Definition of shortwave in English:

shortwave

noun

  • 1A radio wave of a wavelength between about 10 and 100 m (and a frequency of about 3 to 30 MHz)

    [as modifier] ‘a shortwave transmitter’
    1. 1.1Broadcasting using radio waves of between 10 and 100 m wavelength.
      [as modifier] ‘shortwave radio’
      • ‘Earlier tonight, I had them bring you a short-wave radio.’
      • ‘Jim carried a tiny short-wave radio, but in these high valleys we could hear only Chinese and Russian voices.’
      • ‘The large sweep we had with that one short wave transmitter doesn't exist any more.’
      • ‘Records show that, on opening, it had space for 21 police vehicles, including 14 equipped with short-wave radios.’
      • ‘Next time they must plan better, with short wave transmitters.’
      • ‘The first was the short-wave transmitter, which could be used to communicate at great distances but was small enough to fit into an aircraft or tank.’
      • ‘From 1936 onwards short-wave radio stations replaced the posts on the Yukon Telegraph line.’
      • ‘She purchased a short-wave radio to listen to ‘Radio Hanoi,’ a Hanoi station that could be picked-up through a relay in Cuba, to collect any possible information.’
      • ‘And the closest he can get to his family at Christmas is an e-mail sent from his expedition computer, a short wave radio message or, at best, a brief call on his mobile phone.’
      • ‘Eminent mathematicians once claimed to prove logically that short-wave radio was impossible.’
      • ‘Overseas short-wave transmission wasn't reliable enough to send live commentary back to Australia.’
      • ‘In devastated areas, short-wave radios are likely to be more common and reliable than Internet connections.’
      • ‘Everything was censored and she relied on the BBC, broadcast through her short-wave radio, for real news from the outside world.’
      • ‘I was sharing a tent with John Hunt and set up a short-wave radio to listen to the Met Office weather report.’
      • ‘Those who listened to international radio broadcasts will recall the ebb and flow of the short-wave signal as it made its way from the other side of the planet.’
      • ‘US officials were convinced their electronic eavesdropping devices had picked up his voice on a short-wave radio.’
      • ‘With telephone connections so difficult from Arecibo, Hulse used the observatory's short-wave radio link to Cornell University.’
      • ‘I was lying in my tent and heard the news on my short-wave radio from the BBC World Service.’
      • ‘All Church Services from Ballina-Boher parish are broadcast on short-wave radio.’
      • ‘I mean, think about the ban on short-wave radio.’

Pronunciation:

shortwave

/ˈSHôrtwāv/