Definition of shove in English:

shove

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Push (someone or something) roughly.

    ‘police started pushing and shoving people down the street’
    [no object] ‘kids pushed, kicked, and shoved’
    • ‘Gail is pushing me away but someone else shoves me out the way too.’
    • ‘People were pushing and shoving each other at the end of the hall for better spots in the lines to use the bathrooms.’
    • ‘She spat at him angrily, shoving him roughly away from her, not wanting his friendly, compassionate touch.’
    • ‘During the questioning they would push and shove me.’
    • ‘Prisoners were pushing and shoving each other trying to get a better view of what was going on.’
    • ‘As I stand in shock, Riley pushes me to the side and then forcefully shoves me into a chair.’
    • ‘She quickly turned away as I felt firm hands on my shoulder shove me back into the hard wall.’
    • ‘Inhaling deeply Samantha started pushing and shoving people out of her way mercilessly.’
    • ‘Finally, he was shoved down into a chair and his ankles were handcuffed to the legs of the chairs.’
    • ‘Andy and I got into a bit of a row about something and began pushing and shoving one another.’
    • ‘Damien managed to wrestle the boy away and shove him roughly against the wall, hand over his throat.’
    • ‘She pushed her ahead then shoved her into the bathroom, shutting and locking the door behind them.’
    • ‘She kept pushing at his chest, shoving him closer and closer to the road as she yelled.’
    • ‘When she was satisfied that he was preoccupied she pushed with all her strength, shoving Eric off her and onto the floor.’
    • ‘A few people shoved me to the side but I pushed my way back to face Devon again.’
    • ‘The boy rushes over and shoves him again into the beam, snapping it in half completely.’
    • ‘But one, a muscular young man, was far from happy, yelling, angrily holding his arm, he began pushing and shoving me.’
    • ‘He stepped forward, and as he had hoped, Domenech shoved him back with a firm push to the chest.’
    • ‘Liz placed both of her hands on his shoulders, tried to shove him away but failed miserably.’
    • ‘I was shoved out of the way and pushed into the space between the toilet and tub.’
    push, thrust, propel, impel
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[no object] Make one's way by pushing someone or something.
      ‘Woody shoved past him’
      • ‘He makes a move towards the hall but I shove past him.’
      • ‘I quickly shove past him and run down the sidewalk towards my house.’
      • ‘The children shoved past him - pushing him back into his hallway - jeering and swearing.’
      • ‘He dashed out of the building, shoving past anyone and anything, his only goal to reach home.’
      • ‘Bryce looked up and saw her, glared at her before walking out, shoving past her with his shoulders.’
      • ‘Bryan looked like the kind of jock who would shove past me in the hallway and laugh when I fell.’
      • ‘The soldier tried to shove past the innkeeper, but to no avail.’
      • ‘Blue yanked her coat on, shoving past them and locking the door with fumbling fingers.’
      • ‘When the other kid made to shove past Dustin, I stuck my foot into the aisle and sent him flying.’
      • ‘Clark gave him one last look before shoving past the other guys and jogging away.’
      • ‘Chase shoved past her and rejoined the flow of angry patrons heading for the doors.’
      • ‘I tried to shove past it, but it was solid and heavy, like a rock.’
      • ‘He blinked at me, no doubt wondering how I knew, but caught my arm when I tried to shove past him.’
      • ‘Beth shouted over the roar, pushing and shoving her way through people.’
      • ‘I rubbed my nose and shoved past him since he was blocking the door leading out of the kitchen.’
      • ‘She sent him a look of contempt before shoving past them and going out the front door.’
      • ‘I shoved past Sebastian who inhaled when I walked by and I decided to ignore that.’
      • ‘I shoved past her, through the throngs of people and up the two flights of stairs to my room.’
      • ‘She glared at him and shoved past him, throwing open the door to the women's restroom.’
      • ‘Angelique pulled her arm loose of his grip, shoving past him to continue down the path.’
      force one's way, shoulder one's way, muscle, bludgeon one's way, plunge, crash, bulldoze, sweep, bundle, hustle, hurry, rush
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Put (something) somewhere carelessly or roughly.
      ‘she shoved the books into her briefcase’
      • ‘I shove the book back into my bag and stare into space for a while.’
      • ‘He leans against a wall carelessly and shoves his hands into his pockets.’
      • ‘I pulled them out of my bag and ate three, shoving the rest back.’
      • ‘Decisively, I shove all of my books into my bag, making sure to create as much racket as possible while doing so.’
      • ‘Ryan tossed his black messenger bag on the desk and shoved his binder and books into it.’
      • ‘I just picked up all my books and shoved them into my locker as fast as my body could work.’
      • ‘He was so sexy, I thought absently as I shoved my six inch book into my old blue locker.’
      • ‘Skipping her morning shower, she threw on some clothes and gathered her books, shoving them in her bag on her way downstairs.’
      • ‘She shoved her place marker into the book of spells she had been absorbed in and snapped it closed.’
      • ‘Langley muttered darkly under her breath and shoving her hands in her pockets, started off towards the town.’
      • ‘I settled for shoving my hands in my pockets and staring at the Ghiradelli shop I was standing across the street from.’
      • ‘She ran and grabbed her book bag, shoving everything in quickly.’
      • ‘I had just shoved my Precalculus book into my backpack when I felt a sharp poke in my back.’
      • ‘I licked my lips and shoved the last of my books into my locker.’
      • ‘He looked over again and smiled before shoving them carelessly in his book bag.’
      • ‘She moved to the massive cherrywood table and began to shove her notebooks and text books into her leather backpack.’
      • ‘I picked up my books, shoving my papers back into the file, and walked out of the bathroom, acting as if nothing had happened.’
      • ‘Sara shoved her math books on the shelf and stuffed a blue lunchbag into her backpack.’
      • ‘Gathering his books together, he shoved them into his bag and slung it over his shoulder.’
      • ‘After pulling his shorts up to his waist, he carelessly shoved the jump suit into the closet.’
      put, place, rest, deposit, set, set down, lay, leave, settle, stick, position, station
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    3. 1.3shove itinformal Used to express angry dismissal of something.
      ‘I should have told the boss to shove it’
      • ‘Take your macho bravado and shove it.’
      • ‘Would it be possible for us to send a message and tell them to take their oil and shove it?’
      • ‘And I have had other people talking about me being just, you know, disgusting and they can shove it.’
      • ‘You're probably on track when you imply I can shove it if I don't like it.’
      • ‘What did you think of your stepmother telling somebody to shove it?’
      • ‘In my case I told them to shove it and said I would just keep deleting the bogus e-mails being rejected by other ISP servers.’
      • ‘And tell those collaborationist bastards to shove it too, for that matter.’
      • ‘This is why an artist should do their own thing, and tell their managers to shove it when they offer ‘helpful’ advice.’

