh, natto, shoyu, and tamari should be no problem if they are ingested at the levels eaten traditionally in Asia.’
    • ‘Deglaze with apple juice, vinegar, dashi, shoyu and add pork belly back to pan.’
    • ‘The three main soya bean products - miso, tofu, and shoyu - are the second largest source of protein for the Japanese.’
    • ‘An isoflavone called genistein found in soybeans or soybean products, such as miso, shoyu and tamari blocks blood vessels from growing to tumours.’
    • ‘In October 1945, black market prices for miso (bean paste) and shoyu (soy sauce) were forty-five times higher than official prices.’
    • ‘It is also used in food fermentations, in the production of saki, shoyu, miso, and soy sauce, and as a source of industrial enzymes.’
    • ‘Add ginger juice and, if desired, shoyu to taste.’
    • ‘All are eaten with distinct condiments, including gari (pickled sliced ginger), wasabi and shoyu (soy sauce).’
    • ‘Rationing of fruits, vegetables, shoyu, miso, and fish also commenced at this time, which brought the consumption of all basic foodstuffs under some form of government control, at least in theory.’
    • ‘There's a welcome restraint with salt, so you won't be gasping with thirst later on, unless you go mad with the shoyu.’
    • ‘I go to the cupboard and get some shoyu.’
    • ‘Soy sauce - the natural type sold under the Japanese name shoyu - began as the liquid poured off during the production of miso.’
    • ‘If you've spent any time in Japan and so have tasted genuine traditionally brewed shoyu (soy sauce), there is of course no substitute.’
    • ‘I have eaten traditionally processed organic soy foods such as tofu, tempeh, cooked yellow and black soybeans, miso, shoyu, and tamari several times per week for more than 30 years.’
    • ‘Add shoyu and matsutake caps; cover for five minutes.’
    • ‘In a saucepan, combine dashi, mirin and shoyu; heat to 120 degrees.’

Origin

From Japanese shōyu.

Pronunciation

shoyu

/ˈSHōyo͞o/