Definition of shout in English:

shout

verb

  • 1[no object] (of a person) utter a loud call or cry, typically as an expression of a strong emotion.

    ‘she shouted for joy’
    • ‘They should shout louder and louder until people listen.’
    • ‘Ben shouted as loud as he could and waved his arms above his head.’
    • ‘Her father shouted, loud enough to make Melanie shudder and step back.’
    • ‘She heard a loud neigh and people shouting outside.’
    • ‘I didn't shout or scream because I thought they would push me off.’
    • ‘The two kids shouted out loud as they hugged the woman at the door.’
    • ‘She had shouted so loud in his face that Troy jumped startled and lost his grip on the beaker.’
    • ‘While he's focusing, the Emerson kids keep shouting and screaming and waving beer bottles in the air.’
    • ‘But I can't help notice Elias Soriano's strong vocals when he's not shouting or being drowned out by the bass.’
    • ‘They were shouting and roaring and had obviously consumed a lot of alcohol or maybe something stronger.’
    • ‘The soldiers were shouting and whooping and hollering.’
    • ‘Sarah shouted as loud as she could so that she could be heard over the other members of the welcoming party for the boat.’
    • ‘Simply because she can shout louder than Kelvin Ramnath does not mean that she makes sense.’
    • ‘There were perhaps two points when he resorted to yelling, but he was shouting over a loud ovation in the auditorium.’
    • ‘Dishes clang, waiters shout, children laugh and people chatter away in expressive, nine-tone, high volume Cantonese.’
    • ‘Once, after a Chopin recital, he began shouting out loud in the street.’
    • ‘But if you do shout loud enough, you will get what you want and need.’
    • ‘She was shouting so loud that her mom peered in through the door.’
    • ‘Michael shouted with some enthusiastic joy that seemed to come out of nowhere.’
    • ‘Delighted family members and neighbours shouted with joy and clapped loudly.’
    yell, cry, cry out, call, call out, roar, howl, bellow, bawl, call at the top of one's voice, clamour, bay, cheer, yawp, yelp, wail, squawk, shriek, scream, screech, squeal, squall, caterwaul, whoop
    raise one's voice
    holler
    vociferate
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[reporting verb] Say something very loudly; call out.
      [with object] ‘he leaned out of his window and shouted abuse at them’
      ‘I shouted out a warning’
      [with direct speech] ‘“Come back!” she shouted’
      • ‘I shouted out ‘House’ and all my friends started to scream.’
      • ‘They shouted out answers, and interrupted the teacher and other students.’
      • ‘He thought they might have had a gun so he shouted out that he had a gun in the room and the men ran off.’
      • ‘And now a name was shouted out from the audience!’
      • ‘Yet he was unbothered by it and quickly shouted out, ‘I saved the glasses!’’
      • ‘All of a sudden there was a lady who shouted out to her husband ‘Well if you're not going to pay attention to me these guys back here will.’’
      • ‘He shouted out ‘Kieran, Kieran’ but there was no answer.’
      • ‘Someone shouted out that they could see thick smoke in the distance.’
      • ‘Naturally, most will want to witness this spectacle with an audience, so as not to miss the rice, toilet paper and lines being shouted out by various enthusiasts.’
      • ‘Two ran away, and one shouted out that her boyfriend would be along shortly.’
      • ‘When Celia asked if she could take their photo, Floyd shouted out, ‘As long as it's not for the FBI!’’
      • ‘After one of his typically brilliant campaign speeches, someone shouted out to Stevenson from the crowd that he had the votes of all thinking Americans.’
      • ‘A member of the public shouted out ‘You're completely ignorant.’’
      • ‘As the girl and her friend ran off, he shouted out that she was beautiful.’
      • ‘A female friend Ms Owen shouted out in court that the decision to adjourn the hearing was ‘cruel.’’
      • ‘Stuart shouted out that he used to be a plumber, rolled up his sleeves, got down on the floor and fiddled about in the cistern until it was fixed.’
      • ‘Ross Hibbert is quite right that it was Billy Cotton, not Arthur Askey, who shouted out ‘Wakey Wakey!’’
      • ‘The woman teaching the class has never had a baby, and she openly scolded me and Jon when we shouted out, ‘Cigars!’’
      • ‘He shouted out that he needed assistance, as he said, ‘I've been shot.’’
      • ‘Allegedly she turns when her name is shouted out.’
    2. 1.2shout at Speak loudly and angrily to; insult or scold loudly.
      ‘he apologized because he had shouted at her in front of them all’
