Definition of sentimentalize in US English:

sentimentalize

verb

[with object]
  • Treat, regard, or portray (someone or something) with exaggerated and self-indulgent feelings of tenderness, sadness, or nostalgia.

    ‘the impossibly sentimentalized and saintly ideal of the Virgin Mother’
    • ‘Instead, it's uncomfortably present-day in its stark depiction of the machinations of money, wealth and love, all heightened by Davies's refusal to sentimentalize those topics.’
    • ‘And because he wants, intermittently, to sentimentalize their dilemmas, he has a hard time generating genuinely potent satire.’
    • ‘To her credit, Leslie treats them seriously, without sentimentalizing the characters or their experiences.’
    • ‘I like the way he championed underdogs without sentimentalizing them: ‘Stand up, take your mat and walk’, he said to the man who had a touch of self-pity in his complaint that no one would help him.’
    • ‘And to say that Simpson doesn't sentimentalize this role would be a massive understatement.’
    • ‘This self-inculpation for events not involving the apologists' complicity personalizes and sentimentalizes an act of crime or dereliction.’
    • ‘Let's stop sentimentalising the fuddy-duddies who cling to outmoded ‘ethical’ concepts and start applauding those with the courage to brush away the cobwebs of scruple and get on with making money!’
    • ‘The story of a nun who befriends a man on death row never sentimentalises the issues, but is an unforgettable study of capital punishment's cynicism.’
    • ‘Kate's predicament is never sentimentalized, and the tough decisions she faces aren't simplified to bring about a tidy little ending.’
    • ‘We sentimentalize the great figures of our past, and then we find out that they were human beings who did both things that were exceptional and other things that perhaps weren't savory at all.’
    • ‘We have sentimentalized our understanding of God's relationship to humanity.’
    • ‘In most films, these matters are sentimentalized or skirted altogether.’
    • ‘In an age in which young girls were sentimentalized as emblems of purity and beauty, Carroll regarded little girls with great adoration, almost worship.’
    • ‘Reading his book over a century later, in an age that has sentimentalised illness and therapy, his remarks sound disconcertingly moderate.’
    • ‘There is nothing sentimentalized or homogenized about this story or the characters.’
    • ‘We censor it, sentimentalise it, treat it as a commodity.’
    • ‘Meyer, taking his lead from his subject, relates his struggle without sentimentalising it.’
    • ‘But as long as you make the problems genuine and the characters strive with all their considerable abilities to solve them, you are not going to patronise them or sentimentalise them.’
    • ‘But Jenkins doesn't resort to sentimentalising her to generate sympathy.’
    • ‘One sister in London, England, sentimentalizes Montreal and pines to be here.’

Pronunciation

sentimentalize

/ˌsen(t)əˈmen(t)lˌīz//ˌsɛn(t)əˈmɛn(t)lˌaɪz/