Main definitions of shore in US English:

: shore1shore2shore3

shore1

noun

  • 1The land along the edge of a sea, lake, or other large body of water.

    ‘I took the tiller and made for the shore’
    • ‘Eight holes are along the shores of Lake Michigan and strong winds could be a major factor in the event.’
    • ‘This would mark the start of our trek along the shore of Loch Ness.’
    • ‘Well, it's overcast and windy along the shores of Lake Michigan and Eastern Wisconsin.’
    • ‘But the settlers had come to like living along the shores of Tor Bay, and they politely declined.’
    • ‘She could hear the soft lapping of the lake water on its shores, and the rustle of the breeze through the leaves of the trees.’
    • ‘Geological analyses indicate that ancient Herto residents lived along the shores of a shallow lake inhabited by hippos, crocodiles, and catfish.’
    • ‘Some cabins and resorts are scattered along the lake shores.’
    • ‘All the events are in a continuous space, stretching along the lake shore and including the youth camp.’
    • ‘But community councillors representing the string of villages along the shores of Loch Ness have already submitted objections.’
    • ‘The species apparently grew along shores of lakes and fresh-water lagoons.’
    • ‘With heavy settlements along the shores of the Vembanad Lake, the tsunami would have had a smothering effect on the city.’
    • ‘This annual grass grows in shallow water in slow streams and rivers and even along the shores of certain lakes.’
    • ‘Fewer and fewer locals and tourists picnic along the lake's shores following the disappearance of tourist resorts and recreation spots due to increasing population.’
    • ‘Native Americans, who originally lived along the shores of the lake, considered it their spiritual home, their Garden of Eden.’
    • ‘But he certainly helped to accelerate the rate of economic and social change in the cities and towns along the shore of Lake Michigan.’
    • ‘It also revived a business coalition formed years earlier to promote the waterway for the benefit of communities along its shores.’
    • ‘The first fossils from this area were found in 1819 in limestone along the lake's shore, and new species continue to be found there.’
    • ‘Along the shores of the lake, tall trees rise to the sky.’
    • ‘The salmon can be raised economically only in pens along the ocean shore or in estuaries.’
    • ‘These figures for the most part do not include freshwater wetlands along the shores of lakes, banks of rivers, in estuaries and along the marine coasts.’
    seashore, seaside, beach, coast, coastal region, seaboard, sea coast, bank, lakeside, verge, edge, shoreline, waterside, front, shoreside, foreshore, sand, sands
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Law The land between ordinary high- and low-water marks.
    2. 1.2usually shores A country or other geographic area bounded by a coast.
      ‘the shores of the New World’
      • ‘Now, maybe it is time to bring them back to our own shores to remind us again what makes this country great.’
      • ‘At 26, Wilder arrived on American shores with just $11 in his pocket, and from that moment on, he lived his life in English.’
      • ‘She runs a course called Recovery, developed in the USA in 1976 by Dr Bruce Fisher but only now reaching our shores.’
      • ‘Still others reformed entire countries, making way for U.S. products on distant shores.’
      • ‘Immigrants from more distant shores than those of Ireland, Scotland, and Wales have made them their own.’
      • ‘The invasions of Germanic peoples brought strong traditions of customary law to these shores.’
      • ‘The bombs, we assure ourselves, will not reach our shores.’
      • ‘‘It does migrate northwards into Europe and occasionally reaches our shores,’ he said.’
      • ‘This month, The Producers, one of Broadway's biggest-ever successes, finally reaches our shores.’
      • ‘With some historical detective work, they manage to reconstruct a genealogy, tracing their line back to early colonists or distant shores.’
      • ‘At the same time, we are experiencing vulnerability on our own shores and grief for the innocent lives that will be lost on distant shores.’
      • ‘Plant hunters were bringing exotic new species from distant shores and their finds prompted extreme security measures such as man-traps.’
      • ‘It could be that they were bound to the distant shores of Africa or Brazil.’
      • ‘Each of the huge rafters had been carved from a single tree, and old tombstones told tales of deaths on distant shores as, indeed, they did in Kochi's St. Francis Church.’
      • ‘When the first humans reached our shores, America was the greatest unexplored frontier on earth.’
      • ‘The officials told him that they had nothing to do with the cigarettes once they reached Colombian shores.’
      • ‘Many still think it is an African disease that is too distant from their shores.’
      • ‘Heaven help the pharmacists if the debate getting under way in the US about mail-order prescription medicines ever reaches our shores.’
      • ‘We have always been concerned with the welfare of those Indian workers who travel to distant shores in search of higher remuneration.’
      • ‘Some even claim that the game will never reach our shores.’

Phrases

  • on shore

    • Ashore; on land.

      ‘are any of the crew left on shore?’
      • ‘A week later their supplies had been completely exhausted but they landed on shore in time.’
      • ‘Harbor seals give birth on shore and nurse their pups for four to five weeks.’
      • ‘One day he discovers a coffin washed up on shore and in it the perfectly preserved body of a sailor.’
      • ‘When I was safely on shore, the smell of fish hit me like a brick wall.’
      • ‘He's a great sailor and fighter, but on shore has more than his share of shortcomings as a businessman, politician and husband.’
      • ‘As the pedal boat landed on shore, Louis and one of the men who was on the pedal boat carried Stephen off from the boat and laid him on the sand.’
      • ‘If the network is implemented, the navy will achieve its goal of information sharing between its ships and command centers on shore.’
      • ‘Some states originally allowed gambling only on boats that were not anchored in harbors, while gambling is now is allowed on shore.’
      • ‘We have to speak out passionately to try to get the Tampa boat people on shore.’
      • ‘There were very few lights on shore, but the glow on the horizon to the northeast clearly pointed the way to Cartagena.’