      • ‘They can be sued for comments contained in a school report or accused of verbal abuse if they shout at a pupil.’
      • ‘I would say we have a happy marriage except for the fact that he occasionally loses his temper and shouts at me.’
      • ‘He was the sort of person who would angrily thump the table and shout at the radio during political discussion programmes.’
      • ‘Mattias shouted at the officer, loudly voicing his disapproval at his treatment.’
      • ‘He is no more likely to shout at one of his team-mates than he is to speak to the press.’
      • ‘The officer said he complained about the way he had been shouted at and spoken to by a senior officer.’
      • ‘You can ‘throttle’ the phone by switching it off, but can you stop your wife when she continuously shouts at you?’
      • ‘I was keen to learn some driving skills, because I spend so much time in the family car, unable to do anything while my dad shouts at other drivers.’
      • ‘So, predictably, the huddled masses of Bradford get ignored while those who claim to speak for them shout at each other.’
      • ‘He shouted at her, angrily kicking the ground.’
      • ‘They began to shout at the students in Chinese, particularly insulting one of the girls in the group.’
      • ‘O'Dwyer is talking football and a parting Dublin fan shouts at him from the almost empty Hogan stand.’
      • ‘The police beat her on the legs, feet and buttocks while continuing to curse and shout at her.’
      • ‘He never criticises or shouts at players, but always encourages and praises.’
      • ‘He said: ‘My wife, she just shouts at the kids and then watches soaps all day.’’
      • ‘He has shouted at the kids all weekend as well.’
      • ‘At the Guggenheim a guard, tired of being asked where the proper paintings are, explodes and shouts at an elderly couple that this is a modern-art museum.’
      • ‘If Jennie got angry or offended she might shout at me and what would I do for company then?’
      • ‘My eldest son has become quite aggressive and often shouts at me, telling me he hates me for ‘losing’ his father.’
      • ‘They then started taunting him and shouted at him before kicking the football into his face.’
    3. 1.3shout someone down[with object] Prevent someone from speaking or being heard by shouting.
      ‘he was shouted down as he tried to explain the decision’
      • ‘The public record shows this and shows it was extremists who tried to shout him down and he wouldn't be cowed.’
      • ‘Everyone tried to speak, but Tom shouted them down.’
      • ‘Maybe it's time to start listening to them instead of freezing them out or shouting them down.’
      • ‘And it means that if I am shouted down then I will simply speak louder so that everyone in Scotland can hear the truth, because the future of our country depends on that truth.’
      • ‘It was quite obvious I would be shouted down but nothing was done to move these people away or to talk to them privately.’
      • ‘Emphasise it today and a chorus of respectable voices will shout you down.’
      • ‘These ‘enlightened’ students would have shouted him down.’
      • ‘But he doesn't talk down to his callers and, unlike some of the big names, he doesn't shout them down, either.’
      • ‘Monday night's meeting was dominated by members hurling abuse at the directors, including climbing on stage in an effort to shout them down.’
      • ‘It tells us that when he speaks in Bournemouth today the delegates will probably not shout him down either.’
      • ‘Many found it easier to shout her down or just ignore her.’
      • ‘For his candor and wisdom, Hastert was shouted down.’
      • ‘At least we know how to put our money where our mouth is by standing up and shouting you down.’
      • ‘Jonny and Darce had argued sometimes, but Chris had shouted them down.’
      • ‘I suggested that we introduce Edinburgh weighting at a recent union conference, but I was shouted down because it was seen as divisive.’
      • ‘The other miners turned on them and shouted them down.’
      • ‘So it's not good enough for us to sit back in Westminster and simply try to shout them down.’
      • ‘We are not going to let those who disagree with us shout us down under a banner of false patriotism.’
      • ‘The boys all shouted him down and said ‘No, no start with the first day.’’
      • ‘When he blamed me at the board meeting, every other member of the board shouted him down.’
    4. 1.4[with object] Indicate or express (a particular quality or characteristic) unequivocally or powerfully.
      ‘from crocodile handbag to gold-trimmed shoes, she shouted money’
  • 2Australian NZ informal [with two objects] Treat (someone) to (something, especially a drink)