noun

  • [usually in singular] A strong push.

    ‘she gave him a hefty shove and he nearly fell’
    • ‘With a great shove, he pushed them open and gasped at the sight.’
    • ‘Then, after giving Estes a slight shove, she turns to the rest of us.’
    • ‘She gave him a shove before running back towards her room.’
    • ‘‘You don't look so bad yourself’ I said while giving him a playful shove on the shoulder.’
    • ‘With a shove, Stephanie pushes Jessica sideways onto the bed and moves to the telephone keeping her gun keenly trained on Jessica.’
    • ‘A few well timed shoves jolted the wooden crate that had barred the exit, leading them all up into the eerie silent Southwestern portion of La Fortaleza's courtyard.’
    • ‘It is a robust style in which tugs, nudges, charges and shoves are given and received, but there is far more to Sutton than that.’
    • ‘A large group of people race toward Austin Wolf to get in front of the line with pushes and shoves, in order to reach the stage steps first.’
    • ‘She was being woken with a soft shove on her shoulder.’
    • ‘With a strong shove, he slides the book over to her.’
    • ‘He handed me back the phone and gave my shoulders a shove.’
    • ‘She gave his shoulder a playful shove, and left her hand there.’
    • ‘Mallinder might have added that Sale could have inflicted even more damage on their opponents had safety concerns not restricted them to only the gentlest of shoves in the scrum.’
    • ‘He shouted, recovering quickly from her shove and pushing her back equally hard.’
    • ‘With a strong shove, they were pushed away from the dock and out into the murky waters.’
    • ‘Jamie gave Alex a shove in the shoulder, pushing him toward the side gate.’
    • ‘He started to walk past me, out of the kitchen, but I blocked him, giving him a little shove on the shoulders.’
    • ‘With a shove, I pushed him out of my car and drove off.’
    • ‘From behind me, a rough shove almost knocked me off my feet.’
    • ‘I gave her a shove on her shoulder to see if it would rouse her.’
    push, thrust, barge, ram, bump, bang, jolt, butt, knock, prod, poke, nudge, elbow, shoulder, jostle
    View synonyms

Phrasal Verbs

  • shove off

    • 1[usually in imperative]Go away.

      ‘shove off—you're bothering the customers’
      go away, depart, leave, take off, get out, get out of my sight
      go, go your way, get going, take oneself off, get moving, move off, be off, set off, set out, start out, make a start, take one's leave, decamp, duck out, take wing, walk out, walk off
      be off with you!, shoo!
      hit the road, fly, skedaddle, split, vamoose, scat, scram, make oneself scarce, be on one's way, run along, beat it, get, get lost, push off, buzz off, clear off, skip off, pop off, go jump in the lake, go and jump in the lake
      on your bike!, go and chase yourself!
      get along, push along, get stuffed, sling your hook, hop it, hop the stick, hop the twig, bog off, naff off
      bug off, light out, haul off, haul ass, take a powder, hit the trail, take a hike
      nick off
      rack off
      voetsak, hamba
      bugger off, piss off, fuck off
      sod off
      begone, avaunt
      View synonyms
    • 2Push away from the shore or another vessel in a boat.

      • ‘Laughing angrily at herself, she jumped into the rough boat and shoved off.’
      • ‘I suddenly made up my mind, and with a few quick steps I was beside the boat, tossing in my buckets and shoving off.’
      • ‘The art of boating is continual movement; call us wanderers, but when the chance to cruise arises, we shove off.’
      • ‘Sitting down daintily on the only seat that isn't wet, Chelsea holds her duffel bag close to her chest as the old sailor prepares to shove off.’
      • ‘Huck shoves off for a little island, hides the raft, and sleeps.’
      • ‘The boat shoved off, paddling silently away, and she turned with the rest of her team to crouch in the brush that lined the riverbank.’
      • ‘Ward and his video crew, afraid they'd miss out, commandeered an inflatable raft and shoved off downstream.’
      • ‘They hopped on his private boat the Cannon and they shoved off.’
      • ‘Feeling at a loss, we get into our canoe and shove off, and then any thoughts of the Dunns' welfare vanishes as we think of our own.’
      • ‘Huck finally escapes from the deserted house in the woods and finds a canoe to shove off down the river.’

Origin

Old English scūfan (verb), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch schuiven and German schieben, also to shuffle.

Pronunciation:

shove

/SHəv/