Definition of serviette in English:

serviette

noun

British, Canadian
  • A table napkin.

    • ‘As a result our paper serviettes were useless by the time we reached a table.’
    • ‘Ann was pleased with the quality and size of the serviettes.’
    • ‘For a change the serviette was not under the food!’
    • ‘Why put a serviette between the baguette and plate?’
    • ‘I draw all the time, on scraps of paper, serviettes, anything that's around.’
    • ‘Unable to catch the waitress's eye, I went in search of knives and serviettes.’
    • ‘Along with your vouchers you also get serviettes.’
    • ‘It was so dry that I chickened out and wrapped it up in a serviette for home consumption.’
    • ‘Although attractively and efficiently served both the teacake and croissants came on top of serviettes.’
    • ‘Fortunately we managed to recover our serviettes before they became soaked with melted butter.’
    • ‘We would have appreciated serviettes but thought this was probably an oversight.’
    • ‘I arrange some serviettes on the table, along with some cutlery and utensils.’
    • ‘Regular users will know that serviettes and straws are located at central points around the restaurant.’
    • ‘Mel wiped his forehead with a serviette every few minutes.’
    • ‘Implements such as tongs and serviettes must be used as far as possible to avoid the direct handling of food.’
    • ‘Quickly scanning the table in front of me, I began hastily withdrawing serviettes from the dispenser to my right.’
    • ‘There were plates on the neatly arranged table and glasses and serviettes.’
    • ‘In addition she went in search of serviettes and brought them to our table.’
    • ‘The two Japanese girls working there started talking Japanese very quickly and running around, cramming a wad of serviettes into my hand.’
    • ‘The waitress helpfully provided cutlery and serviettes.’

Origin

Late 15th century: from Old French, from servir to serve.

Pronunciation:

serviette

/ˌsərvēˈet/