Definition of shipwreck in US English:

shipwreck

noun

  • 1The destruction of a ship at sea by sinking or breaking up, e.g., in a storm or after running aground.

    • ‘Most major human disasters - nuclear accidents, shipwrecks and train crashes - have occurred because of a lack of it.’
    • ‘The story is of the utmost simplicity: after a shipwreck, a sailor is lost at sea.’
    • ‘The Prestige broke up about 150 miles off the Coast of Death - so named because of the frequency of shipwrecks - after running into trouble during a storm.’
    • ‘In several previous shipwrecks sailors have been driven to cannibalism.’
    • ‘It originally referred to someone who deliberately caused shipwrecks by using false beacons to lure ships onto rocks, or someone who plundered goods from wrecked ships.’
    • ‘Turner lashed himself to masts in order to witness the fury of storms at sea, and he was fascinated by shipwrecks.’
    • ‘In 1675, however, the Caribs welcomed black Africans who survived the shipwreck of a Dutch ship carrying settlers and slaves.’
    • ‘The annals of the marine record no example of a shipwreck so terrible as that of the Medusa frigate.’
    • ‘Impetuous storms and violent shipwrecks occur at sea.’
    • ‘With the help of his faithful spirit Ariel, Prospero conjures up a great storm causing a shipwreck on the shore nearby.’
    • ‘Rather than causing shipwrecks, the little mermaid saves the life of a shipwrecked prince, then makes a bargain with the sea-witch, exchanging her tongue for a pair of human legs.’
    • ‘According to one legend, the ponies on this 37-mile-long barrier island are descendants of horses that survived the shipwreck of a Spanish galleon.’
    • ‘For Virilio, to invent the ship is to invent the shipwreck and to invent the train is to invent the derailment.’
    • ‘Some say St Patrick himself built the chapel after surviving a shipwreck on the rocks below.’
    • ‘It is a fable recalled by a lonely man who lies between the clumps of grass on the sands by a river (the scene looks deceptively lyrical), like a survivor washed ashore after a shipwreck.’
    • ‘On the way, a great windstorm causes a shipwreck and a lone sailor is found on the ‘Island of the Soul.’’
    • ‘Property insurance developed in response to the hazards faced by medieval exporters, for example losses from shipwreck, piracy, or theft.’
    • ‘There have been shipwrecks here, for as long as there has been shipping.’
    • ‘Most of these shipwrecks came about by collision, by storm, or by bad navigation.’
    • ‘The Sussex coast at this point lacks any rocks or cliffs, and shipwrecks were never common here.’
    wreck, ruin, shell, skeleton, hull, frame, framework, derelict
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    1. 1.1 A ship so destroyed.
      ‘the detritus of a forgotten shipwreck in an Arctic sea’
      • ‘The irony is that every time someone finds and salvages an old shipwreck, archaeologists scream their heads off and accuse the divers and salvors of looting and obliterating an underwater site.’
      • ‘There, two old keys made of gold and silver are exhibited in a window as part of the treasure of historical information salvaged from a local shipwreck.’
      • ‘Besides the reef, the Keys are full of accidental and manmade shipwrecks to dive on.’
      • ‘There were a record number of entries from yellow submarines, tall ships, small ships, rafts, sea serpents, to shipwrecks and fishing boats and lots more besides.’
      • ‘Each summer there is a one- or two-week field trip to survey historical shipwrecks and the submerged (but once-dry) coastline of the Solent.’
      • ‘The Heritage Office has released a shipwreck conservation management plan that documents the discovery of the submarine.’
      • ‘Scuba divers and snorkelers explore historic shipwrecks and artificial reefs.’
      • ‘The dig, which began Monday, was a second priority for the divers, whose main goal was to survey the shipwreck site for storm damage.’
      • ‘Here, you can explore untouched reefs and many shipwrecks.’
      • ‘The centre can arrange licences to dive on the two designated historic shipwrecks in the Sound of Mull, the Dartmouth and the Swan.’
      • ‘The World Heritage area includes Aboriginal middens and sacred sites as well as historical shipwrecks and ruins of early European settlement.’
      • ‘With a treacherous shoreline and marine traffic for many thousands of years, the coast of Ireland is strewn with shipwrecks, or sites where vessels have foundered.’
      • ‘Various environmental forces eventually break down shipwrecks, but Ballard suspects more than natural forces are at work in this case.’
      • ‘Unesco has adopted a new cultural convention to protect historic shipwrecks and underwater artefacts from pillaging.’
      • ‘To find out why this happened and when we must go back to the thirteenth history and a shipwreck off the Wexford coast.’
      • ‘Widely regarded as the Mount Everest of diveable shipwrecks is the ocean liner HMHS Britannic.’
      • ‘I was an avid wreck diver, and it was the ultimate shipwreck.’
      • ‘Our tour of Corsica ends at Bastia, which has several shipwrecks and a number of aircraft wrecks.’
      • ‘The Museum houses an impressive collection of artefacts and pictures relating to many famous ships and shipwrecks.’
      • ‘The agency stress that it is illegal to keep something, however small or seemingly insignificant, from a shipwreck without advising the Receiver of Wreck.’

