Definition of shirtfront in English:

shirtfront

noun

  • 1The front part of a shirt.

    • ‘I have always wondered about the best way to crack a crab, a method that won't leave your thumbs bruised and shirt front splattered.’
    • ‘As he drew close he noticed a red stain spreading on the dead man's shirt front.’
    • ‘He grabbed the man by his shirt front and pulled him to his feet.’
    • ‘The only time to tuck a napkin into a shirt front is when you are a guest at a crab feast or picnic.’
    • ‘We are a small group of writers and we have long lunches and I usually end up with gravy down my shirt front.’
    • ‘On the shirt pattern, trim off the hem allowances on the sleeve and shirt front and back lower edges.’
    • ‘He jumped out of his chair, jostling a waiter who spilled coffee down Iger's shirt front, ruining his tie.’
    • ‘The burger started shedding lettuce shreds and tomato seeds down my shirt front.’
    • ‘The stiff interfacing that makes the collar work would make the shirt front too rigid to hang properly.’
    • ‘With a gasp she buried her face in his shirt front.’
  • 2Australian informal (in Australian Rules) an act of charging into an opponent's chest, typically so as to knock them to the ground.

    ‘the skipper was booked for a late shirtfront’
    • ‘Goddard went on Twitter to praise the shirtfront that Kelly laid on him during Friday night's win to the Cats.’
    • ‘His run of 158 matches for the Blues was abruptly ended at the MCG by way of a vicious shirtfront which left him with concussion and a broken jaw.’
    • ‘In a triumph of AFL rebranding, the players who leave themselves open to a shirtfront are now the hard men.’
    • ‘The younger Brown had an instinctive facility for marking his arrival at a contest with a perfectly-timed shirtfront.’
    • ‘Suns defender Steven May set the tone back then when he pulled off a huge shirtfront on Zorko in the first quarter.’
    • ‘In modern footy parlance, toughness no longer means being the guy you'd least like to receive a shirtfront from.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]Australian
informal
  • 1 (in Australian Rules) charge into the chest of (an opponent), typically so as to knock them to the ground.

    ‘he shirtfronted a Collingwood player in front of the Ryder Stand at Victoria Park’
    • ‘Hunt highlighted his toughness in the Suns' last pre-season match against the Brisbane Lions when he was accidentally shirtfronted by a teammate in a marking contest.’
    • ‘He carried his Australian rules passion beyond school into club matches until the day he was shirtfronted and badly winded by an opponent.’
    • ‘Jordan kicked 7.4 before Xavs forward Scott Mollard shirtfronted him early in the last quarter.’
    • ‘Chambers shirtfronted Habana just as he kicked ahead close to the line.’
    • ‘The team's best tagger, Ray Bartholomew, was shirtfronted by Spaanderman early in the game.’
    1. 1.1Forcefully collide with.
      ‘the move follows complaints about out-of-control skaters, including one incident last week when a shopper was shirtfronted’
      • ‘Cricket became a contact sport as Andrew Symonds shirt-fronted a streaker at the Gabba last night.’
      • ‘I nearly shirtfronted Bob Davis who was hustling his way in the opposite direction on Collins St.’
      • ‘He was shirt-fronted and knocked off his chair by the Victory captain as he attempted to pick up a ball at his feet late in the game.’
      • ‘The Prime Minister was shirtfronted by a highly agitated and aggressive support clerk, who appeared to be engaged in a dispute with a colleague’
    2. 1.2Vigorously confront or challenge.
      ‘he shirtfronted Skelton when he arrived in Alice Springs ahead of the election, demanding that he declare his relationship with Rogers’
      • ‘He showed admirable spunk yesterday when he shirt-fronted Rudd after his press conference at Garden Island.’
      • ‘He hit world headlines after threatening to "shirtfront" the Russian president but has since toned down his language.’
      • ‘One fan shirtfronted the captain in a bar and said: "You let us down. We're really disappointed in you."’
      • ‘This was a case of a deputy shirt-fronting her leader with an ultimatum and forcing a decision that would come close to wrecking the government's environmental credibility.’
      • ‘The truth, concedes the hard man whose law firm shirtfronted the State Government over the affair, is that he doubts "I could have done a better job myself and nor could anyone else I can think of."’
      • ‘Both had blamed each other for the crash and shirtfronted one another in a confrontation seen by the national TV audience watching the event.’
      • ‘In recent weeks, he's been shirt-fronting his own government, questioning cuts to single mother benefits.’
      • ‘It's about time that if Australia believes in freedom of speech we should shirtfront these people who have made such a nonsense of it.’
      • ‘It was a different story last year when Labor MPs shirt-fronted Pyne at the same nightspot for a frank discussion on electoral rorts.’

Pronunciation:

shirtfront

/ˈSHərtˌfrənt/