Origin

Middle English: from Middle Dutch, Middle Low German schōre; perhaps related to the verb shear.

Pronunciation

shore

/SHôr//ʃɔr/

Main definitions of shore in US English:

: shore1shore2shore3

shore2

noun

  • A prop or beam set obliquely against something weak or unstable as a support.

verb

[with object]shore something up
  • 1Support or hold up something with props or beams.

    ‘rescue workers had to shore up the building, which was in danger of collapse’
    • ‘Mr. Ye not only shored up the building's structure, but also had students and teachers prepare for a disaster.’
    • ‘Cutting prices may shore things up temporarily and makes sense as Christmas approaches.’
    • ‘The money could be spent on shoring up doors and windows as well as measures to protect interiors and wiring.’
    • ‘During construction it was shored up with piles and the new building built around it.’
    • ‘A 15th century stately home near Westbury is still experiencing major structural problems two years after action was taken to shore it up.’
    • ‘Will direct marketing shore up this weak spot in our defenses?’
    • ‘On top of that, a government that is behind in the polls and not too far from the next election might not be able to resist the temptation to get involved and shore up its support.’
    • ‘He says it has had to be shored up by millions of pounds of taxpayers' money over the years.’
    • ‘They were able to gain access a second time only after additional work to shore up the badly damaged structure.’
    • ‘Tunnel roofs are shored up with some 21,000 iron bolts driven 8 to 10 feet into the overhead rock.’
    • ‘Chances are that while you are there a carpenter or glazier will be at work shoring up as window or correcting a lean.’
    • ‘As recovery efforts continue, the structure is being shored up with pressure-treated wood posts to protect against further collapses.’
    • ‘We are seeing water being pumped, the levees being shored up again.’
    • ‘The building has since been shored up by more than five miles of scaffolding.’
    • ‘When the domination of the multinational corporations is threatened, the military violence of the state is used to shore the system up.’
    • ‘Centuries ago in China, workers buried adobe blocks to shore up buildings.’
    • ‘Vigilance must be shored up with action at the right time.’
    • ‘There was a host of tasks, from shoring up the fire escape to re-wiring to new windows.’
    • ‘She said: ‘First of all the building needs to be shored up so it needs to be surveyed.’’
    • ‘Hopefully, clubs will rally round and try to help them out, perhaps by loaning players to shore them up in the short term.’
    • ‘On one side, where it threatened to fall over into the garden, it was shored up with baulks of timber, driftwood picked up on the strand.’
    • ‘Once the floor beams were securely shored up with bricks, the school girls carried plywood for the flooring.’
    • ‘Anyone is free to try to make the claim that availing oneself of Western Capitalism or failing to challenge it actively is helping to shore it up and siding with the status quo.’
    • ‘The first phase of restoration, which was completed two years ago, shored up the brick masonry on the northeast corner.’
    • ‘Chalk has never been used to shore up a monument in this way before.’
    • ‘The foundations had to be shored up, the main staircase substantially repaired, and missing parts of the rear elevation rebuilt.’
    • ‘Flooding is an annual curse for the Chinese people, but there is a desperation surrounding attempts to shore up the crumbling banks of Dongting Lake.’
    • ‘Wall Street had hoped that it would be shored up by a combination of patriotism and efforts by the Federal Reserve.’
    • ‘A volunteer Orkney road safety group looks set to be financially shored up with an annual grant from the council.’
    • ‘The FDA should be shored up as a truly independent agency.’
    prop up, hold up, bolster up, support, brace, buttress, strengthen, fortify, reinforce, underpin, truss, stay
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Support or assist something that would otherwise fail or decline.
      ‘Congress approved a $700 billion plan to shore up the financial industry’
      • ‘Cardoso appeals to the spirit of the nation's soccer fans to shore up the confidence of the country.’
      • ‘Justified or not, the call for reparations seems to me to be based around shoring up racial tensions rather than diffusing them.’
      • ‘An awful lot of your money being used to shore up Bank of America.’
      • ‘Widespread opposition to a proposed Afghan law is less about liberating women than shoring up Western authority.’
      • ‘The English have made a host of changes, primarily to shore up their defence.’
      • ‘Bank profits are being channelled into shoring up their balance sheets, rather than new investments.’
      • ‘This morning he arrived in Turkey to shore up White House relations with a key U. S. ally.’
      • ‘He expects Chirac will launch a fierce attack on Britain to shore up his domestic support.’
      • ‘Now both seem likely to return to the transfer market to shore up their resources in the position.’
      • ‘The government wants all workers to take out a second, private, pension to shore up the declining state pension.’

Origin

Middle English: from Middle Dutch, Middle Low German schore ‘prop’, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

shore

/SHôr//ʃɔr/

Main definitions of shore in US English:

: shore1shore2shore3

shore3

Pronunciation

shore

/SHôr//ʃɔr/