verb

be shipwrecked
  • (of a person or ship) suffer a shipwreck.

    ‘he was shipwrecked off the coast of Sardinia and nearly drowned’
    figurative ‘her right to a fair trial might be shipwrecked by prosecutorial misconduct’
    • ‘Off the Kent coast shipwrecked seamen managed to find a foothold don the Goodwin Sands, but they knew the rising sea would drown them if they were not taken off.’
    • ‘In 1609, a group of British colonists led by Sir George Somers was shipwrecked and stranded on the islands for 10 months.’
    • ‘By the end of the novel he is spiritually shipwrecked on the Gold Coast, having visions of ancient goddesses.’
    • ‘In Book I, his ship is blown off course and Gulliver is shipwrecked.’
    • ‘An ideal young boy's yarn about the earnest young English couple shipwrecked off the coast of Darkest Africa.’
    • ‘A poor Jamaican fisherman was shipwrecked on a desert island.’
    • ‘In 1528 a Spanish exploration party leaving from Mexico became shipwrecked off the coast of Florida.’
    • ‘It was here, in AD60, that the Apostle St Paul was rumoured to have lived whilst shipwrecked.’
    • ‘Accounts written by other mariners shipwrecked along the same coast chronicled brutal enslavement at the hands of ruthless desert nomads.’
    • ‘Far from being shipwrecked on the coast at St Andrew's, the saint almost certainly made his appearance in Scotland within a bag carried by Acca, an abbot from the North of England.’
    • ‘William's claim was strengthened when Harold, shipwrecked on the coast of Normandy, promise to support William's claim - albeit under some duress.’
    • ‘It was on such a ship that St Paul reached Italy after having been shipwrecked on Malta.’
    • ‘Dashed upon a bleak, inhospitable and unfortunately uninhabited shore, the five shipwrecked souls were faced with extinction if not rescued.’
    • ‘During the 17th and 18th centuries, there were other mariners shipwrecked or abandoned and subsequently rescued.’
    • ‘In 1064, Harold was shipwrecked on the coast of Ponthieu.’
    • ‘Viola is shipwrecked off the coast of Illyria and, separated from her twin Sebastian, believes him drowned.’
    • ‘They took their name from the piece of equipment which was used in the 19th century to rescue shipwrecked vessels.’
    • ‘After a five-year apprenticeship in a small grocer's shop he set sail for Columbia in November 1841, but was shipwrecked off the coast of Holland.’
    • ‘Today the morality tale of this York shipwrecked mariner is republished as ‘classic summer reading’.’
    • ‘On his return from a visit to the Holy Land in about the year 667 he was shipwrecked off Taranto, where he landed and began to minister.’
    foundered, ashore, beached, grounded, stuck, shipwrecked, wrecked, high and dry, on the rocks, on the bottom, on the ground
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Pronunciation

shipwreck

/ˈSHipˌrek//ˈʃɪpˌrɛk/