    ‘I'll shout you a beer’
    • ‘He'll happily let you shout him a drink and not return the favour, for example.’
    • ‘In addition he shouted me my meal, even though it was more of a snack than a meal, which was very generous of him I must say.’
    • ‘To make amends I shouted him a double absinthe, and ordered two shandies for Irigaray and Virilio.’
    • ‘As for Terry Maher, I insist that he shout me a red wine at Percy's.’
    • ‘The pub was pretty full, but Bryan had his guys let me through and then shouted me a drink (which was rather nice of him).’
    1. 2.1[no object] Buy a round of drinks.
      ‘anyone shooting a hole in one must shout for all players present on the course’

noun

  • 1A loud cry expressing a strong emotion or calling attention.

    ‘his words were interrupted by warning shouts’
    • ‘A shout caught my attention and I heard the soldiers switch their direction.’
    • ‘She heard a loud shout coming from the top floor.’
    • ‘A shout captured everyone's attention, and they scurried down from the rocks to the trickle of water.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, the scream cuts off, and is replaced by loud shouts and noisy swearing in Spanish.’
    • ‘Then, there was a loud shout and all hell broke loose.’
    • ‘He woke them up with a shout for attention that made the amplifiers screech and whine.’
    • ‘Each punch that hit her was followed by a loud shout.’
    • ‘I heard another cheer go up, and heard loud whoops and shouts.’
    • ‘They go off with a very intense flash and a loud shout.’
    • ‘A shout drew my attention to one of the others - only a hand was sticking out through the snow.’
    • ‘She gave out a strong shout, much louder than she intended to.’
    • ‘Then loud shouts and insults were heard in the house.’
    • ‘There were dozens of torches on the walls, and there were loud shouts and screams from all around him.’
    • ‘Loud shouts, yells, and laughs ran from the tavern and out onto the street, disturbing the town's late night silence.’
    • ‘His shout attracted Paris' attention, and he looked over Helen's shoulder at his brother.’
    • ‘A second later, there were loud shouts from the beach.’
    • ‘Just then, an excited shout shifted Brenna's attention.’
    • ‘They were right behind her, their shouts becoming louder.’
    • ‘The shouts grew louder and louder as the guards approached.’
    • ‘The superior officer clapped his hands and called for attention with a loud shout, which echoed throughout the hold.’
    yell, cry, call, roar, howl, bellow, bawl, clamour, bay, cheer, yawp, yelp, wail, squawk, shriek, scream, screech, squeal, squall, caterwaul, whoop
    holler
    vociferation
    View synonyms
  • 2British one's shoutinformal One's turn to buy a round of drinks.

    ‘“Do you want another drink? My shout.”’

Phrases

  • give someone a shout

    • 1informal Call for someone's attention.

      1. 1.1Call on or get in touch with someone.
        • ‘By the way, if anyone knows the background and history of why Finance Ministers wear flowers for budget speeches, feel free to give me a shout.’
        • ‘Everything should be back to normal now but if it's not then please give us a shout.’
        • ‘The composer of the show, Bill Whelan, gave me a shout.’
        • ‘If you discover any horrendous problems with the new design, don't suffer in silence - just give me a shout.’
        • ‘If you know anything about this development, give me a shout at the address below!’
        • ‘She wanted me to promote her CD in Canada, so give me a shout if you want to hear some good Swahili tunes.’
        • ‘If you still need any help feel free to give me a shout.’
        • ‘I'm sure that if she came to Chichester, she would give me a shout.’
        • ‘I'll be downstairs so just give me a shout if you need anything.’
        • ‘Anyway, if you've got any more questions - important ones, mind you - give me a shout.’
  • in with a shout

    • informal Having a good chance.

      ‘they were definitely in with a shout of bringing off a victory’
      • ‘Currie were still in with a shout but their best chance failed when Ramon took a marginally forward pass from Halbert before crossing the line.’
      • ‘‘If you win your home games, you are in with a shout,’ says Ross.’
      • ‘Wigginton put together a 55-53 win at Tadcaster and 61-47 win at Tollerton to keep themselves in with a shout.’
      • ‘Militis has a better chance in the 200m backstroke but both swimmers should be in with a shout of the finals, and from that point anything can happen.’
      • ‘It's more of a team thing and if we bowl out 13 sides like last season we will be in with a shout.’
      • ‘I did think I was in with a shout as all three of my horses had chances.’
      • ‘Pearce still thinks others have better credentials, but now that it is apparent that he really is in with a shout, he is not about to jeopardise his chances by ruling himself out.’
      • ‘We're in with a shout for three trophies and we'll be trying hard for all of them.’
      • ‘And the fact they are now in with a shout of qualifying for a second successive European campaign is all the more remarkable given the strain placed on a relatively small squad.’
      • ‘In the Fours, Michael Bruce, Graham Brooke, Eddie Howcroft and Phil Parsons were in with a shout at 7-5 down after eight ends.’
  • shout something from the rooftops

    • Talk about something openly and jubilantly, especially something that is personal or has previously been kept secret.

      • ‘Instead of shouting my faith from the rooftops, I lived quietly with the Gods.’
      • ‘She's hoping that now she is shouting it from the rooftops other people will start to take notice as well.’
      • ‘He may not shout it from the rooftops, but he is incredibly passionate about his rugby.’
      • ‘Then again, Dean wasn't exactly shouting it from the rooftops, either.’
      • ‘So if you are proud of your city then there is a chance to shout it from the rooftops!’
      • ‘Unionist politicians should be shouting their disgust from the rooftops too.’
      • ‘They need instead to shout their message from the rooftops.’
      • ‘We want readers to shout their support from the rooftops.’
      • ‘We're not going to shout it from the rooftops, but if the key players stay fit we feel we're capable of surprising a few people.’
      • ‘Now please do us all a favour and shout it from the rooftops.’
  • shout the odds

    • Talk in a loud and opinionated way.

      • ‘Bravado is all very well, but when it costs you a place in history, it's worth thinking twice before you shout the odds to all and sundry.’
      • ‘Again, we'll have our vocal minority shouting the odds about the disrespect accorded to African leaders.’
      • ‘With only six games left, he can no longer resist the chance to influence the game directly rather than shouting the odds from the touchline.’
      • ‘When mayor Nomaindia Mfeketo invited public participation in formulation of the city budget, she didn't mean that citizens should shout the odds from the public gallery.’
      • ‘I haven't seen him shout the odds against a South African side for quite some time.’
      • ‘While I'm pleased about that, I now realise that it was wrong to lure them here under false pretences by losing my temper and shouting the odds all over the place.’
      • ‘This direct approach is far healthier than acting like a martyr or shouting the odds.’
      • ‘He could have done a bit of homework before shouting the odds.’
      • ‘Perhaps rather than shouting the odds, we should be willing to help and encourage those who want to quit.’
      • ‘While he was shouting the odds I recalled my own sour mood this morning having seen the BBC TV Breakfast News.’

Origin

Late Middle English: perhaps related to shoot; compare with Old Norse skúta a taunt also with the verb scout.

Pronunciation:

shout

/SHout/